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This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://mailchi.mp/913f8b91f429/u30vyc70dp?e=4c166665d8

 

BAJS_CEU_

LEO BAECK COLLEGE, LIBRARIAN

A wonderful opportunity has arisen for the post of Librarian at Leo Baeck College to start in September 2017. This position is a unique chance for the right person to participate in the exciting developments planned for our exceptional library.

The ideal candidate will be able to demonstrate the following:

  • A qualification in library sciences or experience of working in an academic library. If no formal librarianship qualification is held, a willingness to undertake a library sciences award over the first two years of employment
  • Basic knowledge of Jewish Studies as an academic discipline
  • English and Hebrew language skills
  • Excellent organisational skills
  • Excellent interpersonal skills
  • Good IT skills overall and also particularly in relation to library management
  • Experience of working in a team but also ability to work on own initiative

Salary: £30,000 to £35,000 dependent on experience and qualifications

Post: Between 0.8 and full-time.

Possible teaching opportunities for suitably qualified candidates.

Job shares will also be considered.

Statutory and Jewish holidays with early closing on Friday.

For a full job description and application form see the work for us section of the LBC website (www.lbc.ac.uk) or contact Rhona Lesner on + 44 (0)20 8349 5621, email rhona.lesner@lbc.ac.uk.

Completed applications, including a full CV and names of referees, should be sent to: Rhona Lesner, Leo Baeck College, the Sternberg Centre for Judaism, 80 East End Road, London N3 2SY

The Search Committee will begin to review applications after the closing date of Wednesday 26 April. Interviews will take place the week beginning 2 May 2017.

 Leo Baeck College offers training for rabbis and educators for the Progressive Jewish world in the UK and Europe. Its degree courses are validated by Middlesex University. The College Library has holdings in excess of 60,000 titles, including a significant collection of rare books and archival materials.

 

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=25db21abde&e=4c166665d8

 

Job Description

Title: Director of Programmes

Contract: Full Time/Permanent

Department: Education

Responsible to: Chief Executive

Usual Hours: 9.00am – 5.30pm

Salary: £50,000 – £60,000 depending on experience

Location: Central London

Holidays: 22 days per annum, plus Bank Holidays, plus two days for Rosh Hashanah and one day for Yom Kippur should they fall on weekdays

The deadline for applications is 5.30pm on Monday 10th April. CVs and cover letters should go to hrconsultants@het.org.uk.

The aim of the Director of Programmes is to develop and lead on the educational programmes delivered by the Holocaust Educational Trust that reach teachers and students across the UK.

Programme Development and Delivery

  •  Maximise the visibility, uptake and impact of the Trust’s educational programmes, including teacher training, the Outreach programme and the development of teaching resources
  •  Work with the Chief Executive and Senior Management team to develop and deliver the Trust’s long-term strategy on Holocaust education
  •  Identify opportunities to engage with new audiences and to deepen engagement with existing ones
  • Respond to the needs of schools, teachers and students, including overseeing the creation of new educational programmes or initiatives, including working in partnership with organisations with complementary aims where appropriate
  •  Act as the external, front-facing representative of the Trust at educational conferences and events
  •  Build and maintain relationships with organisations in the education sector
  • Deliver occasional educational sessions for teachers and students as and when necessary

 Management

  •  Oversee the management of the education team
  • Serve as a member of the Senior Management Team
  • Communicate strategies, policies and procedures effectively to staff

Person Specification

Qualifications and Experience

Essential

  •  Experience working in the charity and/or education sector
  • A proven track-record of project management and the development and management of budgets
  •  A proven track-record of successfully designing and implementing educational programmes and initiatives and/or programmes working with young people
  • Experience of delivery of nation-wide programmes to a high standard
  • Experience managing staff

Desirable

  •  A recognised teaching qualification (eg PGCE)

Knowledge and Skills

Essential

  •  Familiarity with contemporary trends in the UK educational sector
  • A sound knowledge of where the Holocaust fits within the UK curriculum
  •  Understanding of how best to evaluate the impact of educational programmes
  • Strong written and oral communication skills including the ability to present to large groups
  •  Good organisational skills and attention to detail; ability to plan and prioritise a heavy workload and keep to targets and deadlines
  • Understanding of effective approaches to marketing and promoting educational programmes to teachers and schools
  • Excellent IT skills

Desirable

  •  Sound knowledge of the Holocaust, its contemporary relevance and Holocaust pedagogy
  • Familiarity with key organisations involved in Holocaust education
  • Understanding of fundraising and public relations

 Interpersonal Skills

Essential

  • Ability to work creatively and develop new ideas, take initiative and work without constant supervision
  • Ability to network and build relationships with people at all levels
  • Availability to travel within the UK and abroad and to work occasional evenings and weekends
  • A proactive, positive and team-orientated approach with a high level of integrity and confidence
  • Willingness to be flexible and adapt to changing demands and priorities.

Applications Open  for the online course, ‘Interreligious Understanding Today’

REMINDER – APPLICATION DEADLINE: 17 March 2017

 As we live in an age of increasing plurality but also instability, the need for interreligious understanding, which is grounded on solid academic research and in touch with the realities of interreligious encounter, is greater than ever.

Interreligious Understanding Today will provide a forum in which participants will:

  • explore different kinds of interreligious understanding between Abrahamic religions and beyond;
  • compare the ways in which such understanding can be achieved in different cultural and political contexts in the world (US, Asia, Europe);
  • study the relationship between secularity and interreligious understanding;
  • and explore the ways in which the challenges to interreligious understanding  posed by religious nationalisms and extremisms can be addressed.

The course is multidisciplinary, engaging with religious studies and sociological, historical and philosophical approaches.

For further details, visit http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/study/e-learning/interreligious-understanding.asp.

The closing date for applications is 17 March 2017. The course commences on 3 April 2017.

If you have any queries about the course, contact Dr Emma Harris at eth22@cam.ac.uk.

 

 

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=a7185b34d2&e=4c166665d8

 

New Jewish Studies digital resource now live: The Littman E-Library of Jewish Civilization

Following on from our notice last month, Liverpool University Press are delighted to announce the launch of The Littman E-Library of Jewish Civilization.

Browse all 90 volumes: http://online.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/series/lejc

 How do I access the LEJC?

2017 prices: £3,700 / US $4,950

The LEJC is available for one-off purchase by institutions with options for online access to content in perpetuity. We offer libraries 30-day free trials of content, for more information or to place an order email j.collinson@liverpool.ac.uk

 Highlights from The Littman E-Library of Jewish Civilization

The Wisdom of the Zohar Volumes 1-3

The Zohar is the fundamental work of Jewish mysticism. Isaiah Tishby’s classic and definitive The Wisdom of the Zohar makes the world of the Zohar available to the English-speaking reader in all its complexity and poetry. Read more > http://online.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/doi/book/10.3828/978-1-874774-28-0

 How Jewish is Jewish History?

Moshe Rosman treats the key questions that postmodernism raises for the writing of Jewish history. What is the relationship between Jewish culture and history and those of the non-Jews among whom Jews live? Read more > http://online.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/doi/book/10.3828/978-1-904113-85-0

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 1

In this volume of Polin, scholars from the fields of history, sociology, politics, anthropology, linguistics, literature, and folklore explore central themes in Jewish and European history.

Read more > http://online.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/doi/book/10.3828/978-1-904113-17-1

British Jewry and the Holocaust

How did British Jewry respond to the Holocaust, how prominent was it on the communal agenda, and what does this response tell us about the values, politics, and fears of the Anglo-Jewish community? Read more > http://online.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/doi/book/10.3828/978-1-874774-80-8

Jewish Theology and World Religions

Two of the most pervasive aspects of modern Jewish life are interaction with people of other faiths and exposure to their beliefs to a degree unknown in the past. Read more > http://online.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/doi/book/10.3828/978-1-906764-92-0

For further information:

Jennie Collinson | Head of Sales

Liverpool University Press | 4 Cambridge Street, Liverpool L69 7ZU, UK

http://www.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk

 

 

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“Re-thinking Judaism’s Encounter with the Roman Empire: Rome’s Political and Religious Challenge to Israel and its Impact on Judaism (2nd century BCE – 4th century CE”

It is with great pleasure that we announce the opening of the website for the ERC project “Re-thinking Judaism’s Encounter with the Roman Empire: Rome’s Political and Religious Challenge to Israel and its Impact on Judaism (2nd century BCE – 4th century CE” (short title: “Judaism and Rome”). To visit the website and learn about the project, please go to: judaism-and-rome.cnrs.fr

The website gives access to ancient sources connected to the theme of Roman imperialism and its reception by the provincials, providing as much information as possible: original texts, English translations, images etc.

It also provides the reader with an original and detailed commentary on each source, a service that is very rarely offered on the web, and which makes this website comparable to a rich sourcebook in Open Access.

Finally, it seeks to promote interdisciplinary discussion between scholars working on Roman history, Jewish Studies, Epigraphy, Numismatics, Classics, Patristics, History of Christianity, and any related field.

We welcome your feedback!

Katell Berthelot, PI of the ERC project “Judaism and Rome,” together with the “Judaism and Rome” team

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=acee2af912&e=4c166665d8

 

TOC: Medaon: Current Issue 10 (2016): 19 online 

We are pleased to announce that the lastest issue of the online journal Medaon – Magazin für jüdisches Leben in Forschung und Bildung has just been published:

Articles

Mike Schmeitzner
Tödlicher Hass: Antisemitismus und Judenverfolgung in Dresden 1933–1945

Anja Thiele
„Welch Wort in die Kälte gerufen“ – eine Lyrikanthologie über die Shoah im Kontext der
DDR-Erinnerungskultur

Marc Brüggemann
Der Sechstagekrieg und seine Folgen. Die Berichterstattung über palästinensischen
Terrorismus gegen Israel und das Münchener Olympia-Attentat


Education

Franziska Göpner
„Jüdische Lebenswelten in Deutschland heute“ – ein Ausstellungsbesuch

Thomas Hilger
Von gespielter Dialogverweigerung zum ernsthaften Gesprächsanlass über Anti-
semitismus – Über eine Inszenierung von Charles Lewinskys Ein ganz gewöhnlicher
Jude für das Klassenzimmer


Miscellaneous

Anna-Dorothea Ludewig und Ulrike Schneider
Biographien jüdischer Frauen: „Erlöserin der Sprache“? Nelly Sachs zum 125. Geburtstag
und zum 50. Jahrestag der Literaturnobelpreisverleihung

Carl-Eric Linsler
Moritz Adolf Spitzer (1827–1908): Am Webstuhl der Geschichte. Emanzipation,
Assimilation und jüdisches Selbstverständnis im Kaisertum Österreich aus Sicht eines
vergessenen Laienautoren


Primary Sources

Christian Lübcke
Die Affäre um den Juden Aaron Oppenheimer

Swen Steinberg
Dokumentierende Emigration. Die Berichte der sozialdemokratischen Exil-Zeitung Neuer
Vorwärts über die Deportation polnischer Jüdinnen und Juden aus dem Deutschen Reich
im Oktober 1938

Clara Sterzinger
Das Leben der Dresdner Hofjuden im Spiegel der Quellen. Handlungsoptionen und
-zwänge der jüdischen Minderheit in der Mitte des 18. Jahrhunderts

Book reviews

Katrin Neuhold: Franz Rosenzweig und die idealistische Philosophie. Versuch der
Rekonstruktion eines Missverständnisses
(Inka Sauter)

Nike Thurn: „Falsche Juden“. Performative Identitäten in der deutschsprachigen Literatur
von Lessing bis Walser
(Hans-Joachim Hahn)

Jan Schwarz: Survivors and Exiles. Yiddish Culture after the Holocaust
(Evita Wiecki)

Torsten Lattki: Benzion Kellermann – Prophetisches Judentum und Vernunftreligion
(George Y. Kohler)

Jeremy Varon: The New Life: Jewish Students of Postwar Germany
(Susanne Urban)

Stefanie Fischer: Ökonomisches Vertrauen und antisemitische Gewalt. Jüdische
Viehhändler in Mittelfranken 1919–1939
(Daniel Reupke)

Berkovitz, Jay R.: Protocols of Justice. The Pinkas of the Metz Rabbinic Court 1771–1789
(Rahel Blum)

Vanda Vitti: Transformationen jüdischer Lebenswelten nach 1989. Eine Ethnographie in
zwei slowakischen Städten
(Frank Henschel)

Peter Hallama: Nationale Helden und jüdische Opfer. Tschechische Repräsentationen des
Holocaust
(Marketa Spiritova)

Romy Langeheine: Von Prag nach New York. Hans Kohn. Eine intellektuelle Biographie
(Albrecht Spranger)

Das literarische Vermächtnis jüdischer DPs: Eine Doppelrezension.
(Matthias Springborn)

* * * *

 As an online journal Medaon offers open access to all published features.  All articles can be downloaded here: http://www.medaon.de/en/editions/most-recent-edition/.

We welcome proposals for contributions in English and German. All articles are peer-reviewed.

Founded in 2007, Medaon is being published twice a year by HATiKVA e.V. (Dresden, http://www.hatikva.de).

Contact:

Redaktion Medaon
HATiKVA e. V.
Pulsnitzer Str. 10
Dresden, 01099
Germany

Email: medaon@hatikva.de

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=dda2186342&e=171df3950b

 

The Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (FAMES), University of Cambridge, is delighted to offer the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Specialisation: Muslim-Jewish Relations) for the 2017-18 academic year.

 Apply now for the programme beginning in the 2017-18 academic year.

Disfigured by the Gaza War and the explosive rise of Islamic State, the focus of the media and of general discussion has been on conflicts between members of different religions. Muslim-Jewish Relations are viewed primarily through the prism of the Israeli-Palestinian struggle, although no two faiths are closer in their history, cultures and practice than Judaism and Islam. The present political antagonism obscures their many shared aspects and the complex relationships in the everyday encounter of Muslims and Jews, past and present. This course will approach Muslim-Jewish Relations from historical, sociological, anthropological and linguistic perspectives, providing an in-depth introduction into the topic.

The MPhil will consist of three papers each assessed by an examination or a 5,000-word essay, and a 15,000-word dissertation. The three papers, taught by Faculty members and affiliated staff, are:

Muslim-Jewish Relations, Foundations – students will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying Muslim-Jewish relations, primary sources in translation and original language, bibliographical method, objectivity in the study of interfaith relations and controversial themes.

Muslim-Jewish Relations, Special Topics – these topics will focus on contemporary issues between Jews and Muslims, and why these relations are important to understanding the position of religious minorities, faith identity and politics in the Middle East and North Africa. Comparisons will be made to Europe and the United States in order to understand how trends in the region are related to politics and social change elsewhere.

Cairo Genizah – students will be given an introduction to the Genizah manuscripts and their importance for the study of Muslim-Jewish relations in the Middle Ages. Most of the teaching will be based on a selection of Genizah texts in Hebrew or Judaeo-Arabic. These will be read in edited form and also from the original manuscripts in the Taylor-Schechter Genizah Research Unit in Cambridge (http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/Taylor-Schechter/Introduction.html).

Applicants are required to apply to the University of Cambridge by the published application deadlines (http://www.ames.cam.ac.uk/postgraduate/applying/deadlines). Applicants for this course are expected to have a university qualification in either Hebrew or Arabic. Depending on the number and quality of the applicants, the Woolf Institute, which focuses on the study of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Relations, will offer bursaries to contribute to the fees. If you plan to apply for this bursary, you must ensure that you submit your application by 7 December 2016.

For further information, contact Dr Esther-Miriam Wagner: emw36@cam.ac.uk

 

TOC: Melilah: Manchester Journal of Jewish Studies
Volume 12 (2015). Theme: Atheism, Scepticism and Challenges to Monotheism.
Proceedings of the BAJS 2015 conference.
Editor: Daniel R. Langton
www.melilahjournal.org/p/2015.html

Open Access, freely available online.

Contents:

0. Introduction.
1. Kenneth Seeskin, From Monotheism to Scepticism and Back Again.
2. Joshua Moss, Satire, Monotheism and Scepticism.
3. David Ruderman, Are Jews the Only True Monotheists? Some Critical Reflections in Jewish Thought from the Renaissance to the Present.
4. Benjamin Williams, Doubting Abraham doubting God: The Call of Abraham in the Or ha-Sekhel.
5. Károly Dániel Dobos, Shimi the Sceptical: Sceptical Voices. in an Early Modern Jewish, Anti-Christian Polemical Drama by Matityahu Nissim Terni.
6. Jeremy Fogel, Scepticism of Scepticism: On Mendelssohn’s Philosophy of Common Sense.
7. Michael Miller, Kaplan and Wittgenstein: Atheism, Phenomenology and the use of language.
8. Federico Dal Bo, Textualism and Scepticism: Post-modern Philosophy and the Theology of Text.
9. Norman Solomon, The Attenuation of God in Modern Jewish Thought.
10. Melissa Raphael, Idoloclasm: The First Task of Second Wave Liberal Jewish Feminism.
11. Daniel R. Langton, Joseph Krauskopf’s Evolution and Judaism: One Reform Rabbi’s Response to Scepticism and Materialism in Nineteenth-century North America.
12. Avner Dinur, Secular Theology as a Challenge for Jewish Atheists.
13. Khayke Beruriah Wiegand, “Why the Geese Shrieked”: Isaac Bashevis Singer’s Work between Mysticism and Sceptics.

This month’s newsflash with details of European-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://eurojewishstudies.org/jobs/position-available-administrator-of-the-european-association-for-jewish-studies/

 

 

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=09ad3086e0&e=a30e4739c7

The Department of Theology and Religious Studies of King’s College London, together with the Institute di Culture e Archeologic dell Terre Biblische of Faculty of Theology of Lugano and the University of Malta, are delighted to announce the recent success of a Leverhulme Trust International Network Grant application, for the Study of Dispersed Qumran Caves Artefacts and Archival Sources, obtained by Professor Joan Taylor (KCL’s Principal Investigator), together with Professor Marcello Fidanzio (ISCAB, Lugano) and Dr Dennis Mizzi (University of Malta).

In the Qumran caves that yielded the Dead Sea Scrolls many jars, lids and other artefacts were discovered by local Bedouin and also in joint Jordanian, French and American excavations (1949-56). Some of these material artefacts were sent to collections worldwide very early on, either gifted or sold.  Recently the École Biblique et Archéologique Française  of Jerusalem and the ISCAB Lugano started a program for the final report on the Caves of the Qumran Area, dealing mainly with the materials kept in Jerusalem and Amman. The program is directed by Pere Jean-Baptiste Humbert  (EBAF) and Marcello Fidanzio (ISCAB).  The network for the Dispersed Qumran Caves Artefacts and Archival Sources would engage with this publication project, by facilitating the study of all the dispersed artefacts enabling more comprehensive new reports.  This will provide more information about the Qumran cave artefacts, and contribute to reconstructing a material profile of each cave’s contents. Alongside the analysis of ceramic jars, lids, textiles, leathers and wooden remains, the network will additionally explore the written and photographic dossiers of archaeologists and visitors.

Anyone with photographs from the 1950s or relevant information is invited to get in touch by contacting the Network Facilitator, Dr. Sandra Jacobs, at sandra.jacobs@kcl.ac.uk.  Further details of the award are available at: https://www.leverhulme.ac.uk/news/newsletter

EDITORS:

Dr hab. Prof. UP Sławomir Kapralski, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny w Krakowie and Professor Larry Ray, SSPSSR, University of Kent, UK

The politics of Holocaust memory in Poland has for many decades been an arena of dispute. The German occupation in Poland destroyed the largest pre-War Jewish population in the world and the Germans further placed six extermination camps in occupied Polish territory. While post-War Poland inevitably became a major site of Holocaust memory and commemoration this has always been entangled with contemporary Polish and international politics, both in the Communist and post-Communist periods. This Special Issue of the journal invites contributions on any aspect of disputed Holocaust memory in Poland. Topics might include (but are not limited to):

  • Communist era memory and commemoration of the Holocaust
  • The disputes about the Auschwitz Museum as a site of commemoration
  • Disputes in post-Communist commemoration, such as the Jedwabne controversy
  • Contemporary official historical politics in Poland and its impact on the representation of the Holocaust
  • Counter-memories and the construction of Polish history from abroad for example Israeli youth voyages to Poland
  • The dispute over Poles as rescuers vs Poles as betrayers
  • Beyond the generation of survivors? How is the politics of Holocaust memory transformed by the passing of the survivor generation?
  • Holocaust memory on the local level: local commemorations and practices of remembrance
  • The Holocaust in contemporary Polish cinema, theatre, fine arts, and popular culture
  • Contemporary initiatives in the field of Holocaust education
  • Polish encounters with the globalized Holocaust discourse

 

A typical article will contain 8,000–12,000 words including endnotes.

Please submit to the Special Issue editors an abstract of about 100 words by July 1st 2016

Each manuscript should have 3-6 keywords

For complete instructions on submitting a manuscript, please click here or visit the journal website http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rhos20#.VznO2Y-cHIU

Final date for submission June 30th 2017

If you have any queries or wish to discuss this Call, please contact the Special Issue Editors:

Larry Ray l.j.ray@kent.ac.uk

Sławomir Kapralski Kapral@up.krakow.pl

 

 

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=eb2543f9e1&e=a30e4739c7

The British Library Hebrew Manuscripts space  http://bit.ly/1XGMWMd contains articles based on digitised Hebrew manuscripts in our collection, and other relevant content.

Hebrew-Manuscripts_eflyer_12.jpg

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=deb5e801c0&e=a30e4739c7

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=73fc57a12d&e=a30e4739c7

 

Preface by Cathy S. Gelbin and Raphael Gross

I. Austrian, Jewish, German, Czech: Reframing Max Brod and Prague Zionism Introduction by Mark H. Gelber

Abraham Rubin, Max Brod and Hans-Joachim Schoeps: Literary Collaborators, Ideological Rivals
Sebastian Schirrmeister, On Not Writing Hebrew: Max Brod and the ‘Jewish Poet of the German Tongue’ between Prague and Tel Aviv

II. Religion

Mathias Berek, Neglected German-Jewish Visions for a Pluralistic Society: Moritz Lazarus
Nick Block, On Nathan Birnbaum’s Messianism and Translating the Jewish Other
Thomas Gertzen, “To Become a German and Nothing but a German…”. The Role of Paul de Lagarde in the Conversion of Egyptologist Georg Steindorff
Andreas Losch, What is behind God’s Name? Martin Buber’s and Franz Rosenzweig’s Reflections on the Name of God
Anna Novikov, Leo Baeck and Leon Ader: Friendship Reflected in Correspondence

III. Poetry and Theatre

Klaus Hödl, Der kleine Kohn on the Jewish Stage
Lilach Nethanel, Poetics of Distance: Zalman Shneour in Berlin during the First World War and its Aftermath
Ari Linden, Staging German-Jewish Exile in Else Lasker-Schüler’s IchundIch.

IV. Jewish Life after the Holocaust

Lisa Silverman, Art of Loss: Madame d’Ora, Photography, and the Restitution of House Doranna
Jannis Panagiotidis, A Policy for the Future: German-Jewish Remigrants, their Children, and the Politics of Israeli Nation-Building
David Shneer, Yiddish Music and East German Antifascism: Lin Jaldati, Postwar Jewish Culture, and the Cold War

V. Memoir

Rabbi Steven Schwarzschild’s Reports from Berlin 1948-1950; introduction by Atina Grossmann
A Note on Steven Schwarzschild and the Letters from Berlin, by Maimon Schwarzschild
Rabbi Steven Schwarzschild’s Reports from Berlin
Heinrich Nuhn, “Like Hunted Animals”. The November 1938 Pogroms in Rotenburg an der Fulda: Henny Rothschild’s Letter from 18 October 1939

VI. List of Contributors
VII. Index
Illustrations

http://leobaeck.oxfordjournals.org/content/current

We are pleased to announce a new digital resource, the Josephus Reception Archive:  http://josephus.orinst.ox.ac.uk/archive/jra.

We hope you will visit it and find it useful. We warmly welcome feedback and offers of participation in the future development of the JRA.

The online platform presents concise information about the reception of Josephus to scholars, students, and indeed anyone with an interest in the subject. It is meant to engage, enlighten and assist a wide public of readers and investigators in many fields. Students of history and of literature, of Judaism and of Christianity, of the reception of the Classical world, of culture and of political thought, of art and of music, and should all find here answers to questions that arise in their researches and in their reading.

The online archive in this initial stage reflects the parameters of the AHRC Project on the Reception of Josephus in Jewish Culture since 1750 (2012-5). Many of its contributors participated in the four Workshops that we held during 2012-4 at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. You can learn more about the Project via the Home Page of the website.

The JRA has been set up by Prof Tessa Rajak and Dr Annelies Cazemier. It is currently maintained with the assistance of Dr Michal Molcho.

For further information, or if you have any specific suggestions for material to be included in the JRA, or wish to contribute in any way, please contact us at: jr@orinst.ox.ac.uk.

Martin Goodman, Tessa Rajak, Andrea Schatz

The Journal of Jewish Studies publishes a supplement series. Supplements may take the form of monographs, conference proceedings, or collected works on a particular theme.

We welcome proposals for our Supplement series. Any book length, from 50,000 words upwards, will be considered. All our publications are peer-reviewed. Submissions should be sent to the Executive Editor.

For guidance on style, please check our Style guide, which also includes information on reproduction of images, abbreviations, transliterations and copyrights.

Supplements link is: http://www.jjs-online.net/supplements

The executive editor link mail to: jjsadm@ochjs.ac.uk

Style guide link is: http://www.jjs-online.net/authors/style_guide

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=fd9a99c731&e=a30e4739c7

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=35929117e2&e=a30e4739c7

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=833dda3f87&e=a30e4739c7

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=c3cea91dea&e=a30e4739c7

In response to the recent advert by a number of British academics to cease co-operating with Israeli Universities the British Association for Jewish Studies (BAJS), representing scholars of many backgrounds and a variety of perspectives on the State of Israel, deplores any attempt to weaken educational links with Higher Education institutions in Israel. We believe that such actions contradict the aims of scholarship and the mission of an academic body, and do not contribute to the resolution of the conflict. BAJS will continue to promote and strengthen educational links with Higher Education institutions in Israel.

It is with a great sense of sadness that we have learnt of the death of the eminent historian of Anglo-Jewish history and the Holocaust, David Cesarani (1956-2015). David was Research Professor in History at Royal Holloway, University of London, and a leading figure behind the re-invigoration of Anglo-Jewish history in the 1990s. He played a seminal role in the development of Holocaust Studies in the UK from his time as Director of the Wiener Library (London), and then as Director of the Parkes Institute for the Study of Jewish/non-Jewish Relations at the University of Southampton. He has written and edited over 15 books including Major Farran’s Hat: Murder, Scandal, and Britain’s War against Jewish Terrorism, 1945-1948 (2009), Eichmann: His Life and Crimes (2004), Arthur Koestler: The Homeless Mind (1998),The ‘Jewish Chronicle’ and Anglo-Jewry 1841-1991 (1994) and Justice Delayed: How Britain Became a Refuge for Nazi War Criminals (1992). David has been involved with policy making and advocacy organisations since the mid-1980s when he was lead researcher for the All Party Parliamentary War Crimes Group which produced a report in 1987 on the entry of Nazi collaborators into the UK after 1945. He subsequently championed the 1992 War Crimes Act. David argued for the establishment of a Holocaust museum in the UK and served on the advisory board working with the team that created the acclaimed permanent exhibition on the Holocaust at the Imperial War Museum which opened in 2000. For several years he served on the UK delegation to the International Task Force for Holocaust Remembrance, Education and Research. In 2005 he was awarded the OBE for his work with the Home Office unit responsible for the establishment of Holocaust Memorial Day in the UK. David was a member of the Council of the Jewish Historical Society and an academic adviser to the Jewish Museum, London. He contributed to the making of numerous TV, radio and film documentaries as a researcher, historical consultant, interviewee, and most recently as an associate producer. David was very much a public face of Jewish Studies in the UK, and his dynamism will be sorely missed. May his memory be for a blessing.

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=f1d1cae560&e=a30e4739c7

This book publishes original and peer-reviewed research contributions first presented at the BAJS conference 2013 at the University of Kent, Canterbury. It explores how modern Jewish identity and notions of belonging are shaped by boundaries. The drawing of boundaries has always been a key part of the Jewish tradition and has served to maintain a distinctive Jewish identity. At the same time, these boundaries have consistently been subject to negotiation, transgression and contestation. The increasing fragmentation of Judaism into competing claims to membership, from Orthodox adherence to secular identities, has brought striking new dimensions to this complex interplay of boundaries and modes of identity and belonging in contemporary Judaism.

Boundaries, Identity and Belonging in Modern Judaism addresses these new dimensions, bringing together experts in the field to explore the various and fluid modes of expressing and defining Jewish identity in the modern world. Its interdisciplinary scholarship opens new perspectives on the prominent questions challenging scholars in Jewish Studies. Beyond simply being born Jewish, observance of Judaism has become a lifestyle choice and active assertion. Addressing the demographic changes brought by population mobility and ‘marrying out,’ as well as the complex relationships between Israel and the Diaspora, this book reveals how these shifting boundaries play out in a global context, where Orthodoxy meets innovative ways of defining and acquiring Jewish identity.

Contents: 

INTRODUCTION Larry Ray and Maria Diemling 

1HOMELAND, EXILE AND THE BOUNDARIES OF JEWISH IDENTITY David Biale 

2. VARIETIES OF JEWISH POLITICAL IDENTITY: NOTES ON HANNAH ARENDT’S JEWISH WRITINGS Robert Fine 

3. IDENTITY AND NEGOTIATION OF BOUNDARIES AMONG YOUNG POLISH JEWS Joanna Cukras-Stelągowska 

4. SHADES OF CLOSENESS. BELONGING AND BECOMING IN A CONTEMPORARY POLISH JEWISH COMMUNITY Jan Lorenz 

5. MIMICRY, TRANSLATION AND BOUNDARIES OF JEWISHNESS IN THE SOVIET UNION Klavdia Smola 

6. ‘WHICH SELF?’ JEWISH IDENTITY IN THE CHILD-CENTRED HOLOCAUST NOVEL Lia Deromedi 

7. REALITY GAPS: NEGOTIATING THE BOUNDARIES OF BRITISH JEWISH IDENTITIES IN CONTEMPORARY FICTION Ruth Gilbert 

8. DEVIANCE, POLYVALENCE AND MUSICAL ‘THIRD SPACE’: NEGOTIATING BOUNDARIES OF JEWISHNESS AT PALESTINIAN HIP HOP PERFORMANCES IN THE TEL AVIV-YAFO UNDERGROUND Miranda Crowdus 

9. “DON’T BE A STRANGER”: GIYUR AS A THEOLOGISATION OF THE BOUNDARIES OF (JEWISH) IDENTITY Nechama Hadari 

10. ‘HANDS ACROSS THE TEA’: RE-NEGOTIATING JEWISH IDENTITY AND BELONGING IN POST-WAR SUBURBAN BRITAIN Hannah Ewence 

11. “I ALWAYS FELT ON THE EDGE OF THINGS AND NOT REALLY PART OF IT”: FUZZY BOUNDARIES IN AN EXTENDED SCOTTISH JEWISH FAMILY Fiona Frank 

12. PROBING THE BOUNDARIES OF JEWISHNESS AND ISRAELI IDENTITY – THE SITUATION OF NON-JEWISH PARTNERS AND SPOUSES OF ISRAELI JEWS Dani Kranz 

13. PUSHING THE BOUNDARIES: CONTEMPORARY JEWISH CRITICS OF ISRAEL AND ZIONISM Dashiel Lawrence 

14. CONJURING CRYPTO-JEWS IN NEW MEXICO: VIOLATING ETHNIC, SCHOLARLY AND ETHICAL BOUNDARIES Judith Neulander

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=5c54f26039&e=a30e4739c7

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=09528711bb&e=a30e4739c7

 

Watch Professor David Ruderman’s keynote lecture ‘Are Jews the Only True Monotheists? Some Critical Reflections in Jewish Thought from the Renaissance to the Present’

 

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=ee87c1875b&e=a30e4739c7

For issue no. 31 of Nashim, under the consulting editorship of Lisa Fishbayn Joffe of the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute Project on Gender, Culture, Religion and the Law and Haim Sperber of Western Galilee College, the editors of Nashim invite proposals for articles exploring the ways in which spouses, communal organizations, rabbinical authorities and civil courts have struggled to achieve their objectives with regard to religious divorce.

Women’s inferiority in access to religious divorce and to property and support upon separation or divorce has plagued Jewish communities for centuries. Desperation in the face of impoverishment and barriers to remarriage have led women to seek remedies from civil courts, communal agencies and religious leaders – and even to resort to anti-social conduct in order to maintain themselves and their dependents. These trends have been exacerbated by migration and the challenges it poses to reconstituting family and communal life.

There have always been agunot, but the shape of this problem has changed over time. The classical agunah, whose husband could not consent to divorce because he was missing or mentally incompetent, has been overtaken by a new type of agunah., whose husband is physically present and mentally sound but uses his power to withhold a religious divorce as a bargaining chip in divorce negotiations. Stakeholders have struggled to respond to these developments while advancing their distinct and overlapping interests, be they in the preservation of their legal jurisdictions and pastoral legitimacy, in protection of freedom of religion and advancing gender equality, or in stewarding philanthropic resources to provide for female-led families.

Possible topics for proposed submissions may include (but are not confined to):

  • historical responses to the agunah problem in jurisdictions around the world;
  • historical accounts of the impact of civil marriage on Jewish divorce practices;
  • the roles of women as single parents and heads of families, especially during periods of migration;
  • the impact of migration on Jewish family forms
  • the role of Jewish communal agencies, activists and religious leaders in addressing the plight of single mothers and associated economic and social disadvantages;
  • socio-legal analyses of disputes regarding Jewish divorce in civil and religious courts;
  • socio-legal analyses of contemporary strategies to address the agunah problem through the use of prenuptial contracts or civil suits;
  • analyses of changing discourse around the agunah issue and links to domestic violence;
  • links between spousal abandonment, social delinquency, prostitution and sex trafficking involving the Jewish community;
  • strategies or identities of key actors in the contemporary struggle around agunot. 

Proposals for submissions of up to 12,000 words, not previously published or under consideration for publication elsewhere, should be sent to Deborah Greniman, Managing Editor of Nashim, by July 1, 2015, at nashim@schechter.ac.il. Final date for submission of articles: November 1, 2015. All scholarly articles will be subject to peer review. Academic Editor of Nashim: Renée Levine Melammed.

Nashim is published jointly by the Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies, the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute and Indiana University Press.

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=1dac463298&e=a30e4739c7

A conference on the theme of ‘Atheism, Scepticism and Challenges to Monotheism’ will be hosted at the University of Manchester 5-7 July under the auspices of the British Association for Jewish Studies: www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/bajs-conference/

There are now some limited funds to cover the conference fee for postgraduate students who wish to attend the conference but who are NOT planning to give a paper. Please contact Prof. Daniel Langton (daniel.r.langton@manchester.ac.uk) if this interests you.

The process would be (i) join BAJS as a student/associate member (depending on whether you are based in the UK or outside the UK), and (ii) receive the reimbursement of the student/associate member conference fee after the conference (£55/100 for two days or £30/50 for one day). Please note that the deadline for registering is Fri 29 May.

Conference registration details:

www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/bajs-registration/

BAJS membership details:

https://britishjewishstudies.org/about/join-bajs/

Please feel free to forward this call to interested fellow postgraduate students in the UK and beyond.

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=12be059ff6&e=a30e4739c7

The Oxford Biblical Hebrew Summer School will take place at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies in the Clarendon Institute Building in Oxford on September 1-11, 2015.

The school offers nine days of intensive teaching in biblical Hebrew. Each weekday there will be 3 hours of teaching, delivered in two separate 90 minute sessions, between 10:00 and 16:00.

The course corresponds to a term of intensive teaching for a full-time university student. It is open to students with or without experience of the language. The course is very demanding and the instructors will expect students to spend at least 4 hours per day in private study.

Applications should be submitted by Sunday May 31, 2015. Places are limited.

Please include in your application contact information for one academic referee.

The cost of the school is £200 per student for 27 hours of language instruction. This does not include any textbooks/workbooks, which the student will be expected to acquire for him/herself. The school is non-residential and there is no teaching at the weekends.

Successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date.

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=12be059ff6&e=a30e4739c7

Registration is now open:

www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/bajs-registration/

Please note that there are limited places for accommodation booked via the registration form and that these will be allocated on a first-come-first-served basis. The deadline for registration is Friday 29 May 2015.

Theme: Jewish Studies and New Testament

www.melilahjournal.org/p/2014.html

Open Access, freely available online.

Contents:

1. Marc Zvi Brettler and Amy-Jill Levine, The Jewish Annotated New Testament: Retrospect and Prospects.  

2. Anders Runesson, Saving the Lost Sheep of the House of Israel: Purity, Forgiveness, and Synagogues in the Gospel of Matthew.  

3. Jody A. Barnard, Anti-Jewish Interpretations of Hebrews: Some Neglected Factors.  

4. Etka Liebowitz, Hypocrites or Pious Scholars? The Image of the Pharisees in Second Temple Period Texts and Rabbinic Literature.  

5. Pere Casanellas and Harvey J. Hames, A Textual and Contextual Analysis of the Hebrew Gospels translated from Catalan.

Editors: Daniel R. Langton and Renate Smithuis

Editorial assistant: Simon Mayers

Centre for Jewish Studies
University of Manchester
www.melilahjournal.org

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=9bd35ad0e7&e=a30e4739c7

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=6dc625f03e&e=a30e4739c7

Contents

Preface by Cathy S. Gelbin and Raphael Gross

I.              Jews and Citizenship

Introduction by Andreas Braemer and Gideon Reuveni

Gideon Reuveni, Emancipation through Consumption: Moses Mendelssohn and the Idea of Marketplace Citizenship

Michal Szulc, A Gracious Act or Merely a Regulation of Economic Activity? A Daily Life Perspective on the Reception of the Prussian Emancipation Edict of 1812

Miriam Rürup, The Citizen and its Other – Zionist and Israeli Responses to Statelessness

II.             German-speaking Jews and the Politics of Antisemitism

David Meola, German Jews and the Local German Press: The Jewish Struggle for Acceptance in Constance, 1846.

Lisa Zwicker, Conservative Ideological Resurgence, Mass Nationalist Rallying, and Students’ Status Anxiety: The German Burschenschaft’s Antisemitic Resolution of 1896 

Stephanie Seul, Transnational Press Discourses on German Antisemitism during the Weimar Republic: The Riots in Berlin’s Scheunenviertel, 1923

III.           Language, Philosophy and Culture

Gertrud Reershemius, Language as the main protagonist? East Frisian Yiddish in the writing of Isaac Herzberg

Susanne Hillman, “A Few Human Beings Walking Hand in Hand”: Margarete Susman, Leonhard Ragaz, and the Origins of the Jewish-Christian Dialogue in Zurich

Uri Ganani, The Politics of Arabella: Post-Wagnerian Opera and the German-Jewish Quest for Lyrical Individualism, 1928-1933

IV.          After the Holocaust

Dov Schidorski, Hannah Arendt’s Dedication to Salvaging Jewish Culture

Jonathan Zatlin, Repetition and Loss: Jewish Refugees and German Communists after the Holocaust, 1945-1951

V.           Austrian Film and Literature

Nicholas Baer, The Rebirth of a Nation: Cinema, Herzlian Zionism, and Emotion in Jewish History

Katya Krylova, Melancholy Journeys in the Films of Ruth Beckermann

Andrea Reiter, The appropriation of Myth as language in Julya Rabinowich’s Jewish novels

VI.          List of Contributors

VII.         Index

Illustrations

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=cdeb5a371a&e=a30e4739c7

The University of Manchester has recently announced the decision to close language provision in modern Hebrew, Persian and Turkish at degree level, along with the withdrawal of ten Middle Eastern Studies degree programmes. In addition to losing this valuable provision of Jewish Studies and related degrees, there are also associated staffing changes namely termination of two temporary contracts, in Persian and Turkish, and the ending (through retirement or otherwise) of two permanent contracts in modern Hebrew.

At the request of colleagues in Manchester, the committee have written to the management at the University of Manchester in protest, highlighting the responsibility that universities have to protect so-called ‘minority’ subjects and ensure their continued intellectual vitality, especially when they remain central to the wider advancement of knowledge and understanding of global challenges. We also raised that the closure of such programmes will have serious implications for the future development of the academic field of Jewish Studies in the UK. You can read the full letter on the BAJS website.

We write now to ask for your support in this protest. We have set up a petition and we need our members to sign it and encourage others across the wider academic community to do so. We hope to reach all those with an interest in protecting Jewish Studies, or indeed other small subject areas, so we would be hugely grateful if you could circulate this petition as widely as possible.

The petition will be open until the end of January and the full text is: https://www.change.org/p/university-of-manchester-protect-modern-hebrew-and-middle-eastern-studies-at-the-university-of-manchester

You can sign it here: https://www.change.org/p/university-of-manchester-protect-modern-hebrew-and-middle-eastern-studies-at-the-university-of-manchester

The Committee and colleagues at the University of Manchester are most grateful for your support in this action to protect teaching in Jewish Studies.

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=8f44b73a88&e=a30e4739c7

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://eepurl.com/7t3uf

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=26c7159aed&e=a30e4739c7

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=943896eb5e4479529ebbaffc7&id=a5d16ad2b7&e=a30e4739c7

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: http://eurojewishstudies.org/info/monthly-newsflash/

The 2014 Sherman Lectures at the University of Manchester are now available to view online. Miri Rubin, Professor of Medieval and Early Modern History at Queen Mary University of London, speaks on ‘Thinking about Jews in Medieval Europe: Explorations with Text, Images and Sounds’ . The lectures are entitled:

  1. People and Places,
  2. The Jewish Body,
  3. Jews and Children, and
  4. Jews and Material Christianity.

www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/sherman-lectures-2014/

Melilah: A Volume of Studies was founded by Edward Robertson and Meir Wallenstein, and published (in Hebrew) by Manchester University Press from 1944 to 1955. Five substantial volumes were produced before the series was discontinued. In his editorial foreword to the first edition, Robertson explained that Melilah had been established to promote Jewish scholarship in the face of the threat posed by the Second World War and its aftermath. The title of the journal refers to the ears of corn that are plucked to rub in the hands before the grains can be eaten (Deut. 23:25).  The five volume series has now been digitized and is available online: www.melilahjournal.org/p/index-original-series.html

The British Association for Jewish Studies (BAJS), representing scholars of many backgrounds and a variety of perspectives on the State of Israel, deplores any attempt to weaken educational links with Israeli institutions or individuals. We believe that such actions contradict the aims of scholarship and the mission of an academic body, and do not ultimately contribute to the resolution of the conflict. BAJS will continue to promote and strengthen educational links with Israeli institutions and individuals.