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9 May 2017, University of Durham

Elad Lapidot (Freie Universität Berlin), Deterritorialized Immigrant: The Talmudic Ger as a Cross-Border Figure

Ilan Baron (University of Durham), The International Cultural Politics of Israeli Cuisine

Elad Lapidot Ger is a non-Jew who becomes a Jew – a convert or more literality a proselyte, a new-comer. As such, the ger is a Jewish cross-border figure, the immigrant. In my talk I will reflect on the cross-border performance of the ger in the basic rabbinic text, the Talmud. Through several readings, I will look at ways in which the ger opens up inside the Talmudic texture a space of reflection on the borders – and core – of the rabbinic socio-political project, i.e. ‘Israel’. The immigrant ger, initially an outsider, will be unveiled as a paradigm of the rabbinic subject. The guiding question will concern the nature of the space in which the cross-border event of the ger takes place, namely the topo-logy of rabbinic Israel. The basic observation will be the shift from the highly territorial narrative of the biblical text to deterritorialized Talmud. The Talmudic ger will emerge as a pivotal figure for thinking borders, immigration and place in conditions of deterritorialization.

Ilan Baron In the past four years, at least sixteen Israeli cookbooks have been published in English. By itself, this is not an especially interesting number, but considering that prior to 2012 I have been able to identity only ten English-language Israeli cookbooks (excluding local community cookbooks with “Israeli” recipes), this increase provides an opportunity to explore the international cultural politics of the Jewish State. The cookbooks reflect the movements and migrations of Jews, of the various locations that have come to contribute to Jewish culture and which are manifest in the diverse array of foods that in these books have come to be described as “Israeli”.  This article explores the narratives produced in these Israeli cookbooks, suggesting that they provide a particular normative story about Israel’s history, identity, and values that is of relevance both for the Israelization of Diaspora Jewish identity and for how the idea of Israel is (re)produced as a cultural good for international consumption. Using contemporary political theory, and building on the hermeneutic and phenomenological traditions in continental philosophy, this articles provides a critique of the normative narratives produced in these cookbooks.

The Cambridge Debate – The Future of Faith: Leading the Modern Place of Worship, 27 April, 2017

This debate, organised by the Baroness Warsi Foundation, the Woolf Institute, and the Von Hügel Institute brings together future faith leaders to explore modern places of worship.

The panel and audience will consider these areas and explore the following questions:

  • What does the church / synagogue / mosque of today (and tomorrow) look like?
  • What challenges will your congregation face?
  • Is a physical place of worship still necessary?
  • In what way could the integration of technology support (and hinder) your work?

Panellists are:

  • Rabbi Shlomo Shagalow (Chabad of Cambridge)
  • Ben Bell (Senior Student, Westcott House)
  • Isaac Wharton (Novice, Dominican Order)
  • Shams Tameez (Imam of High Wycombe mosque, graduate of

Jamia al Karam, Retford and Cambridge Muslim College)

Thursday 27th April 2017, 5:00 – 7:00pm

At St Edmund’s College, Garden Room

 For further information contact: Claire Curran

cc640@cam.ac.uk

 

 http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk

Postgraduate and Early Career Workshop, University of Manchester

For UK-based Jewish Studies research postgraduates and early career researchers. The Centre for Jewish Studies at Manchester University is pleased to announce the second postgraduate research training event of the Northern UK Jewish Studies Partnership.

PhD students and post-doctoral researchers from the Jewish Studies Partnership institutions and other universities in the UK are invited to participate in a range of training and information sessions on 4-6 July 2017 at the University of Manchester. The event will include advice sessions on funding applications, public engagement and REF2021, career planning for library, museum and publishing sectors, tips for submitting for publication, as well as a series of sessions on Current Trends in Jewish Studies and, for example, Cultural Studies, Israel Studies, Social Science, and Holocaust Studies.

For details including the registration form (deadline: 1 June 2017), funding assistance, accommodation options, and the provisional programme, see www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/n-uk-js-partnership/

Co-sponsored by USTC and the School of History

Venue: Old Class Library, School of History, 69 South Street, St Andrews
Time: 2-4pm

Adam Shear (University of Pittsburgh), Jews and their Books on the Move in Early Modern Europe

Emily Finer (University of St Andrews), Jewish Migration and Metamorphosis in Early Soviet Fiction

Adam Shear is Associate Professor of Religious Studies and History and Director of the Program in Jewish Studies at the University of Pittsburgh where he has taught since 2001. His 2008 book The Kuzari and the Shaping of Jewish Identity, 1167-1900 (Cambridge University Press) was awarded a National Jewish Book Award for Scholarship and the Morris D. Forkosch Prize from the Journal of the History of Ideas for the best first book in intellectual history.

The early modern period in European and Mediterranean history is often seen as a period of increased mobility of people.  The rise of print is also seen as a distinctive element of early modernity.  In Jewish history, these two factors have been cited by many historians as key aspects of the early modern Jewish experience, most recently by David Ruderman in his Early Modern Jewry: A New Cultural History (Princeton, 2011). Although historians of migration and historians of the book have paid due diligence to the relationships between the two factors, this talk will more explicitly analyze the ways in which movement of Jewish books are linked to the mobility patterns of early modern Jews. In addition to looking at the pre-publication sharing of texts in new environments, the paper also considers the dissemination of books after publication and over time. The goal is to better understand how the history of migration is linked to the history of the book and how new tools in each subfield can complement knowledge in the other.

Emily Finer is Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Russian at the University of St Andrews where she convened the new degree in Comparative Literature. She is currently working on a second monograph exploring the vast cultural reception of Charles Dickens and his works in the Russian-speaking world. This project follows her monograph on the twisty relationship between the Russian Formalist, Viktor Shklovskii and the author of Tristram Shandy, Laurence Sterne: Turning into Sterne: Viktor Shklovskii and Literary Reception (Oxford: Legenda, 2010).

For a few years after the 1917 Revolution, Russian-Jewish writers felt empowered to explore issues of identity in print. Lev Lunts, a young writer who resisted his parents’ pleas to join them in emigration, chose instead to imagine a journey west in Crossing the Border (1922). His Jewish characters employ a range of linguistic and visual disguises which are ultimately unsuccessful. In Homeland (1923), Lunts’s atheist student goes through a door under the Choral Synagogue in Petersburg only to find himself in biblical Babylon. These and the similar stories to be discussed all end with the restoration of the status quo, but their writers test the limits of comedy and satire through their use of anti-Semitic stereotypes, making peculiar demands on the contemporary reader.

Venue: A113 Samuel Alexander Building, University of Manchester
Time: 5-7pm

Sander Gilman (Emory University), Jews as Exiles and their Representations after 1933

Cathy Gelbin (University of Manchester), German Jews and the Cosmopolitan Ideal in Exile from National Socialism

Sander Gilman is a distinguished professor of the Liberal Arts and Sciences as well as Professor of Psychiatry at Emory University. A cultural and literary historian, he is the author or editor of over eighty books. His Obesity: The Biography appeared with Oxford University Press in 2010; his most recent edited volume, The Third Reich Sourcebook (with Anson Rabinbach) was published with the University of California Press in 2013, He is the author of the basic study of the visual stereotyping of the mentally ill, Seeing the Insane, published by John Wiley and Sons in 1982 (reprinted: 1996) as well as the standard study of Jewish Self-Hatred, the title of his Johns Hopkins University Press monograph of 1986.

In our age when the meanings associated with ‘exile’ and ‘asylum’ are radically shifting, it is valuable to examine how those not directly impacted came to understand such a political alteration after 1933. The transformation of European cosmopolitan intellectuals, at home in the world but also confortable with their role in high German culture, into exiles and asylum seekers was sudden and often unpleasant.  By late January 1933, such cosmopolitans, especially those publically identified as Jews or ‘political’ (or both) began to see their status changing, even prior to the introduction of punitive laws under the new Nazi state.  I shall examine two cases of how these exiles were seen by non-Jews in radically different political spaces:  Thomas Mann in exile writing his Joseph novels and Martin Heidegger, suddenly placed in a position of leadership in the new Nazi state, commenting in his ‘Black’ notebooks about Jews. I shall also think about what such positions mean for ‘Others,’ Jews and Germans (or both) in our age of the demonization of exiles and asylum seekers.

Cathy Gelbin is a Senior Lecturer in German Studies at the University of Manchester. She specializes in German-Jewish culture, Holocaust Studies, gender and film. She is co-editor of the Oxford journal Leo Baeck Institute Year Book for the Study of German-Jewish History and Culture and serves on the Board of Directors and Trustees of the Leo Baeck Institute London, as well as on the selection committee of Studienstiftung’s international Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme in German-Jewish Studies. Recent publications include The Golem Returns: From German Romantic Literature to Global Jewish Culture (2011) and Jewish Culture in the Age of Globalization (2014, co-ed. with Sander L. Gilman).

The brief period between the two world wars saw concerted efforts by liberal and leftist-leaning German and Austrian Jewish writers to promote the cosmopolitan ideal. For a little over a century, the cosmopolitan dream of a united Europe had been nascent among Christian and Jewish intellectuals in the German-speaking realm. Following the nationalist disaster of World War I and the rise of antisemitism throughout the 1920s, the cosmopolitanist project assumed particular urgency for Jewish intellectuals. My talk examines the changes in cosmopolitanist attitudes that exile from National Socialism effected among German-Jewish writers and intellectuals, including Joseph Roth, Stefan Zweig and Lion Feuchtwanger.

Pears Institute – Spring 2017 Events

An intimate view of evil? How German Jews made sense of Nazi perpetrators

Holocaust Memorial Day Event – Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism in collaboration with the Institute of Historical Research

Speaker: Professor Mark Roseman, Indiana University Bloomington

Date: Wednesday 1 February 2017

Time: 6.30-8.00pm

Venue: Wolfson Conference Suite, Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

After years of focusing on policy and perpetrators, historians of the Holocaust have begun to give victims’ experience more attention. But we have been surprisingly slow to ask how victims viewed the perpetrators. Jews from Germany were in some ways best placed to understand the Nazis – they shared the same language and national background after all, and had anxiously observed them evolve. At the same time, they, more than any other victims, were forced to confront painful questions about how the culture in which they had taken such pride had produced the barbarians who now confronted them. How did they make sense of the “perpetrators from next door”?

Mark Roseman is a historian of modern Europe, with particular interests in the History of the Holocaust and in modern German history. Current research projects include a critical synthesis of recent work on Nazi perpetrators, and a project looking at a life-reform and resistance group in Germany 1920-2000.

For further information please visit: http://www.pearsinstitute.bbk.ac.uk/events/events-calendar/an-intimate-view-of-evil-how-german-jews-made-sense-of-nazi-perpetrators/

 
Public Lecture: ‘The Meanings of Antisemitism’

Speaker: Professor David Feldman, Birkbeck, University of London

Date: Monday 13 February 2017
Time: 6.30-8.00pm

Venue: Birkbeck University of London, Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 7HX. Room B34, Malet Street

Antisemitism has figured in British political debates in the last year as never before. In this lecture, David Feldman examines the changing meanings of antisemitism since the term was first coined. He reveals a new history of the Jews’ struggle for equality from the late-nineteenth century and explains why the politics of antisemitism today generate so much controversy.

David Feldman is Director of the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism and also a Professor of History at Birkbeck, University of London. He is currently writing an intellectual and political history of the concept of antisemitism in Britain from its introduction in the 1880s to the present.

For further information please visit: http://www.pearsinstitute.bbk.ac.uk/events/events-calendar/the-meanings-of-antisemitism/

 

Denial – Painful Pasts and Hidden Histories

Film screenings with panel discussion

Date: Sunday, 26 March 2016

Time: All day: two films and discussion. The films will be shown back to back with a break for lunch. You may come for the whole day, to either film screening (morning or afternoon), or join us for the final panel discussion that follows – see below for details

  • 10.45 – 12.25 Film screening: My Nazi Legacy
  • 12.30 – 1.15 Discussion with Philippe Sands
  • 1.15 – 2.15 Lunch
  • 2.15 – 4.00 Film screening: The Flat
  • 4.15 – 5.30 Panel discussion about both films

Venue: Birkbeck, University of London, Birkbeck Cinema, 43 Gordon Square, Bloomsbury, London WC1H OPD

Speakers: Professor Stephen Frosh, Birkbeck, University of London, Professor Catherine Hall, University College London, Professor Daniel Pick, Birkbeck, University of London and Professor Philippe Sands QC, University College London.

The Pears Institute explores, through two powerful documentaries, the ways individuals and generations deal with the discovery of uncomfortable family truths – the past actions of parents and grandparents; and the challenge of confronting them.

In the panel discussion, speakers will consider the questions the films raise about memory and legacy within families. How do individuals cope with evil, deceit or betrayal of other family members? Do men react differently from women? Do different generations react differently? How do the actions of past lives colour the lives of those in the present? Should descendants acknowledge or apologise for wrong-doings of others? And how does one think about conscious deception as opposed to unconscious denial and disavowal?

For further information please visit: http://www.pearsinstitute.bbk.ac.uk/events/events-calendar/denial-painful-pasts-and-hidden-histories/

 

Public Lecture, ‘The Ghetto of Venice: Past, Present, Future’

Speaker: Professor Shaul Bassi, Ca’Foscari University of Venice

Date: Monday 27 March 2017

Time: 6.30-8.00pm

Venue: Birkbeck University of London, Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 7HX. Room B33, Malet Street (Torrington Square entrance).

The word ghetto was coined in Venice in 1516, it was later applied to other Jewish areas in Italy and Western Europe. By the second half of the twentieth-century ghetto became synonymous with ethnic segregation especially in the United States. This lecture looks at the history of the Ghetto of Venice and discusses the present challenges and future prospects of an iconic Jewish heritage site that has just celebrated 500 years of continuous existence and embodies the predicament of a city threatened increasingly by a “tourist monoculture”.

Shaul Bassi is associate professor of English at Ca’Foscari University of Venice. His research interests include Shakespeare and Jewish studies. He is co-founder and Italian president of Beit Venezia – A Home for Jewish Culture, and he coordinated the Committee for the 500th anniversary of the Ghetto of Venice (1516-2016). His recent publications include Shakespeare in Venice. Exploring the City with Shylock and Othello (with Alberto Toso Fei, Elzeviro 2007, new ed. 2016) and Shakespeare’s Italy and Italy’s Shakespeare. Place, ‘Race’ and Politics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016).

For further information please visit: http://www.pearsinstitute.bbk.ac.uk/events/events-calendar/the-ghetto-of-venice-past-present-future/

THE ANGLO-ISRAEL ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY

THE ANNUAL RICHARD BARNETT MEMORIAL LECTURE

Dr Zuleika Rodgers: ‘Prof Jacob Weingreen of Trinity College: His Life, Scholarship and Near-Eastern Collection’.

6.00pm, THURSDAY 12th JANUARY 2017

Institute of Archaeology, Lecture Theatre G6, Ground Floor, University College London,

31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H OPY

Dr Rodgers will trace Jacob Weingreen’s career, covering his appointment as Professor of Hebrew at Trinity College Dublin in 1937, the development of his interest in Near Eastern archaeology and his founding of a museum of biblical antiquities at Trinity. His personal background will also be explored, including the Weingreen’s outstanding post-war work at the Displaced Persons Camp at Bergen-Belsen.

Zuleika Rodgers is assistant professor in Jewish Studies and Curator of the Weingreen Museum at Trinity College Dublin.

For further information: http://aias.org.uk/lectures-forthcoming/

 

 

UCL Institute of Jewish Studies, Public Lecture Series, Spring 2017

Thursday January 12th IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF ENGLAND
Colin Shindler (SOAS) ‘Anti-Semitism, anti-Zionism and the Left in Britain’
Reception from 6.30pm, foyer Lecture 7.00pm Gavin de Beer lecture theatre
UCL Anatomy Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (just south of UCL main entrance)

Thursday January 19th WITH THE INSTITUTE FOR POLISH-JEWISH STUDIES
Conference: ‘Writing Jewish History in Eastern Europe’
All day, Embassy of the Republic of Poland, London
Prior booking only: https://writingjewishhistory.eventbrite.co.uk

Wednesday February 8th BOOK LAUNCH
Carlotta Ferrara degli Uberti, (UCL), ‘Making Italian Jews – Family, Gender, Religion and the Nation, 1816-1918’
Reception from 6.30pm, foyer Lecture 7.00pm J.Z. Young lecture theatre
UCL Anatomy Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (just south of UCL main entrance)

Monday February 20th
Steven Fassberg (Hebrew University of Jerusalem Hebrew) ‘Trends and Methodologies in the Study of Qumran’
Reception from 6.30pm, Gavin de Beer room Lecture 7.00pm JZ Young lecture theatre
UCL Anatomy Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (just south of UCL main entrance)

Thursday February 23rd IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF ENGLAND

Geoffrey Cantor (University of Leeds) ‘The Jewish Chronicle and Punch’
Reception from 6.30pm, Gavin de Beer room Lecture 7.00pm JZ Young lecture theatre
UCL Anatomy Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (just south of UCL main entrance)

Thursday March 16th IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF ENGLAND
Tony Kushner (University of Southampton) ‘Jacob Harris: an early Jewish murderer in England’
Reception from 6.30pm, Gavin de Beer room Lecture 7.00pm JZ Young lecture theatre
UCL Anatomy Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (just south of UCLmain entrance)

Wednesday March 22nd IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE ANGLO-ISRAEL ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Mark Geller (UCL) ‘Is there such a thing as medicine in the Bible?’
Lecture 6.00pm J.Z. Young lecture theatre followed by a reception in the foyer
UCL Anatomy Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (just south of UCL main entrance)

Thursday April 20th IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF ENGLAND

Rachel Adelstein (University of Cambridge) ‘Women, Voice, and Music in British Synagogues’
Reception from 6.30pm, Gavin de Beer room Lecture 7.00pm JZ Young lecture theatre
UCL Anatomy Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (just south of UCLmain entrance)

PLEASE CHECK OUR WEBPAGE FOR CHANGES AND UPDATES
www.ucl.ac.uk/ijs

You can also join the mailing list for regular information.
email us on ijs@ucl.ac.uk or phone 020 7679 3520

Booking through Eventbrite is advised, see our website or mailshots for each event
There is no admission charge but voluntary contributions help us continue to keep our events free.

THE IJS IS A CHARITY SUPPORTED BY PEOPLE LIKE YOU
Charity Registration No.213114

The Astaire Seminar Series 2016/17 is organised between the Universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, St Andrews, Durham and Manchester. Events are free and open to all. If you are planning to attend any of these seminars please contact the local organiser for details regarding venue and timing. The address is in the link for each location.

15 December 2016, University of Glasgow
Venue:  Lecture Theatre A, Boyd Orr Building, University Avenue, Glasgow
Time: 5-7pm

Ada Rapoport Albert (UCL), From Russia to Poland: Interwar Habad Hasidism in Exile

Mia Spiro (University of Glasgow), The Dybbuk’s Haunted Stage: Performing Jewish Mysticism in the Aftermath of the Holocaust

This event is part of the Mysticism in Comparative Perspective Conference

21 March 2017, University of Manchester
Venue: A113 Samuel Alexander Building, University of Manchester
Time: 5-7pm

Sander Gilman (Emory University), Jews as Exiles and their Representations after 1933

Cathy Gelbin (University of Manchester), German Jews and the Cosmopolitan Ideal in Exile from National Socialism

26 April 2017, University of St Andrews
Venue: Old Class Library, School of History, 69 South Street, St Andrews
Time: 2-4pm

Adam Shear (University of Pittsburgh), Jews and their Books on the Move in Early Modern Europe

Emily Finer (University of St Andrews), Jewish Migration and Metamorphosis in Early Soviet Fiction

This event is co-sponsored by USTC and the School of History

9 May 2017, University of Durham
Elad Lapidot (Freie Universität Berlin), Deterritorialized Immigrant: The Talmudic Ger as a Cross-Border Figure

Ilan Baron (University of Durham), The International Cultural Politics of Israeli Cuisine

11 July 2017, University of Edinburgh
Hana Wirth-Nesher (University of Tel Aviv), To Move, to Translate, To Write: Jewish American Immigrant Voices

This event is a keynote lecture at the British Association for Jewish Studies Annual Conference.

Jewish History  Venue:

North American History Room, 2nd floor, IHR, North block, Senate House, Monday 17.15.

Convenors: Professor Michael Berkowitz (UCL), Dr Francois Guesnet (UCL), Professor David Feldman (Birkbeck), Dr Shirli Gilbert (Southampton), Dr Nathan Kurz (Birkbeck), Dr Andrea Schatz (KCL).

31 October,  Bryan Cheyette (University of Reading): “Against Supersessionism: Bringing together Jewish and other Histories”

28 November, Theodor Dunkelgrün (University of Cambridge): TBA

12 December, Philippa Hetherington (University College London): “Jewish Emigration, Territorial Excision and Libava as a ‘Special Migratory Zone’ in Late Imperial Russia”

For more information: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1YyF6eVqqV76EAYaE7hIIThW2kn0xeiMsFB5MYH2BIxk/edit

 

 

 

 

The Archive Thief: The Man Who Salvaged French Jewish History in the Wake of the Holocaust

Speaker: Professor Lisa Leff, American University

Date: Tuesday 8 November

Time:  6.30-8.00pm.

Venue: Room B34, Birkbeck University of London, Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 7HX.

Zosa Szajkowski, a Polish-born Jewish historian, took tens of thousands of Jewish documents from Europe in the 1940s and 50s and moved them, illicitly, to New York. He eventually sold them to Jewish research libraries, where they still remain today. Was this a heroic act of salvage or simply theft? To answer this question, Lisa Leff explores the shifting contours of Jewish nationalist ideas in the mid-twentieth century, and grapples with the vexing problem of where the material remnants of the Jewish past are best kept.

Lisa Moses Leff is Professor of History at American University in Washington, D.C. Her research focuses on Jews in nineteenth and twentieth century France.  She is author of Sacred Bonds of Solidarity: The Rise of Jewish Internationalism in 19th Century France(Stanford University Press, 2006) as well as the book upon which the present talk is based, The Archive Thief (Oxford University Press, 2015). The Archive Thief was a finalist for a National Jewish Book Award and the winner of the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature.

To book your place please click here.

‘Politics and Print in the Early Modern Period: Hebrew Books and the Christian Imagination’

Time, date and Venue: Tuesday, 18 October, 2016 at 6.15pm at Marsh’s Library, St Patrick’s Close, Dublin 8

This round table session brings together experts on Jews and Christians in the Early Modern Period to examine how the Christian world engaged with Hebrew books. Issues around the subjects of printers, censors and readers will be addressed.

Presenters:
Andrea Schatz, Reader in Jewish Studies, King’s College London:  ‘Translating Jewish History: The Early Modern Yosippon among Jews and Christians’.

Joanna Weinberg, Professor of Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford: ‘The Early Modern Jewish Library and its Christian Borrowers’.

Graeme Murdock, Associate Professor in European History, Trinity College Dublin: ‘Magyar Judah’: Developing a Language of Early Modern Protestant Culture’.

Piet van Boxel: Formerly Hebraica and Judaica Curator, Bodleian Library, University of Oxford: ‘The Roman Index Expurgatorius in 16th Century Italy: A Counterproductive Tool against Heretics and Jews’.

This event is hosted by Marsh’s Library in conjunction with the project on Manuscript, Book and Print Cultures, Trinity Long Room HUB. It is co-sponsored by the Herzog Centre (School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies), Trinity College Dublin.

For more information, please contact: Dr Zuleika Rodgers (rodgersz@tcd.ie).
For more information about the project on Manuscript, Book and Print Cultures, see: https://www.tcd.ie/trinitylongroomhub/themes/manuscript-book-print-cultures/

25 October 2016

‘Keeping the Memory of the Holocaust Alive: Possibilities and Limitations of Performative Practices of Commemoration’

Speaker: Diana Popescu, Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London

1.00 – 2.00pm, Dreyfus Room, 26 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DQ

Increasingly, museum curators and artists in various geographical contexts tell stories about the past using elements borrowed from theatre, digital media, religious ritual and performance art. In these diverse mise-en-scenes, members of the public take on not only the role of learners, but also of agents of commemoration – responsible for keeping the past in living memory, and for standing up to intolerance and injustice in their societies. This paper asks: what are the reasons for the rise in performative practices of commemoration? What might these practices inform us about the functions assigned to Holocaust remembrance in today’s societies? This paper will reflect critically on the impact which experiential forms of engaging with this history have upon contemporary audiences, and on the broader challenges of communicating about the Holocaust without it becoming a moral lesson, or a cultural commodity.

Free seminar for scholars. Limited places: book here

24 November 2016

‘Antisemitism and Antiziganism: Jews and Romanies in the Shadow of Genocide’

Speaker:Alexander Joskowicz, Vanderbilt University

1.00 – 2.00pm, Dreyfus Room, 26 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DQ

This talk traces the entanglement of Jewish and Romani (Gypsy) history in the twentieth and early twenty-first century, from the killing fields of Hitler’s Europe to the postwar creation of archives, debates over compensation, and contemporary Holocaust memorials. It seeks to understand how Jewish archives became central repositories of Romani narratives of suffering, how Jewish scholarship and the model of the Holocaust have shaped understandings of the Romani Holocaust, and how hostility to Jews and to Romanies relate to each other.

Free seminar for scholars. Limited places: book here

Announcement: Apply now for e-learning course: Bridging the Great Divide: the Jewish-Muslim Encounter

Never has there been a greater need for an understanding of other faiths and relations between faiths. No two world religions are closer in belief and practice than Judaism and Islam. In some instances, the similarities underpin shared advocacy and politics, as in Europe around protection of Halal and Kosher meat practices. Yet today, Jewish-Muslim interactions are often the source of intense religious conflict.

The Woolf Institute (Cambridge), in partnership with the School of International Service at the American University in Washington, is delighted to announce that the e-learning course, Bridging the Great Divide: the Jewish-Muslim Encounter, will be offered again in 2017.

Celebrating its 5th anniversary, this 15-week e-learning course will explore the history, culture and theology of Muslims and Jews, reflecting on similarities and differences as well as the major challenges. Assisted by leading experts and early career scholars in Europe and the USA, the course will also offer strategies for building bridges between the communities.

Because this course is committed to the highest levels of scholarly integrity, it will provide a space for the discussion of the entire range, in the broadest sense, of the Jewish-Muslim encounter. This discussion does not preclude more controversial issues.

Applications are now being accepted for the course commencing on Tuesday 17 January 2017. (The deadline for applications is 20 December 2016.)

The course fee for Woolf Institute students is £465. A limited number of bursaries are available.

For further details, visit http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/study/e-learning/mj.asp

GRADUATE SEMINAR 2016/17
Foster Court, Room 331 (HJS Seminar Room), Wednesdays 4-5 pm

Term 1
19.10.2016 Deborah Fisher
Exploring the Textual History of Targum Ecclesiastes

16.11.2016 Joseph Zitron
R. Isaiah Horowitz’s Shelah : A Comprehensive conception of Judaism?

30.11.2016 Yoni Birnbaum
Denominational Boundaries in the Halakhic Responsa of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein

14.12.2016 Vanessa Freedman (Subject Librarian Hebrew & Jewish Studies, UCL Library) Using electronic resources for research in Jewish Studies

Term 2
18.1.2017 Wojtek Rappak
Reporting a Genocide. Reflections on Page Ten, The New York Times, 25 November 1942

1.2.2017 Jonathan Ghariani
Bilateral and multilateral Middle East peace negotiations from 1991 to the present: A comparative analysis

22.2.2017 Jonathan Lewis
Jewish Chaplaincy in the British Armed Forces, 1892-1919

1.3.2017 Ben Whittle
The Translation of Hebrew Verbal Stems in the Pentateuch into Greek

PUBLIC Lecture Series AUTUMN 2016

Thursday October 20th (in conjunction with the Jewish Historical Society of England)

Daniel Langton (The University of Manchester): Wandering Jews in England’s Green and Pleasant Land’

Reception 6.30pm, Gavin de Beer room. Lecture 7pm, J.Z. Young lecture theatre.

UCL Anatomy Building, Gower Street WC1E 6BT

 

Wednesday November 9th   (raymond westbrook memorial lecture)

David Satran (Hebrew University of Jerusalem): Persuasion or Compulsion: approaches to the law in early Jewish and Christian traditio

Lecture 7.00pm, Roberts 106 followed by reception in the Roberts Building foyer

UCL, Torrington Pace, WC1E 7JE

 

Thursday November 17th  (in conjunction with the Jewish Historical Society of England)

Nicholas de Lange  (University of Oxford): ‘A New Approach to Mapping Jewish History’

Reception 6.30pm, Gavin de Beer room. Lecture 7pm, J.Z. Young lecture theatre.

UCL Anatomy Building, Gower Street WC1E 6BT

 

Wednesday November 30th

Ilana Tahan  (The British Library):Digitalizing Hebrew Manuscripts’

Lecture 7.00pm, UCL venue t.b.a

 

 

 

Monday December 5th   (in conjunction with Anglo-Israel Archaeological Society)

Ted Kaizer (Durham University): ‘“An Even More Unexpected Find” – the Synagogue of Dura-Europos and its Place in Local Society’

Lecture 6.00pm, Harrie Massey Lecture Theatre (E8), 25 Gordon Street, London WCIH OAY

Followed by refreshments, Leventis Gallery, Institute of Archaeology, 31-34 Gordon Square, WC1H 0PY

 

 

Thursday December 15th   (in conjunction with the Jewish Historical Society of England)

Stephen Massil (Jewish Historical Society of England): ‘Naphtali Franks FRS (1715-1796) – Musician, Synagogue Warden and Communal Eminence’

Reception 6.30pm, Gavin de Beer room. Lecture 7pm, J.Z. Young lecture theatre.

UCL Anatomy Building, Gower Street WC1E 6BT

 

Booking through Eventbrite is advised, see our website or mailshots before each event

There is no admission charge but voluntary contributions help us continue to keep our events free

please check our website for any changes and updates : www.ucl.ac.uk/ijs

 

email us on ijs@ucl.ac.uk or phone 020 7679 3520

 

The University of Nottingham
Department of Theology and Religious Studies

What can the Qurʾān, the Holy Scripture of Islam, teach us about Judaism and Christianity? How does knowledge about Judaism and Christianity help us to understand the Qurʾān better? This lecture series seeks to make academic research in Islamic Studies accessible to the broader public.
The speakers integrate literary and historical approaches in order to illustrate the intricate relationship between Jews, Christians, and Muslims. A better understanding of the past may in turn help us to reconsider the present in a more nuanced way, and to formulate answers to the challenges faced by the Muslim communities in the Western World and beyond. The talks will be followed by a response and a discussion. Attendance is free and open to the public, but registration is required (Register to attend Lecture 1).

Lecture 1

Saturday 17 September, 1-6pm,
Room A1, Highfield House, University Park
Welcome
Dr Holger Zellentin, The University of Nottingham
Asam Latif, Karimia Institute and The University of Nottingham
How to Study the Qurʾān – ‘Traditional’ and ‘Academic’ Approaches

Speakers
Prof Islam Dayeh, Free University, Berlin
Prof Mehdi Azaiez, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Response
Dr Marianna Klar, School of Oriental and African Studies
The Qurʾān and the Bible

Speakers
Prof Angelika Neuwirth, Free University, Berlin
Prof Gabriel Said Reynolds, Notre Dame University
Response
Dr Omar Ali-de-Unzaga, The Ismaili Institute

Website: https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/theology/news-events/quran-lectures-2016.aspx

 

 

The Long Room, Murray Edwards College, University of Cambridge

Co-organizers: Michal Bar-Asher Siegal (Ben Gurion University), Daniel Weiss (University of Cambridge), and Holger Zellentin (University of Nottingham)

Attendance is free and open to all members of the University and the public. You can RSVP, as well as view the programme and full conference description, via the following link:

http://www.divinity.cam.ac.uk/research/confseminars/conferences/talmud-christianity

‘The Other Within’ – The Hebrew and Jewish Collections of The John Rylands Library

Monday 27–Wednesday 29 June 2016 at The John Rylands Library150 Deansgate, Manchester, M3 3EH

Registration deadline approaching (Friday 17 June)

The second John Rylands Research Institute conference will convene scholars, curators and students researching areas represented in the John Rylands Library’s valuable and wide-ranging Hebrew and Jewish collections, including: the Cairo Genizah; medieval Hebrew manuscript codices; early printed Hebrew books; Samaritan manuscripts; and, the collections of Moses Gaster. The full programme is available for download on our website.

Key speakers include: Ben Outhwaite (University of Cambridge), Reinhard Pummer (University of Ottawa), Brad Sabin Hill (George Washington University Libraries) Emile Schrijver (University of Amsterdam), Sarit Shalev-Eyni (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), Ilana Tahan (British Library), Esther-Miriam Wagner (University of Cambridge and Woolf Institute). 

The public keynote lecture will be delivered at 6-7pm on Tuesday 28 June at the John Rylands Library by Sarit Shalev-Eyni (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) on, “New Light from Manchester on Hebrew Illuminated Manuscripts: The John Rylands Collection and its Significance”. The lecture is free to attend, and open to all. To find out more and book a place, visit our Eventbrite page.

Registration for the conference – limited places remaining

Delegates are invited to register for one of the last remaining places at the conference via our website. Deadline for registration is Friday 17 June.

Enquiries should be directed to: jrri.conference2016@manchester.ac.uk.

This event is supported by the European Association of Jewish Studies’ Conference Grant Programme in European Jewish Studies.

‘The Other Within’ – The Hebrew and Jewish Collections of The John Rylands Library

Monday 27–Wednesday 29 June 2016 at The John Rylands Library150 Deansgate, Manchester, M3 3EH

The second John Rylands Research Institute conference will convene scholars, curators and students researching areas represented in the John Rylands Library’s valuable and wide-ranging Hebrew and Jewish collections, including: the Cairo Genizah; medieval Hebrew manuscript codices; early printed Hebrew books; Samaritan manuscripts; and, the collections of Moses Gaster. The full programme is available for download on our website.

Key speakers include: Ben Outhwaite (University of Cambridge), Reinhard Pummer (University of Ottawa), Brad Sabin Hill (George Washington University Libraries) Emile Schrijver (University of Amsterdam), Ilana Tahan (British Library), Esther-Miriam Wagner (University of Cambridge and Woolf Institute). 

The public keynote lecture will be delivered at 6-7pm on Tuesday 28 June at the John Rylands Library by Sarit Shalev-Eyni (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) on, “New Light from Manchester on Hebrew Illuminated Manuscripts: The John Rylands Collection and its Significance”. The lecture is free to attend, and open to all. To find out more and book a place, visit our Eventbrite page.

Registration for the conference is now open!

Delegates are invited to register to attend the conference via our website. Places are very limited, and we would encourage delegates to attend as much for the conference as possible.

Enquiries should be directed to: jrri.conference2016@manchester.ac.uk.

This event is supported by the European Association of Jewish Studies’ Conference Grant Programme in European Jewish Studies.

EDITORS:

Dr hab. Prof. UP Sławomir Kapralski, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny w Krakowie and Professor Larry Ray, SSPSSR, University of Kent, UK

The politics of Holocaust memory in Poland has for many decades been an arena of dispute. The German occupation in Poland destroyed the largest pre-War Jewish population in the world and the Germans further placed six extermination camps in occupied Polish territory. While post-War Poland inevitably became a major site of Holocaust memory and commemoration this has always been entangled with contemporary Polish and international politics, both in the Communist and post-Communist periods. This Special Issue of the journal invites contributions on any aspect of disputed Holocaust memory in Poland. Topics might include (but are not limited to):

  • Communist era memory and commemoration of the Holocaust
  • The disputes about the Auschwitz Museum as a site of commemoration
  • Disputes in post-Communist commemoration, such as the Jedwabne controversy
  • Contemporary official historical politics in Poland and its impact on the representation of the Holocaust
  • Counter-memories and the construction of Polish history from abroad for example Israeli youth voyages to Poland
  • The dispute over Poles as rescuers vs Poles as betrayers
  • Beyond the generation of survivors? How is the politics of Holocaust memory transformed by the passing of the survivor generation?
  • Holocaust memory on the local level: local commemorations and practices of remembrance
  • The Holocaust in contemporary Polish cinema, theatre, fine arts, and popular culture
  • Contemporary initiatives in the field of Holocaust education
  • Polish encounters with the globalized Holocaust discourse

 

A typical article will contain 8,000–12,000 words including endnotes.

Please submit to the Special Issue editors an abstract of about 100 words by July 1st 2016

Each manuscript should have 3-6 keywords

For complete instructions on submitting a manuscript, please click here or visit the journal website http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rhos20#.VznO2Y-cHIU

Final date for submission June 30th 2017

If you have any queries or wish to discuss this Call, please contact the Special Issue Editors:

Larry Ray l.j.ray@kent.ac.uk

Sławomir Kapralski Kapral@up.krakow.pl

 

 

Please find attached the programme for the forthcoming conference taking place at the Clarendon Institute on 20-21 June.

All are welcome, but please pre-register  via this e-mail address and also kindly indicate whether you would like a sandwich lunch (for which there will be a £5 charge, payable on the day[s] you attend.)   sue.forteath@ochjs.ac.uk 

Conference Programme

Monday 20 June
SECOND TEMPLE PERIOD TO LATE ANTIQUITY

9.15am   Opening remarks:
Alison Salvesen and Sarah Pearce

9.30-10.15am   Hugh Williamson

Egypt in the Book of Isaiah

10.15-11am   Reinhard Kratz

Arameans and Judaeans: Ethnography and Identity at Elephantine

11-11.30am Coffee Break  

11.30-12.15pm  Noah Hacham

Between Jews and Non-Jews: the Case of 3 Maccabees

12.15-1pm   Livia Capponi

The metaphor of the plague. The expulsion of Jews in 19 CE and the image of Jews and Egyptians under Tiberius

1-2pm   Sandwich Lunch

2-2.45pm   Willy Clarysse

Identifying Jews: the evidence of the papyri

2.45-3.30pm   Margaret Williams
The Jews of Apollinopolis Magna/Edfu – a neglected

Diaspora community in early Roman imperial Egypt

3.30-4pm    Tea break

4-4.45pm   Gregory Sterling – Keynote

The history of the Alexandrian Jewish community

4.45-5.30pm   William Horbury – Keynote
Egypt in the Jewish Risings under Trajan

5.30-6pm Concluding remarks: Dorothy Thompson

7pm Dinner for speakers at Rewley House

Tuesday 21 June
THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD

9.15am     Introduction: Miriam Frenkel

9.30-10.15am    Esther-Miriam Wagner

Language and Identity in the Cairo Genizah

10.15-11am   Yehoshua Granat

An Andalusian in Alexandria: A new look at

Yehuda Halevi’s ‘Egyptian’ poems

11-11.30am- Coffee Break

11.30-12.15pm   Marzena Zawanowska

The concept of Egypt in medieval Karaite Bible exegesis

12.15-1pm  Paul Fenton

An Andalusi poet descends to Egypt: Judah al-Harîzî’s account of his visit to its communities in 1222

1-2pm    Sandwich Lunch

2-2.45pm   Joanna Weinberg

Living in Egypt–A Maimonidean Predicament

2.45-3.30pm  Judith Olszowy-Schlanger – Keynote

Hebrew scribes and script in medieval Egypt

3.30-4.15pm   Tea Break

JEWS IN EGYPT IN THE LATER PERIOD

4.15-5pm  Dotan Arad

‘In the wilderness of their enemies’: Jewish Attitudes
towards Muslim Space in light of a 15th-Century
Genizah Letter from Egypt

5-5.30pm  Ben Williams

From Exile in Egypt to Exile in Safed – Galut in Moses Alsheikh’s Commentary on the Song of Songs

5.30-6pm  Adriana X Jacobs

Esther Raab in Cairo 

6-6.30pm Epilogue: Mark Cohen

7pm Dinner for speakers at Rewley House

Date: Monday 27 June

Time: 10.30 am – 5.45 pm

Venue: Birkbeck University of London, Room 101, 30 Russell Square, WC1B 5DT

This workshop will explore how blood, in its regulation and its representation, has been interpreted and traded as a symbol between Jews and non-Jews, and in particular between Christians and Jews, through the centuries – from the biblical past to the present day.

The blood libel is a challenging subject in many ways. It raises the question of how we understand continuity (and discontinuity) in anti-Judaism. It also raises the problem of how we approach similar narratives that arise in widely different temporal and spatial contexts.

The workshop will address the following questions among others: how does blood libel change over time and between places? How should we approach blood libel methodologically? How were blood libels proven and disproven? Did this change over time and place? Why do blood libels cease to be propagated?

Speakers include: Susan Einbinder, University of Connecticut, Hillel Kieval, Washington University in St. Louis and Pawel Maciejko, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

To attend please register at: http://bloodlibels.eventbrite.co.uk

 

 

KEYNOTE  SPEAKER: DAME  HELENA KENNEDYwho is one of Britain’s most distinguished lawyers. She has spent her professional life giving voice to those who have least power within the system, championing civil liberties and promoting human rights. She has used many public platforms – including the House of Lords, to which she was elevated in 1997 – to argue with passion, wit and humanity for social justice. She has also written and broadcast on a wide range of issues, from medical negligence to terrorism to the rights of women and children.

Introductory address by Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg. Welcoming words from  Stephen Wordsworth Executive Director CARA.  CONCLUDING CONTRIBUTOR: Barbara Winton on the legacy of her late father, Sir Nicholas Winton

Confirmed Speakers:

Dr  Rachel Pistol (Royal Holloway) ‘ “Heavy is the responsibility for all the lives that might have been saved in the pre-war years”: British perceptions of refugees in the 1930s and 1940s’.   Dr Joanna Newman (King’s College, London) ‘Could Britain have done more? A case study of potential rescue: Gibraltar Camp Jamaica and the Bermuda Conference’. Dr Susan Cohen (Honorary Fellow, Parkes Institute) ‘In memory of Eleanor Rathbone, so-called ‘MP for Refugees’. Dr Peter Anderson (University of Leeds) ‘Eleanor Rathbone and Refugees from the Spanish Civil War 1936-1939’. Diana Packer (Northumbria University) ‘Refugee or Alien? The long term influence of Eastern Jewish immigrants on the reception of German Jews in the Thirties.’ Ms Lesley Urbach (Independent Researcher) ‘ Excuses, Excuses! Herbert Morrison and Britain’s Policy towards European Jews.‘ Dr Jennifer Craig-Norton (University of Southampton) ‘Misreading the Kindertransport as a ‘model’ refugee response in the 1930s and today’. Pierre Makhlouf (Assistant Director, Bail for Immigration Detainees) ‘Human rights of immigration detainees and deportees in a ‘hostile environment’. Cinead De Canntun (Kingston University, London) ‘Protecting people seeking asylum in the UK:  A legal and welfare needs approach to the asylum determination process’ .Mr Maurice Wren, Chief Executive Refugee Council ‘Refugees are welcome here! How public opinion got ahead of Government policy in the summer of 2015 and stayed there’

Ticket price £ 20.00 to include refreshments throughout the day and a vegetarian sandwich lunch To apply for a bursary please contact the organisers for  information:

Dr Susan Cohen  drsusancohen@gmail.com or   Ms Lesley Urbach lcurbach@aol.com.    EVENTBRITE  booking  Or http://bit.ly/1XX5193

Courtesy of The Institute of Contemporary British History and with the support of TheParkes Institute at the University of Southampton and B’Nai B’Rith, Leo Baeck (London) Trust Fund. Organised by the ‘Remembering Eleanor Rathbone Group’ in conjunction with The Institute of Contemporary British History  at King’s College London, The Wiener Library, Cara, the Refugee Council and JCORE                     www.rememberingeleanorrathbone.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

 

Venue: Birkbeck University of London, Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 7HX. Room B33, Torrington Square main entrance

Time: 6.30-8.00pm

Free event open to all:  Book your place

When trials against Jews for the “ritual murder” of Christians reappeared in Central Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century they seemed to be a throwback to the Middle Ages.  The truth is, however, that the modern trials were very different.  The “rules of the game” had changed: ritual murder accusations, and the criminal examinations that ensued, could no longer be framed in pre-Reformation language and symbols.  Prosecutors, magistrates, trial judges, and police investigators shared an implicit understanding that a new universe of knowledge was in place in which academic experts and practitioners of science defined the boundaries of plausible argument and were to be accorded deference.  This does not mean that traditional religious beliefs suddenly ceased to be disseminated or no longer influenced courtroom proceedings, but cultural traditions and psychological predispositions would no longer suffice. A new set of arguments and new appeals to authority were now needed to move states to indict or judges and juries to convict.

Hillel Kieval is Gloria M Goldstein Professor of Jewish History and Thought at Washington University in St Louis. His research focuses on transformations in Jewish culture and society in East Central Europe from the Enlightenment to the Second World War, including the effects of ethnic and national struggles, social conflict, and antisemitism on Jewish life and Jewish-Gentile relations. One area of particular interest is the function and phenomenology of the “ritual murder” trial in modern Europe.

 

The Woolf Institute (Cambridge) is delighted to announce that applications are now being accepted for the e-learning course, Jews, Christians and Muslims in Europe: Modern Challenges

This timely e-learning course focuses on the relationships between Jews, Christians and Muslims in modern Europe. The course is multidisciplinary and examines historical trends, religious and cultural interaction, and issues of contemporary citizenship.

The course will be led and co-taught by Dr Gorazd Andrejč , Dr Sami Everett, and  Dr Esther-Miriam Wagner. For more information on the topics covered, the structure of the course, and the application details, please see here.

The e-learning approach allows participants to study wherever and whenever they choose via the internet. Many participants from across Europe and around the world – Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Poland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, as well as Australia, China, Kenya, Indonesia, Japan, New Zealand, and the United States – have already taken this course. 

To get a feel for the course from the students’ perspective, please find reflections on the course by two former students who completed the course here and here.

The closing date for applications is 2 August 2016. The course commences, with Induction Week, on Monday 5 September 2016. The application form is available to download here. The course fee is £350. A limited number of bursaries are available.

If you have any queries about the course, contact Dr Emma Harris, Academic Coordinator, at eth22@cam.ac.uk.

Jews, Christians and Muslims in Europe Modern Challenges 2016.jpg

Sunday 7th to Friday 12th August 2016 
Ot Azoy: our Yiddish course has expanded to be held at 5 levels, we have the addition of Yuri Vedenyapin from Harvard joining our Yiddish faculty this year to add to a compliment of some of the world’s best Yiddish teachers.
More details and to book here: https://www.jmi.org.uk/event/ot-azoy-2016/

Sunday 7th to Friday 12th August 2016 
Golden Peacock: our Yiddish Song Course is back again this August with Shura Lipovsky, Lorin Sklamberg, Karsten Troyke, Rachel Weston and with the addition of Joseph Finlay as accompanist. Immerse yourself in 6 days of Yiddish song, learning repertoire, singing in the choir, learning new insights and performing to the fellow students and the public.
More details and to book here: https://www.jmi.org.uk/event/golden-peacock-2016 

Monday 15th to Friday 19th August
Klezfest 2016: After a very successful relaunch of Klezfest last summer, this summer we are back with even more faculty. The faculty is led by Ilana Cravitz (London Klezmer Quartet) who will be joined by Alan Bern (Yiddish Summer Weimar and Brave Old World), Frank London (Klezmatics), Merlin Shepherd (Sklamberg and the Shepherds) as well as a stellar line up of some of the best UK Klezmoriim in the UK, Susi Evans, Guy Schalom, Francesca Ter-Berg with more to be announced.
More details and to book here: https://www.jmi.org.uk/event/klezfest-2016 

JR Ot Azoy Golden Peacock AD 2016.jpg

The Cambridge Faculty of Divinity is pleased to announce that the 2016 Yerushah Lecture will take place at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 5 May, in the Runcie Room, Faculty of Divinity, West Road.  Nicholas de Lange, Emeritus Professor of Hebrew and Jewish Studies and acclaimed translator of modern Hebrew literature, will speak on ‘The poetry of Judaism:  Translating a precious heritage.’ All are welcome, and refreshments will be served following the lecture.

The annual Yerushah Lecture in the Faculty of Divinity was established with a benefaction from the Righteous Persons Foundation, created by Steven Spielberg from the proceeds of his 1993 film Schindler’s List. ‘Yerushah’ is the Hebrew word for ‘heritage’. The Yerushah Lecture is devoted to Jewish heritage in all its aspects, with an emphasis on the transmission of Jewish identity and values across the generations.   

Weblinks:

http://www.divinity.cam.ac.uk/events/yerushah-lecture-2016

http://www.divinity.cam.ac.uk/research/confseminars/named-lectures/yerushah-lecture

AN ALL-DAY CONFERENCE TO BE HELD ON WORLD REFUGEE DAY Monday 20 JUNE 2016 at King’s College, London. Strand Campus. 9.00 am– 5.00 pm

BOOKING NOW OPEN

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: BARONESS HELENA KENNEDY QC. Helena Kennedy is a leading barrister and an expert in human rights law, civil liberties and constitutional issues. She is a member of the House of Lords and chair of Justice – the British arm of the International Commission of Jurists.

THE MORNING SESSION WILL BE DEVOTED TO PAPERS WITH AN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE,  THE AFTERNOON SESSION TO PAPERS EXAMINING CONTEMPORARY ISSUES

Confirmed Speakers: Dr Rachel Pistol (Royal Holloway), Dr Jennifer Craig-Norton (University of Southampton) Mr Maurice Wren, (Chief Executive Refugee Council), Dr Joanna Newman (King’s College, London), Dr Susan Cohen (Honorary Fellow, Parkes Institute), Dr Peter Anderson (University of Leeds), Diana Packer (Northumbria University), Lesley Urbach (Independent Researcher) Pierre Makhlouf

(Assistant Director, Bail for Immigration Detainees) Cinead Decanntun (Kingston University, London).

TICKETS:  £ 20.00  to include all refreshments and a sandwich lunch.

PLEASE BOOK THROUGH  EVENTBRITE

Organisers: Dr Susan Cohen drsusancohen@gmail.com; Ms Lesley Urbach lcurbach@aol.com

www.rememberingeleanorrathbone.wordpress.com

Courtesy of The Institute of Contemporary British History and with the support of The Parkes Institute at the University of Southampton and B’Nai B’rith, Leo Baeck London Trust

organised by the ‘Remembering Eleanor Rathbone Group’ in conjunction with The Council for Assisting at-risk Academics, The Institute of Contemporary British History at King’s College, London, The Jewish Council for Racial Equality, The Refugee Council, Refugee Week, The Wiener Library, London

Speakers:      Professor Todd M. Endelman, University of Michigan
Date:               Tuesday 24 May 2016
Time:               6.30-8.30pm 

Venue:            

Birkbeck University of London, Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 7HX. Room B35, Torrington Square main entrance

Free event open to all:  Book your place

Historians of antisemitism tend to focus on political parties and ideologies; on extra-parliamentary associations and movements; on legal and bureaucratic obstacles to Jewish mobility; and on the representation of Jews in literature and public forums.  Rarely do they ask how Jews – especially “ordinary” Jews – experience the stigmatization of Jewishness.  In this lecture Todd Endelman explores how the persistence of hostility to Jews in social and cultural life, even in liberal states, influenced the emotional life and self-understanding of Jews in Western and Central Europe and the United States, and how this, in turn, contributed to indifference to Judaism and alienation from Jewish communal attachments. 

Todd Endelman is Professor Emeritus of History and Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan. His books include: Leaving the Jewish Fold: Conversion and Radical Assimilation in Modern Jewish History (Princeton University Press, 2015), Broadening Jewish History (The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization, 2011) and The Jews of Britain 1656-2000 (University of California Press, 2000).

Conference Programme

(for further information please see: http://www.medici.org/the-birth-and-evolution-of-the-venetian-ghetto/)

Thursday, 5 May 2016

13:00   Registration Opens

Welcome                                        

14:00   Representative of the Office of the Mayor of Venice
14:10    Emanuela Carpani (Soprintendenza belle arti e paesaggio per Venezia e laguna)
14:20   Paolo Gnignati (Comunità Ebraica, Venezia)
14:30    Giuseppe Veltri (Maimonides Centre for Advanced Studies, Hamburg)

Introduction

14:40    Alessio Assonitis (The Medici Archive Project, Florence)

Introductory Lecture

14:55    Piergabriele Mancuso (The Eugene Grant Research Program on Jewish History and Culture in Early Modern Europe —The Medici Archive Project) – The Ghetto of Venice and the Making of Early Modern Jewry.

Panel One: The Ghetto in its Historical Dimension                                 

Chair: Simon Levis Sullam (Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia)
15:40   Giacomo Corazzol (Tel Aviv University) – The Prehistory of the Venetian Ghetto in the Eyes of a Cretan Jew: Venice, 1509
16:05
   Piercesare Ioly Zorattini (Università degli Studi di Udine) – Il Ghetto e il S. Uffizio di Venezia: una storia di lunga durata (secc. XVI-XVIII)
16:30
   Zrinka Podhraški Čizmek and Naida Mihal Brandl (University of Split/University of Zagreb) – Mercanti ebrei fra le due sponde dell’Adriatico nel XVIII secolo

16:55   Coffee Break

17:25   Stefania Silvestri (The John Rylands Library – University of Manchester) – Jewish Women from Venice: A Portrayal through the Study of their Ketubbot
17:50
   Alessandro Guetta (Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales, Paris) – Italian Citizens of Jewish Faith: The Italian texts of David de Pomi and Leone Modena
18:15
    Panel One Closes

18:30   Day One Closes

  Friday, 6 May 2016

Panel Two: The Architectures of the Venetian Ghetto                            

Chair: Donatella Calabi (Università Iuav di Venezia)
9:00    Elisa Bastianello (Independent Scholar) – Il Ghetto: aperture urbane e sociali
9:25
    Gianmario Guidarelli (Università degli Studi di Padova) – Le sinagoghe del Ghetto di Venezia nel contesto della architettura del Rinascimento veneziano
9:50
    Alessandra Ferrighi (Università Iuav di Venezia) – Dopo il Ghetto. La nuova contrada Riunione e le trasformazioni nella prima metà dell’Ottocento
10:15
    Stefano Zaggia (Università degli Studi di Padova) – Dalle contrade ebraiche ai ghetti nelle città della Repubblica di Venezia (secc. XV-XVI)
10:40
   Panel Two Closes

10:45   Coffee Break

Panel Three: The Venetian Ghetto and its Philosophical Legacy         

Chair: Giuseppe Veltri (Director, Maimonides Centre for Advanced Studies, Hamburg)
11:15     Abraham Melamed (University of Haifa) – When did Judaism Become a Religion? The Case of Simone Luzzatto
11:40
    Anna Lissa (Maimonides Centre for Advanced Studies) – Scepticism and Politics in Simone Luzzatto’s Works
12:05
   Evelien Chayes (CNRS – IRHT, Paris) – Christians Studying in the Venetian Ghetto: Talmud and Scepticism 1630-1640
12:30
   Michela Torbidoni (Maimonides Centre for Advanced Studies) – L’esercizio serio-giocoso del rabbino Simone Luzzatto: un dibattito scettico sull’anima

12:55   Panel Three Closes

13:00   Lunch Break

Panel Four: Arts and Theatre in the Venetian Ghetto                             

Chair: Shaul Bassi (Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia)
14:45    Rafael D. Arnold (Universität Rostock) – Contrasting Sepulchral Traditions in Venice (Ashkenazic and Sephardic)
15:10
    Erith Jaffe-Berg (University of California, Riverside) – The Ghetto and Performance Making in Venice and Mantua in the Early Modern Period
15:35
   Michele Osherow (University of Maryland, Baltimore County) – The Problem of Conversion in Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice
16:00
  Elizabeth Rich (Independent Scholar) – Moisè da Castellazzo, the Consiglio dei Dieci and Copyright Privileges: How a Jewish artist protected his creation of a picture-Bible in 1521

16:30   Panel Four Closes

16:35   Closing Remarks & Final Discussion

17:00   Drinks Reception                                                                                                           

18:00  End of Conference

Download Conference Program Here.

Please note, registration is required please write to conference@medici.org

Astaire lecture 2016 poster.jpg

PUBLIC LECTURE 

Circumcision: An Index of Difference and/or the Health Exception

Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London

Speaker: Professor Sander Gilman, Institute of the Liberal Arts, Emory University

Date:                   8 March 2016

Time:                   6.30-8.00pm

Venue: Birkbeck University of London, Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 7HX. Room B34, Torrington Square main entrance

Free event open to all:  Book your place

Ritual practice defines religion, not least the ancient practice of infant male circumcision undertaken by Jews and others.

Among western societies, the United States is the nation in which infant male circumcision is most widely accepted and practiced. Here 55 per cent of infant male children have their foreskins surgically removed before leaving hospital, but for “health” rather than for “religious” reasons.  In Europe, by contrast, only 10 per cent of boys are circumcised.

In this lecture Professor Gilman asks what happens when religion and medicine compete or are allied; what happens when these two aspects of the public sphere overlap? In what contexts does circumcision occur as a health practice or as a risk?  What are the implications of health-related circumcision for religious practice?

Sander L. Gilman is Professor of the Liberal Arts and Sciences as well as Professor of Psychiatry at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. A distinguished cultural and literary historian, he is the author or editor of over eighty books, most recently, Illness and Image: Case Studies in the Medical Humanities (Transaction Publishers, 2015); and the edited volume, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam:  Collaboration and Conflict in the Age of Diaspora (Hong Kong University Press, 2014)

This lecture is one of a series taking themes from the Blood exhibition held at the Jewish Museum London (5 November 2015 – 28 February 2016), which was conceived in collaboration with the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism.

_________________________________________ 

Last of the Unjust
Film screening and discussion

Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London

Speakers:                 David Feldman, Director, Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London; Jacqueline Rose, Professor for Humanities, Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London 

Date:                   Sunday 13 March 2016

Time:                   2.00-7.00pm

Venue: Birkbeck University of London, Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 7HX. Room B36, Torrington Square main entrance

Free event open to all:  Book your place

It took Claude Lanzmann forty years to complete this film of his 1975 dialogues with Benjamin Murmelstein, former leading rabbi of Vienna, one of three Jewish elders, and the only one to survive, who worked under Nazi orders at Theresienstadt during World War II.

Originally the first footage Lanzmann filmed for his epochal Shoah, the dialogues were not included in that film. Like Shoah, The Last of the Unjust raises the most searching ethical and political questions: in this case, about Murmelstein’s role in the Holocaust, the subsequent accusations of his treachery and his exile, and about Lanzmann’s role as film-maker in the reading and preserving of this history.

The complexity of Lanzmann’s role, and the place of his films in contemporary discussions about legacy and continuity in relation to Jewish history, will be the focus of the discussion following the film’s screening, led by Professor Jacqueline Rose and Professor David Feldman.

You are welcome to join us for the whole event or just the discussion, which will begin at 6.00pm.

 

The School of History, Archaeology and Religion of Cardiff University is pleased to invite you to a Special Lecture in Ancient History on Tuesday 1st March 2016, at 5pm to be delivered by Professor Irad Malkin (Tel-Aviv and Oxford).

Title: The ‘Small Greek World’ and the world of the Archaic Mediterranean

Venue: Council Chamber Room 1.77, Main Building, Cardiff University

Prof. Irad Malkin is an ancient historian, expert in ancient Greek colonisation, network theory, ethnicity and religion. He is the recipient of the 2014 Israel Prize in the field of General History.

There will be a brief opening address by the Head of School, Professor Chris Williams, and the talk will be followed by wine reception and dinner.

If you wish to attend, please email the organiser, Dr. Maria Fragoulaki, as available places are limited (FragoulakiM@cardiff.ac.uk). Please also indicate if you wish to join the dinner at a local restaurant.

ALL are welcome! 

For further information and application please see http://katz.sas.upenn.edu/shaking-foundations.

Shaking Foundations flyer.jpg

Pears Institute Lunchtime Seminar

The Bolshevik Response to Antisemitism in the Russian Revolution

Speaker: Dr Brendan McGeever, Pears Institute Research Fellow, Birkbeck, University of London

Date: 2 February 2016

Time: 1.00-2.00pm

Venue:  Dreyfus Room, 26 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DQ

Free seminar for scholars. Limited places: book here

The Russian Revolution of 1917 was the high point of class struggle in the twentieth century. In the very moment of revolution, however, the Bolsheviks were forced to confront mass outbreaks of antisemitic violence as pogroms raged across the Western and South-Western borderlands. The pogroms posed fundamental questions for Marxist theory and practice, particularly since they revealed the nature and extent of working-class and peasant attachments to antisemitic representations of Jewishness.

Based on extensive fieldwork in Russian and Ukrainian archives, this paper has two aims: first, it offers a broad analysis of the nature of the articulation between antisemitism and the revolutionary process, focusing in particular on the phenomenon of Red Army pogroms; and second, it offers an analysis of Bolshevik attempts to arrest these articulations. The paper argues that the key agent in the Soviet response to antisemitism was not the Bolshevik party leadership, as is often assumed, but a small grouping of non-Bolshevik Jewish socialists who coalesced around the peripheral apparatuses of the Soviet state.

Pears Institute lunchtime seminars provide an opportunity to hear and discuss new work in progress from an invited speaker in an informal setting. We cannot provide lunch but you are welcome to bring your own.

_________________________________________________

Ida
Film screening and discussion

Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London

Speakers:                 Dr François Guesnet, University College London and Dr Małgorzata Pakier, POLIN, Museum of the History of Polish Jews, Warsaw

 Date:                    Sunday 7 February 2016

Time:                   3.00-5.45pm

Venue: Birkbeck University of London, Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 7HX. Room B36, Torrington Square main entrance

Free event open to all:  Book your place

This award-winning film is a moving and intimate drama about a young novice nun in 1960s Poland who, on the verge of taking her vows, discovers from her only living relative that she is Jewish. So begins a quest to discover who she really is and where she belongs. The intersection of Ida’s personal story and momentous historic events makes this a powerful and affecting film which explores the place of the Holocaust, memory and forgetting in postwar communist Poland.

The film will be followed by a round-table discussion between Dr François Guesnet, University College London and Dr Małgorzata Pakier, POLIN, Museum of the History of Polish Jews, Warsaw

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Pears Institute Lunchtime Seminar

A Second Emancipation? “Philosemitism” and the Jewish Condition in Postwar  Europe

Speaker: Professor Daniel Cohen, Rice University, Texas

Date: 1 March 2016

Time: 1.00-2.00pm

Venue:  Dreyfus Room, 26 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DQ

Free seminar for scholars. Limited places: book here

What is “philosemitism” and what role did it play in Western Europe from the end of World War Two to 1989, and in the European Union since its inception?

“Philosemitism” is a concept fraught with ambiguities and often dangerously close to antisemitic discourse. Yet new theological, political and cultural attitudes towards Jewishness in the aftermath of the Holocaust have marked a radical departure from the pre-war past. Understood in this way, “philosemitism” is a central feature of postwar European history. Despite the persistence and recent intensification of antisemitism, Jewishness moved closer to the mainstream of European life. The “Jewish Century”, to follow Yuri Slezkin’s apt formulation, is not merely a triangular story of Zionist, Soviet Communist or American trajectories: postwar Europe is a no less important site of Jewish normalization.

Pears Institute lunchtime seminars provide an opportunity to hear and discuss new work in progress from an invited speaker in an informal setting. We cannot provide lunch but you are welcome to bring your own.

Thursday January  21st – Evening lecture IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF ENGLAND

Piet van Boxel – The Popes and the Jews in 16th Italy:  a convoluted encounter

Drinks served from 6.30pm followed by Lecture at 7.00pm   Venue: G46 (HO Schild Pharmacology lecture theatre), Medical Sciences building, UCLEntrance via Malet Place, off Torrington Place

Thursday February 4th  – Lecture at 5.30pm

Simon Muir – Brothers-in-arms with Nazi Germans: Jews in Finland during World War II

Venue: Chadwick G08, Chadwick Building, UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT

Wednesday March 2nd – Simon Wiesenthal Memorial Lecture at 6.30pm

Rainer Kampling – The future of the past: Reflecting on Jewish history under the signs of shadow and hope

Venue: J.Z. Young lecture theatre, UCL Anatomy Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (just south of the main entrance)

Wednesday March 9th – Lecture in conjunction with UCL Institute of the Americas  at 6pm

Nathan Wachtel – The ‘Jewish Indian Theory’: The Problem of the Origin of the American Populations

Venue: Gustave Tuck lecture theatre. Followed by a reception in the South Cloisters

Thursday March 17th – Richard Barnett Memorial Lecture in conjunction with the Jewish Historical Society of England time t.b.a.

David Abulafia – The first Sephardim in the Atlantic

Venue: Gavin de Beer room, UCL Anatomy Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (just south of the main entrance)

And coming in the last week of July (dates to be confirmed) – The IJS summer conference

Jewish Languages

PROGRAMME DETAILS MAY CHANGE. See our website www.ucl.ac.uk/ijs  for updates

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE TO PRESENT UNPRECEDENTED TRIBUTE TO THE JERUSALEM SAM SPIEGEL FILM SCHOOL:

8-WEEK HOMAGE TO 8 OUTSTANDING GRADUATES 21/1/2016-10/3/2016

Møller Center Auditorium, Churchill College, Storey’s way, CB3 0DE

listing.jpgThe University of Cambridge will present an unprecedented tribute for the Jerusalem Sam Spiegel Film School to mark the 25th anniversary of the school’s establishment.

Under the title “Between Escapism and Strife,” the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies will host an eight-session tribute. Beginning January 21, 2016 and each successive Thursday for eight weeks, one of eight outstanding graduates of the school will screen their films, and discuss the social, political and cinematic contexts of the works.

The opening event of the Tribute will be held in the presence of the Jerusalem Sam Spiegel School founding director Renen Schorr, together with graduate Tamar Kay, the newly-announced winner of the IDFA Festival for her documentary film The Mute’s House.

“Each year, we invite a number of Israeli artists to Cambridge who are influential in various realms of art,” stated Dr. Yaron Peleg of Cambridge, who initiated the tribute together with Dr. Tali Artman-Partock. “This year marks the first time in the annals of the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Faculty that we have invited a group of eight varied, diverse Israelis who express the “quality mass” that has emerged from the Jerusalem Sam Spiegel Film School, an institution whose singular method brought about the renaissance of Israeli cinema in Israel and the world. We are keenly interested in the means by which the unique voice of each of these graduates has developed in relationship to the political, social and cultural arenas. The Tribute sessions are free of charge, and we expect an open dialogue with an audience arriving not only from Cambridge but also from London and throughout England at large.”

listing1.jpgThe Jerusalem Sam Spiegel Film School boasts over 700 graduates. The eight that have been selected for the Cambridge Tribute represent filmmakers from the first through the last graduating class. They include David Ofek (Bat Yam – New York, Minimum Wage), Dr. Dan Geva (Footsteps in Jerusalem – tribute to David Perlov), Talya Lavie (Zero Motivation), Nadav Lapid (The Kindergarten Teacher), Elad Keidan (Afterthought), Yaelle Kayam (Mountain), Yehonatan Indursky (Shtisel), and Tamar Kay (The Mute’s House).

“We are very excited about the upcoming Cambridge event,” noted Renen Schorr, director of the Jerusalem Sam Spiegel School. “To date, over 190 retrospectives have been mounted throughout the world in tribute to our school, including at the MoMA and the Berlin Festival. But this latest tribute is particularly moving since it is taking place within the elite academia with much broader ramifications, outside of the “cinema bubble,” where the 700-year-old Cambridge “court” is paying tribute to the 25-year-old “court” of Jerusalem.”

The Cambridge Tribute is being held through the assistance of University of Cambridge, the Lord Alex Bernstein Estate, Sharon Harel, the Jerusalem Foundation, the Israel Film Fund, and the UK Jewish Festival.

For further details, contact:  Dr. Tali Artman-Partock, Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, ta378@cam.ac.uk; 01223 335333. 

The full programme booklet can be found here: University of Cambridge Tribute to Jerusalem Sam Spiegel Film School (21.1.16-10.3.16) – Booklet

Antisemitism, ‘Volksgemeinschaft’ and Violence: Inclusion and Exclusion in Nazi Germany

Holocaust Memorial Day Lecture – Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London in collaboration with the Institute of Historical Research

Speaker:     Professor Michael Wildt, Humboldt University, Berlin
Date:            27 January 2016
Time:           6.30-8.00pm
Venue:
Wolfson Suite, Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU
Free event open to all: Book your place

Michael Wildt is professor of Modern German History at Humboldt University, Berlin and renowned scholar on Nazi Germany. He is the author of Hitler’s Volksgemeinschaft and the Dynamics of Racial Exclusion: Violence Against Jews in Provincial Germany (Berghan, 2012).

 

Anthropology, Race Theory and the Jewish Connection

Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London

Speakers:    Professor Dan Stone, Royal Holloway, University of London
Date:             9 February 2016
Time:            6.30-8.00pm
Venue:
Birkbeck University of London, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HX. Room B35, Torrington Square main entrance
Free event open to all: Book your place

In the nineteenth century, anthropologists, eager to discover the origins of and demarcations between different “races”, regularly looked to the Jews – believed to be a pure and long-existing race – to test their theories. Taking these early anthropological ideas we can see how modern race theory was constructed. This lecture will deal with notions of racial purity, racial origins and the desire of pioneer anthropologists to “sort out” different racial groups. Professor Stone will conclude by connecting the discussion with today’s attempts to discover “Jewish genes” and to develop ethnically-directed medicine.

Dan Stone is Professor of Modern History at Royal Holloway, University of London. His research interests include: the history of anthropology, the history of and interpretation of the Holocaust and comparative genocide. His most recent publications include: Goodbye to All That? The Story of Europe since 1945 (Oxford University Press, 2014) and The Liberation of the Camps: The End of the Holocaust and its Aftermath (Yale University Press, 2015).

 

Prof. Michael Marrus, ‘Lessons of the Holocaust’
Mon 15 and Tue 16 February 2016

We are delighted to announce that the second series of Bogdanow Lectures in Holocaust Studies will be given by Michael Marrus (Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor Emeritus of Holocaust Studies, University of Toronto). His new book Lessons of the Holocaust is due out Jan 2016. Among his previous publications are Vichy France and the Jews (1981), with Robert O. Paxton, The Unwanted: European Refugees in the Twentieth Century (1985), The Holocaust in History (1987) and The Nuremberg War Crimes Trial 1945-46: A Documentary History (1997).

Venue: Samuel Alexander Building (Building 67 on the Campus Map, seedirections). The event is open to the public; there is no need to book a place.

Abstract: These two lectures will examine the “lessons” that Jews and non-Jews are expected to draw from the catastrophe of modern Jewry in the twentieth century – what we have come to call the Holocaust. The issue of “lessons” is much more problematic than appears to the public at large.  Contested territory even during the events themselves, claims about such lessons link with debates about Jewish collective memory, human rights, historical understanding, and the quest for justice. In these lectures, Michael Marrus will explore this issue, drawing on his new book The Lessons of the Holocaust(University of Toronto Press). Marrus challenges the popular expectation that Holocaust history can teach us formulaic lessons, examining difficult questions this field poses for those who claim to draw upon the past for direction in the present.

Mon 15 Feb. 5.15pm. Lecture 1. My Problem with Lessons A101 Samuel Alexander Building

Mon 15 Feb. 7.00pm. Kosher buffet. North Foyer, Samuel Alexander Building

Tue 16 Feb. 5.15pm. Lecture 2. Why I Prefer History A101 Samuel Alexander Building

Together with Eugenio F. Biagini (Professor of Modern and Contemporary History, Cambridge), the Woolf Institute is organising a conference to commemorate the 360th anniversary of Oliver Cromwell’s readmission of Jews to Britain and Ireland in 1656. Themes will include the origins of toleration and the long-term and wider significance of the return for the UK today.

Speakers will include David Abulafia (Professor of Mediterranean History, Cambridge), John Coffey (Professor of Early Modern History, Leicester), Rabbi Joseph Dweck (Senior Rabbi of the Spanish and Portuguese Jews’ Congregation of London), David Feldman (Director of the Pears Institute and Professor of History, Birkbeck) and John Morrill (Professor of British and Irish History, Cambridge).

The conference will take place at Sidney Sussex College(Oliver Cromwell’s College) on Monday 11th January 2016.

The programme can be downloaded here.

A flyer is available here.

Registration is handled by Sidney Sussex College. The registration form is online here.

For further information, please contact Claire Curran atcc640@cam.ac.uk.

15 DEC 2015, 17.00.  OLD MINING BLDG 2.01

New developments in DNA technology are having a huge impact on medical genetics, forensic identification, and exciting areas of research, including ancient DNA studies. But the technology is also aiding a growing industry in genetic genealogies, where human identity is defined in terms of DNA variants, rather than customs, language, family and home. It is no surprise that some genetics projects, like that of the Jewish genome, have become deeply controversial. It is proving hard to strike a balance between recognising the usefulness and excitement of the new genetics research, and resisting a return to crude categories of human racial differences.

Free, no tickets. Info: finrad@leeds.ac.uk

Brodetsky 2015.jpg

On Sunday, November 22, 2015, the Center for Research in the Arts,

Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH), in collaboration with St John’s

College Cambridge and the Jewish Historical Society of England shall be

hosting the international conference:

Solomon Schechter’s Life and Legacy: A Jewish Scholar in Victorian

England (1882–1901).

It is the second of a pair of conferences, organised in cooperation with

the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University

of Pennsylvania on the occasion of the centenary of Schechter’s death

(see http://schechterlegacy.com/). The American conference, held last

Spring at the National Museum of American Jewish History, was devoted to

aspects of Schechter’s life and work in the United States. The Cambridge

conference will focus on Schechter’s life in England, and especially on

his work as a scholar. Attendance is free of charge, but space is

limited and those willing to attend are requested to register in

advance. The conference programme and further details may be found here:

http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/26067

Jews and the Left in Britain Today

Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London

Speakers: Alan Johnson, Britain Israel Communications & Research Centre; Lesley Klaff, Sheffield Hallam University and UK Lawyers for Israel; David Rosenberg, educator, author and Jewish Socialist Group; Nadia Valman, Queen Mary, University of London and Independent Jewish Voices
Date: 3 November 2015
Time: 6.30-8.00pm

Venue: Birkbeck University of London, Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 7HX. Room B33, Torrington Square main entrance

Free event open to all: Book your place

The relationship between Jews and the British left has long been a source of controversy and, sometimes, acrimony. Support for the Palestinians and criticism (some argue the ‘demonization’) of Israel has provided one set of recurrent contentious issues. There has also been division over whether some parts of the left are prepared to tolerate rather than condemn antisemitism and, conversely, whether Jews engage sufficiently with campaigns against other racisms. Most recently, Jeremy Corbyn’s successful campaign to become leader of the Labour Party, and opposition to that campaign, appears to have driven relations between British Jews and the Labour Party to a new low point.

The aim of the panel will be to ask to what extent relations between Jews and the left have turned sour.  In so far as they have, why has this happened? Does negative commentary in the Jewish press and elsewhere reflect or inflame opinion? Finally, the panel will ask what it is that Jews and people on the left should do now?
Blood – Uniting and Dividing

A cutting-edge exhibition at the Jewish Museum London, developed in collaboration with the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism.
Date: 5 November 2015 – 28 February 2016
Time: All day

Venue: Jewish Museum London, Raymond Burton House, 129-131 Albert Street, London, NW1 7NB

Ticket required:     Visit the Jewish Museum London’s website for details

Drawing together religious, historical and medical artefacts, as well as literature, art, film and cultural ephemera, this exhibition explores how blood, in its regulation and its representation, has been interpreted and traded as a symbol between Jews and non-Jews through the centuries, with a particular focus on the real and symbolic links between Christians and Jews.

The exhibition confronts some of the most difficult issues surrounding Jewish culture and identity: the rite of circumcision, the slander of the blood libel, and ideas of the Jewish ‘race’ and of racial purity.

Anthony Bale, Professor of Medieval Studies at Birkbeck and David Feldman, Director of the Pears Institute have acted as academic advisors for the exhibition and as editors for an accompanying publication,  Blood – Reflections on What Unites and Divides Us, a collection of specially commissioned essays from leading  international scholars which expand on the exhibition’s themes.

This illustrated publication is available on-line from the Pears Institute. Full details and order your copy

Blood Fractions: the Octoroon and Other Fantasies

Speaker: Professor Roger Luckhurst, Birkbeck, University of London
Date: 26 November 2015
Time: 6.30-8.00pm

Venue: Jewish Museum London, Raymond Burton House, 129-131 Albert Street, London NW1 7NB

Talk free with museum entry: To book your place email: admin@jewishmuseum.org.uk

In the eyes of the Victorians, the octoroon – a person with one-eighth black blood – was a focus of anxiety about detecting the taint of ‘bad’ blood. In the twentieth century, the Nazis sought to protect ‘pure’ German blood from becoming tainted by the blood of Jews. Professor Luckhurst explores literary and cultural representations of mixed blood.

Roger Luckhurst is Professor of Modern and Contemporary Literature at Birkbeck, University of London. He is a recognized expert on nineteenth century literature, pseudo-scientific thought, the Gothic and science fiction; and contributes to arts programmes on BBC Radio Three and Four.

This lecture is one of a series being held alongside the Blood exhibition at the Jewish Museum London (5 November 2015 – 28 February 2016), which was conceived in collaboration with the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism.

Genealogies of the Future

Speaker:     Professor Jonathan Boyarin, Cornell University
Date:         9 December 2015
Time:           6.30-8.00pm

Venue: Jewish Museum London, Raymond Burton House, 129-131 Albert Street, London NW1 7NB

Talk free with museum entry: To book your place email: admin@jewishmuseum.org.uk

The work of determining lines of Jewish kinship is primarily understood as oriented towards the past. Professor Boyarin discusses what happens when we start to think of Jewish genealogy and ‘blood ties’ as oriented towards the future.

Jonathan Boyarin is Mann Professor of Modern Jewish Studies and Professor of Anthropology at Cornell University. His work centers on Jewish communities and on the dynamics of Jewish culture, memory and identity.

This lecture is one of a series being held alongside the Blood exhibition at the Jewish Museum London (5 November 2015 – 28 February 2016), which was conceived in collaboration with the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism.

4 November 2015

Dr François Guesnet (UCL)

Delineating Jewish Intercession from Early Modern to 19th Century Europe: Attempts of a Definition

 

18 November 2015

Professor Stefan Reif (Cambridge)

Why Medieval Jewish Liturgy is not Dull

25 November 2015

Natalia Romik (UCL)

Post-Jewish Architecture of Memory within Former Eastern European Shtetles

 

16 December 2015

Dr James Aitken (Cambridge)

Scribal Culture and the Making of the Septuagint

                                                                                           

Wednesdays at 4 pm

A&H Staff Common Room

(1st Floor, Foster Court)

Follow our tweets at https://twitter.com/uclhjs

JEWISH STUDIES RELATED EVENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY

Thu 1 Oct 2015. George Brooke (Manchester), Aspects of Prophecy in the Dead Sea Scrolls. 2pm in Samuel Alexander Building A101 (Ehrhardt Seminar, CBS)

Tue 6 Oct 2015. Lauren Banko (Manchester), Fixed borders and flexible nationality: movement, transgression, and subversion of Palestinians in the Interwar Levant (MES research seminar) Time and venue TBA.

Tue 13 Oct 2015. Katharina Keim (Manchester), TBA. 4pm in Christie Room, John Rylands Library on Deansgate. (JRRI research seminar)

Thu 29 Oct 2015. Katharina Keim (Manchester), Joshua in the Samaritan Traditions in the Gaster Collection. 2pm in Samuel Alexander Building A101 (Ehrhardt Seminar, CBS)

Tue 3 Nov 2015. Maria Cioată  (Manchester), Moses Gaster’s Romanian Bird and Beast Stories (1915) and Benjamin Williams  (King’s College London), Interpreting the Bible in the Ottoman Empire. 12pm in Christie Room, John Rylands Library on Deansgate. (JRRI research forum)

Thu 19 Nov 2015. Esther Gomez Sierra (Manchester), A Unique Time: Converso Intellectuals in XV Century Spain. 4pm in Samuel Alexander Building A113. (R&Tresearch seminar)

Thu 19 Nov 2015. Stefania Silvestri (Manchester), The Medieval Hebrew Bible from Sepharad: Production and Patronage. 2pm in Samuel Alexander Building A101 (Ehrhardt Seminar, CBS)

Tue 8 Dec 2015. Stefania Silvestri (Manchester), TBA. 4pm in Christie Room, John Rylands Library on Deansgate. (JRRI research seminar)

Thu 10 Dec 2015. Mat Collins (Chester), Abandoning the Quest for the Historical Teacher: History and Ideology in the Qumran Dead Sea Scrolls. 2pm in Samuel Alexander Building A101 (Ehrhardt Seminar, CBS)

ISRAEL STUDIES SEMINAR PROGRAMME

As was the case in 2012, 2013 and 2014 the Centre’s seminar programme has an Israel Studies theme. Please note that the seminars will take place in thesecond semester on Thursdays at 4pm in room A113 in Samuel Alexander Building (Building 67 on the Campus Map, see directions). Our seminar programme is open to all (for free) and there is no need to book, but please see the statement below on University events open to the public.

Thu 18 Feb 2016. Roman Vater (Oxford), National alternatives to Zionism: the case of the Young Hebrews, 1939-1976

Thu 3 March 2016. Alan Craig (Leeds), EU-Israel relations: Sanctions by any other name?

Thu 17 March 2016. Nir Arielli (Leeds), Israel’s international ‘Machal’ volunteers in the war of 1948: a comparative assessment of their contribution

Thu 14 April 2016. Dominique Bourel (CNRS, Paris), From Kassa to Manchester and forward: Alexander Altmann and the Mendelssohn Forschung

Thu 21 April 2016. Yohai Hakak (Brunel), Forbidden Love and Moral Panic: Jewish-Arab Couples in Contemporary Israel

Thu 5 May 2016. David Novak (Toronto), Can Israel Be a Democratic Theocracy or a Theocratic Democracy?

 

For a complete list of events and updates to the programme, please see http://www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/research-seminars/ 

MONDAY 12th OCTOBER 2015

DR MARK MERRONY

(Director of Ariadne Galleries, London & New York)

FROM SITE TO SHOWCASE: ARCHAEOLOGY, COLLECTING,

AND THE GREAT DEBATE

6.30 pm  –  Reception

7.00 pm –   Lecture

Garden Room, Wilkins Building, UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT

(Organised jointly with the Institute of Jewish Studies)

 

TUESDAY 3rd NOVEMBER 2015

DR PAUL COLLINS

(Jaleh Hearn Curator of Ancient Near East

Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology University of Oxford)

THE IMAGE OF GOD IN THE ART OF ANCIENT ASSYRIA

6.00 pm Lecture Theatre G6, Ground Floor, Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H OPY.  Followed by refreshments.

(Organised jointly with the Institute of Archaeology, University College, London)

  

WEDNESDAY 16th DECEMBER 2015

PROFESSOR ALAN BOWMAN

(Camden Professor Emeritus of Ancient History, Oxford University)

DECODING THE PAST: ANCIENT DOCUMENTS AND MODERN TECHNOLOGY

6.00 pm Lecture Theatre G6, Ground Floor, Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H OPY.  Followed by refreshments.

(Organised jointly with the Institute of Archaeology, University College, London)

ADMISSION FREE WITHOUT TICKET

www.aias.org.uk – all enquiries 020 8349 5754

ANGLO-ISRAEL ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY

Affiliated to the British Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Reg. Charity 220367

 

 

 

PROGRAMME

VENUE: Highfield campus, building 34, room 5001.

Wednesday 1st July 2015

13:30 onwards: arrival of participants

14:00-14:30: welcome and introduction (Claire Le Foll)

14:30-18:00 Nation-building

with 30 min break between 15:30-16:00

Chair: Professor Mark Cornwall (University of Southampton) and Professor Mordekhai Zalkin (Ben Gurion University)

Anton Kotenko (Higher School of Economics, St Petersburg), “Jewish and Ukrainian entanglement around the concepts of national autonomy in 1905-1914”

Marharyta Fabrykant (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow /Belarusian State University, Minsk), “Pale of unsettlement: discourses on the Jewish issue in the early Belarusian nationalist movement, 1905-1918”

Felix Heinert (Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe (Marburg)/

University of Cologne), “Riga’s Jewish community, the “Riga Liberal Club” and the emergence of a transcultural liberal space in Riga around 1905”

Marcos Silber (University of Haifa), “The Jewish political elite in Vilnius and its discussion around emerging Lithuania, 1915-1918”

18:30 Conference dinner

The Goat, 47 Highfield Lane, Southampton SO17 1QD.

Thursday 2nd July 2015

9:00- 12: 00 Cultural interactions

Chair: Professor Joachim Schloer (University of Southampton)

Jurgita Verbickiene (Vilnius University), “Translations and self-representation: literature as a tool for a mutual Jewish-Lithuanian recognition”

Mayhill Fowler (Stetson University), “Jews, Ukrainians, Soviets: backstage in the Yiddish theatres of Soviet Ukraine”

Egle Bendikaite (Lithuanian Institute of History), “From certain desire or real need: the contexts of Lithuanian and Jewish cultural interactions after the failure of national autonomy”

Mikhail Krutikov (University of Michigan), “A city divided: ethnic spaces and everyday life in interwar Wilno in the prose of Moyshe Levin”

Lunch 12:00-13:00

13:00- 16:00 Questions of Identity

Chair: Professor Mikhail Krutikov (University of Michigan)

Akvile Grigoraviciute (Université Paris IV), “The dual role of the State in Jewish educational systems: the case of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia between the two world wars”

Sofia Grachova (European University Institute), “Mission Impossible? Ukrainian-Jewish history writing in Soviet Ukraine (1920s)”

Darius Staliunas (Vilnius), “How Jews were informed about Lithuanians on the eve of WW1”

Mordekhai Zalkin (Ben Gurion University), “Where does the “Leisves aleja” lead to? ”

 

Tea break: 16:00-16:30

Close of open session

 

16:30 – 18:00 Working meeting on the research project for invited participants.

 

There is a limited number of places. If you want to attend the workshop, please register with Claire Le Foll (c.le-foll@soton.ac.uk) by 26th June 2015.

A One Day Workshop at the Wiener Library, 5 June 2015. An event co-organised by the Wiener Library and the Parkes Institute, University of Southampton for its Jubilee Celebrations

The passing on of the generation of refugees from Nazism and survivors of the Holocaust has left behind its own personal archives, some in the private domain and others in formal repositories. What are scholars to make of this often intensely personal material which is so important in understanding the impact of persecution and displacement on the individual? Are there ethical issues of what can and cannot be used? And what further issues emerge if those confronting them have a close relationship to those who wrote or received such correspondence? This workshop will bring together scholars who have faced, or are facing, both the methodological issues of utilising this material and the ethical considerations of bringing it into the public sphere.

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/

http://www.southampton.ac.uk/parkes/index.page

Programme

9.00-9.30                     Registration and coffee

9.30-9.45                     Welcome

9.45-10.30                   Elizabeth Heinemann (University of Iowa): ‘Inheriting Estrangement: The Private Papers of a Contentious Family’

10.30-11.15                 Joachim Schloer (University of Southampton): ‘The challenge of incompleteness. How can we fill existing gaps in family papers’

11.15-11.45                 Coffee

11.45-12.30                 Esther Saraga (Retired Independent Researcher): ‘Daughter, researcher, academic – complex relationships to family papers’

12.30-1.30                   Lunch

1.30-2.15                     Shirli Gilbert (University of Southampton): ‘Displacement, loss and unlikely friendship in the shadow of the Holocaust: The Schwab family correspondence 1936-1971’

2.15-3                          Gur Alroey (University of Haifa): ‘Between history of immigration and history of immigrants: The Case of the Jewish Migration at the Beginning of Twentieth Century’

3-3.30                         Tea

3.30-4.15                     Christine Hartig (University of Innsbruck): ‘Family and Generational Relations in the Migration Process’

4.15-5pm                     Round table discussion and future research agenda

Speakers: Dr Omar Khan, Runnymede Trust; Dr Camilla Schofield, University of East Anglia; Dr Anastasia Vakulenko, University of Birmingham

Date: 16 June 2015

Time: 6.30-8.00pm

Venue: Birkbeck, University of London, Bloomsbury, WC1E 7HX, Room B33, Torrington Square main entrance

Free event open to all: Please register here.

This collaborative event marks the 50th anniversary of the UK’s first Race Relations Act. Three scholars working in this field reflect on the history of race relations law in Britain and offer their perspectives on what has been achieved, and looking forward, what still needs to be done:

  • History of ‘race relations’ and the Race Relations Acts – Camilla Schofield
  • Muslims, Jews and the Law – Anastasia Vakulenko
  • Racial Equality in the 21st Century – Omar Khan

These short talks will be followed by questions and answers and a general discussion around the issues raised.

This event is part of Birkbeck, University of London’s Social Sciences Week 2015.

Speakers: Bryan Cheyette, University of Reading; Derek J. Penslar, University of Oxford; and the University of Toronto; Gideon Rueveni, Centre for German Jewish Studies, University of Sussex; Yonatan Sagiv, Israel Institute, SOAS Centre for Jewish Studies, University of London; Adam Sutcliffe, Kings College London, Nadia Valman, Queen Mary, University of London

Date: 9 June 2015

Time: 11am – 5.30pm

Venue: Council Room, Birkbeck, University of London. Bloomsbury, WC1E 7HX, Torrington Square main entrance

Academic workshop: For scholars and research students. Please register here.

The workshop’s emphasis is on modern writing about Jews, money and economy. It aims to provide a forum for presenting and analysing the most recent critical and theoretical approaches for understanding self-representations of Jewish economic activity in modern Diaspora and the Land of Israel. The workshop will explore, among other topics: the varied textual constructions of the relationship between Jews and modern economics; Jewish writing on economy as a response to European dominant stereotypes on Jews and money, especially the double image of Jews as “conspiring bankers” or “degenerate paupers”; the participation, appropriation and subversion of antisemitic and philosemitic economic discourses by Jewish and early Israeli writers; and capitalist and socialist debates in the Zionist movement. In this vein, the workshop aims to trace the crucial role money and economy played in shaping modern Jewish and Israeli identities.

The organisers are grateful to the Israel Institute for its financial support.

The conference is hosted and funded by the Postcolonial Literatures Research Group of the Open University, with additional support from the British Jewish Contemporary Culture research network, Bangor University and the University of Winchester.

Judaism can be seen as a utopian religion: the Promised Land will be an ideal place and the messiah will bring about an ideal world. Read as literature, the Bible offers one of the principal sources of utopian thought in Britain and the Western World. Judaic utopianism has become British through the cultural practice of imagining Jerusalem in these isles. It is such a conjunction of Jewish and British cultural utopias, in contemporary British-Jewish culture, which this conference proposes to explore. Challenging utopia, there is also a British-Jewish imaginative paradigm of dystopia. This has existed, in particular, since the advent of modern European antisemitism with the Dreyfus Affair and continued in the wake of the Holocaust.

Topics addressed: utopias of assimilation, Zionism, modernism, liberalism, communism, aesthetics, domesticity and romance; dystopias of antisemitism, communism, Nazism, the Holocaust and contemporary Britain, and the overlap of these utopias and dystopias.

Keynote speaker: Bryan Cheyette (University of Reading).

Confirmed speakers: Nathan Abrams (Bangor University), Finn Fordham (Royal Holloway), Ruth Gilbert (University of Winchester), James Jordan (University of Southampton), Peter Lawson (Open University), Axel Stähler (University of Kent) and Sue Vice (University of Sheffield).

The conference will be held on Thursday 23 July 2015 at the Open University London Regional Centre, Camden, and lunch will be provided. In keeping with the Open University’s founding commitment to social equality and accessible education, there will be no registration charge. It is planned to publish the proceedings.

Venue: Open University, 1-11 Hawley Crescent, Camden Town, London NW1 8NP (9.30am start).

To book: one of the limited number of places, please register for the event as soon as possible (and no later than 9 July 2015). Proposals (no more than 500 words) and a one-page CV should be sent in an email titled ‘The Promised Land Conference’ to: britishjewishcontemporarycult@gmail.com. For further information, please contact the conference organiser: p.j.lawson@open.ac.uk

Wednesday May 6, 10:00 am – 4:30 pm,  Room 8, Sidgwick Site, Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

10:00-11:30

Prof Sidrah DeKoven Ezrahi, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem: From Zurishaddai’s Tent to a Tornado in Minnesota: The Shlemiel as Eternal Jew.

Dr Daniel Weiss, University of Cambridge, Reverent irreverence: rabbinic scriptural interpretation beyond the humorous/serious binary.

 

12:00-1:30

Dr Holger Zellentin, University of Nottingham, Rabbi Jeremiah and the Limits of Halakhic Humour.

Dr Laliv Clenman, Leo Baeck College and King’s College London, What’s so funny? When Bavli is humorous and Yerushalmi is serious.

 

2:30- 4:00

Dr Ron Naiweld, French National Centre for Scientific Research(CNRS) Paris, Parody of the ten martyrs’ narrative in Hekhalot Rabbati.

Dr Tali Artman Partock, University of Cambridge, Misinterpretation, misunderstanding and misogyny in Bereshit Rabba.

 

The sessions are free and open to the public. For further information contact Israel Institute Fellow, Dr. Tali Artman at ta378@cam.ac.uk, or Dr. Daniel Weiss at dhw27@cam.ac.uk .

The Oxford Biblical Hebrew Summer School will take place at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies in the Clarendon Institute Building in Oxford on September 1-11, 2015.

The school offers nine days of intensive teaching in biblical Hebrew. Each weekday there will be 3 hours of teaching, delivered in two separate 90 minute sessions, between 10:00 and 16:00.

The course corresponds to a term of intensive teaching for a full-time university student. It is open to students with or without experience of the language. The course is very demanding and the instructors will expect students to spend at least 4 hours per day in private study.

Applications should be submitted by Sunday May 31, 2015. Places are limited.

Please include in your application contact information for one academic referee.

The cost of the school is £200 per student for 27 hours of language instruction. This does not include any textbooks/workbooks, which the student will be expected to acquire for him/herself. The school is non-residential and there is no teaching at the weekends.

Successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date.

Jews Christians and Muslims in Europe 2015The Woolf Institute (Cambridge) is delighted to announce that applications are now being accepted for the e-learning course, Jews, Christians and Muslims in Europe: Modern Challenges.

This three-part e-learning course focuses on the relationships between Jews, Christians and Muslims in modern Europe. The course examines historical trends, religious and cultural interaction, and issues of contemporary citizenship.

The course will be led by Dr Gorazd Andrejč and co-taught by Dr Esther-Miriam Wagner, Sughra Ahmed, and Dr Christian Fuhr. For more information on the topics covered, the structure of the course, and the application details, please see here.

The e-learning approach allows participants to study wherever and whenever they choose via the internet. Many participants from across Europe and around the world – Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Poland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, as well as Australia, China, Indonesia, Japan, New Zealand, and the United States – have already taken this course.

The closing date for applications is 3 August 2015. The course commences, with Induction Week, on Monday 7 September 2015. The application form is available to download here. The course fee is £350. A limited number of bursaries are available.

If you have any queries about the course, contact Dr Emma Harris, Academic Coordinator, at eth22@cam.ac.uk.

Date: 12 & 13 June 2015; Venue: SOAS, University of London Brunei Gallery, room B102

The workshop, hosted by the Woolf Institute and the Centre for Cultural Literary and Postcolonial Studies, SOAS, explores how minorities are represented in the arts in the Middle East from the late nineteenth-century to the present day.

The panels: Gender and the Nation, Diaspora and Transnationalism, Representation and Image, & Transformation and Agency.

The Film “Jews and Muslims: Intimate Strangers” will be screened followed by Q&A with the filmmaker, Karim Miské.

For further information and to book your place, please see our Eventbrite page. (Deadline for booking your place is 1 June 2015.)

Flier Minorities and Popular Culture in Modern Middle East June 2015

Time: 6.30-8.00pm

Venue: Birkbeck, University of London, Bloomsbury, WC1E 7HX, Room B33, Torrington Square main entrance

Free event open to all: Book your place: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/trauma-on-the-eastern-front-european-jews-and-the-first-world-war-tickets-16107332465

In Jewish collective memory, the First World War has long been overshadowed by the incomparably greater disaster of World War Two and the Holocaust. But at the time, and for the following generation, Jews regarded the Great War as an unprecedented catastrophe. If for the Jews of eastern Europe in particular the war was a protracted trauma, its effects were profound also for Jews elsewhere in Europe and further afield in the United States and the Middle East. The importance of the war for European and global history has been evident for a hundred years. Its consequences and meanings for Jews and Jewish history, however, have received remarkably little attention. Only by understanding the Jewish experience of the First World War, David Rechter suggests, can we properly grasp the course of later Jewish history and the tragedy that was to come.

David Rechter is Professor of Modern Jewish History, University of Oxford. He is a specialist on post-Enlightenment central and eastern European Jewry and in that field focusses on the Jews of Habsburg Austria from the 1770s to the end of the First World War. His publications include: The Jews of Vienna and the First World War (Littman, 2001) and Becoming Habsburg: The Jews of Austrian Bukovina 1774-1918 (Littman, 2013).

Time: 6.30-8.00pm

Venue: Beveridge Hall, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Free event open to all: Book your place: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/why-are-we-obsessed-with-the-nazis-the-third-reich-in-history-and-memory-tickets-16081574422

The legacy of Nazi Germany still has a strong hold on us – in daily news stories, in bookshops and cinemas, on television and on the Internet. But how has our thinking about the Third Reich changed over the decades? In a rare public event, two of the world’s leading historians of modern Germany reflect on the ways in which our understanding of Nazi Germany has been transformed and continues to evolve.

The discussion will be followed by a reception to mark the recent publication of Richard Evans’ The Third Reich in History and Memory and Nikolaus Wachsmann’s KL: A History of the Nazi Concentration Camps.

Sir Richard J. Evans is President of Wolfson College, Cambridge, and Provost of Gresham College, London. His books include The Coming of the Third Reich (Penguin, 2003), The Third Reich in Power (Penguin 2005) and The Third Reich at War (Allen Lane, 2008). He is currently completing The Pursuit of Power: Europe 1815-1914, a volume in the Penguin History of Europe.

Sir Ian Kershaw was Professor of Modern History at the University of Sheffield until his retirement in 2008. His books include Hitler 1889-1936:Hubris(Norton, 1998) and Hitler 1936-1945: Nemesis (Penguin, 2000). He is currently completing To Hell and Back. Europe, 1914-49, a volume in the Penguin History of Europe.

Nikolaus Wachsmann is Professor of Modern European History at Birkbeck College, London. His books include Hitler’s Prisons. Legal Terror in Nazi Germany (Yale University Press, 2004) He is also the co-editor of Concentration Camps in Nazi Germany. The New Histories (Routledge, 2010).

Time and Place: Monday, 23 March 2015 from 17:30 to 18:30, Martin Hall, New College, Mound Place, Edinburgh EH1 2LX.

This is a public lecture, and will be followed by a Reception in Rainy Hall, New College at 18.30. Please register at http://bit.ly/DivSelf.

public-lecture-divinity-v2

In Muriel Spark’s papers it is evident that her journey to Jerusalem in 1961 – then a city divided between Israel and Jordan and the setting of the Eichmann trial – and the book to grow out of this experience, The Mandelbaum Gate, were of great importance to her. In what she calls “half-Jewish novel,” entitled after the only crossing point between the two parts of Jerusalem, she explores the divided city from the perspectives of her protagonists. Among the characters, who are Israelis, Arabs, and different British visitors, some choose to see only one perspective, while some see many, even in themselves. For example, Barbara, a British-Jewish convert to Catholicism is enabled to reconcile the two parts of her self, and Freddy, a diplomat ends up seeing much more than the “delightful English atmosphere” he initially longed for. In this talk I want to propose that Spark uses the characters’ divisions to take a stance against orthodoxies, whether they are religious or national, and instead points to the advantages of seeing a complex, challenging, and yet, richer world. The Mandelbaum Gate suggests that seeing more than one story in and of Jerusalem might be a way of overcoming division, a suggestion that is as wise today as it was in 1961.

Nina Fischer is currently the Edgar Astaire Fellow in Jewish Studies and a visiting fellow at IASH. Previously she has held fellowships at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and at the Australian National University. She has also served as the project manager of the ‘History & Memory’ research group at the University of Konstanz.

Nina’s research areas include Memory, Holocaust, and Middle Eastern Studies and she is currently writing a book on cultural representations of Jerusalem from the 19th century until today. Her recent publications on the subject include “Landscapes of Scripture and Conflict: Cultural Memories and the Israeli West Bank Barrier.” Landscapes 15, No. 2 (2014): 143-155 and “Graphic Novels Explore an (Un-)Holy Land.” Quest: Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, 6 (2013): 73-107.

Yerushah Lecture 2015 -- Leon RosselsonThe Cambridge Faculty of Divinity is pleased to announce that the 2015 Yerushah Lecture will take place at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 10 March, in the Runcie Room, Faculty of Divinity, West Road.

Leon Rosselson, songwriter and children’s author, will speak on ‘That Precious Strand of Jewishness That Challenges Authority.’  Mr Rosselson has been described by Songlines Magazine as having ‘the passion of Brel, the commitment of Brecht and the wit of Lehrer,’ and song performance will be incorporated into the lecture.  All are welcome, and refreshments will be served following the lecture.

The annual Yerushah Lecture in the Faculty of Divinity was established with a benefaction from the Righteous Persons Foundation, created by Steven Spielberg from the proceeds of his 1993 film Schindler’s List. ‘Yerushah’ is the Hebrew word for ‘heritage’. The Yerushah Lecture is devoted to Jewish heritage in all its aspects, with an emphasis on the transmission of Jewish identity and values across the generations.   

Weblinks:

http://www.divinity.cam.ac.uk/news/2015-yerushah-lecture-that-precious-strand-of-jewishness-that-challenges-authority

http://www.divinity.cam.ac.uk/research/special-lectures/yerushah-lecture

For a full outline of the seminar programme please see:

http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/english/research/racismseminar/ 

The conference is hosted and funded by the Postcolonial Literatures Research Group of the Open University, with additional support from the British Jewish Contemporary Culture research network, Bangor University and the University of Winchester.

Judaism can be seen as a utopian religion: the Promised Land will be an ideal place and the messiah will bring about an ideal world. Read as literature, the Bible offers one of the principal sources of utopian thought in Britain and the Western World. Judaic utopianism has become British through the cultural practice of imagining Jerusalem in these isles. It is such a conjunction of Jewish and British cultural utopias, in contemporary British-Jewish culture, which this conference proposes to explore. Challenging utopia, there is also a British-Jewish imaginative paradigm of dystopia. This has existed, in particular, since the advent of modern European antisemitism with the Dreyfus Affair and continued in the wake of the Holocaust.

Topics addressed: utopias of assimilation, Zionism, modernism, liberalism, communism, aesthetics, domesticity and romance; dystopias of antisemitism, communism, Nazism, the Holocaust and contemporary Britain, and the overlap of these utopias and dystopias.

Keynote speaker: Bryan Cheyette (University of Reading).

Confirmed speakers: Nathan Abrams (Bangor University), Finn Fordham (Royal Holloway), Ruth Gilbert (University of Winchester), James Jordan (University of Southampton), Peter Lawson (Open University), Axel Stähler (University of Kent) and Sue Vice (University of Sheffield).

The conference will be held on Thursday 23 July 2015 at the Open University London Regional Centre, Camden, and lunch will be provided. In keeping with the Open University’s founding commitment to social equality and accessible education, there will be no registration charge. It is planned to publish the proceedings.

Venue: Open University, 1-11 Hawley Crescent, Camden Town, London NW1 8NP (9.30am start).

To book: one of the limited number of places, please register for the event as soon as possible (and no later than Thursday 30 April 2015). Proposals (no more than 500 words) and a one-page CV should be sent in an email titled ‘The Promised Land Conference’ to: britishjewishcontemporarycult@gmail.com. For further information, please contact the conference organiser: p.j.lawson@open.ac.uk

The process by which some authoritative scriptures came to be included in the canons of Judaism and Christianity has received much attention. While light has been shed on the importance of scribalism, citation, rewriting, and community understanding, little attention has been placed on the implications in making some scriptures, and not others, authoritative.

The scope of this conference will revolve around the issues of historical, theological and ethical ramifications of canonization. What are the effects in elevating certain writings to the status of “Holy Scriptures”? Some texts have the power to define identity and orthodoxy, to inspire noble actions, and also to justify violence and prejudice. Is the belief in the holiness of certain texts a warrant for their use and misuse?

0900-0915 Welcome
0915-1000 John Collins (Yale University) “Uses of Torah in the Second Temple Period”
1000-1045 Michael Satlow (Brown University) “Bad Prophecies”
1045-1100 Coffee
1100-1145 Manfred Oeming (Universität Heidelberg) “The Way of God: Ethics and Ritual as Birthplaces of Canonicity”
1145-1230 Timothy Lim (University of Edinburgh) “The Insufficiency of Divine Inspiration”
1230-1330 Lunch
1400-1445 John Barton (University of Oxford) “How far does the content of canonical texts matter?
1445-1530 Walter Moberly (University of Durham) “Canonicity and religious truth: What role, if any, should a traditional canon play today?”
1530-1615 Craig Evans (Acadia Divinity School) “Jesus and the Beginnings of the Christian Canon of Scripture”
1615-1700 Tea
1700-1745 Shaye Cohen (Harvard University) “Some Reflections on the Canon”
1745-1800 Closing Remarks

For further information and how to book, please see:

http://conferences.hss.ed.ac.uk/power-authority-canon/

Oxford University Chabad Society in conjunction with the Berlin Family cordially invites you to the Second Annual Sir Isaiah Berlin Lecture:

Professor Yoram Hazony, ‘The Place of the Jew in Contemporary Philosophy and Theology’ 

Yoram Hazony is founder and former Provost of the Shalem College, President of the Herzl Institute in Jerusalem and Director of the John Templeton Foundation‘s project in Jewish Philosophical Theology. He is also a member of the Israel Council for Higher Education’s commission reviewing the General Studies and Liberal Arts programs in all of Israel’s universities and colleges. He is author of The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture (Cambridge University Press, 2012), The Jewish State: The Struggle for Israel’s Soul (Basic Books, 2000) and The Dawn: Political Teachings of the Book of Esther (Shalem, 2000). Two upcoming books include: Newton and Hume: On Science, the Mind, and the Nature of Reality; and God of This World (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Hazony has a B.A. in East Asian Studies Princeton University, and a Ph.D. from Rutgers University in Political Theory. He lives in Jerusalem.

Introduction will be given by Mr. Peter Halban, son of Sir Isaiah Berlin, on behalf of the Berlin family

Tuesday (week 4), 10 February, 8pm

Wine and cheese reception at 7pm 

At Slager Jewish student centre, 61 George St, Oxford, OX1 2BQ

RSVPinfo@oxfordchabad.org

All are welcome!

***

Oxford University Chabad Society www.oxfordchabad.org

Speakers: Marita Barthel-Rösing, psychoanalyst and filmmaker and Professor Stephen Frosh, Birkbeck, University of London. Chair: Professor Sasha Roseneil, Birkbeck, University of London

Date: Sunday 22 March 2015
Time: 2.00pm – 5.00pm

Venue: Birkbeck, University of London, Bloomsbury, WC1E 7HX, Room B33, Torrington Square main entrance

Free event open to all: Book your place http://www.pearsinstitute.bbk.ac.uk/events/events-calendar/enjoy-the-music/

This remarkable film-documentary tells the story of Edith Kraus a talented young Jewish pianist who survived the Theresienstadt (Terezin) ghetto by giving concerts. Edith Kraus tells her story – of trauma and of life – in words and music.

The film is the result of five years of interviews with Edith Kraus and was made by German group analyst/psychoanalyst Marita Barthel-Rösing and her husband, Wilhelm Rösing a documentary filmmaker. The trust that develops over this time, between Edith, a survivor of the Holocaust and the filmmakers from the country of the perpetrators, gives rise to an extraordinary relationship that enables the thinking and telling of trauma to be explored in a powerful and moving way.

The film will be followed by short talks by Marita Barthel-Rösing and Stephen Frosh, and an open discussion.

Dates & times:                    Sunday 15 February

9.00 am – 1.30 pm – Film screening, 1st Era
1.30 pm – 2.00 pm – Break
2.00 pm – 6.45 pm – Film screening, 2nd Era

6.45pm – 8.15 pm – Discussion

Speakers: Dr Ludivine Broch, University of Westminster and Associate of the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London; Professor Jane Caplan, Emeritus Professor of Modern European History, University of Oxford and Visiting Professor, Birkbeck, University of London; Professor, Michael Chanan, University of Roehampton

Venue: Birkbeck, University of London, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HX. Room B36, Torrington Square main entrance

Free event open to all:    Register your place: http://www.pearsinstitute.bbk.ac.uk/events/events-calendar/shoah/

This is a rare opportunity to see Shoah in its entirety. You may come for the whole day, to any part of the screening, or join us for the final discussion.

Shoah (Claude Lanzmann, 1985) is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of twentieth-century cinema. To mark the 30th anniversary of the film’s release, the Pears Institute devotes a day to screening this unique film in its entirety – nine hours – and to a discussion dealing with its significance as a cinematic work, as testimony, and as an interpretation of the Holocaust.

Lanzmann’s vision challenged all previous attempts at representing the Holocaust. By turning the bearing of witness into its subject, Shoah remains one of the most powerful cinematic experiences of all times. On the film’s release, Lanzmann commented, ‘I believe very deeply that art and morality are identical. I didn’t try to make a document but a real movie, and I wanted it to be beautiful,’ in order to ‘make the unbearable bearable.’

In the panel discussion that follows the speakers will consider the questions the film raises about history, testimony, artistic freedom and interpretation and the relationship of Shoah to these.

in collaboration with the Institute for Historical Research, supported by the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London

Speaker: Professor Atina Grossmann, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, New York

Date: 28 January 2015

Time: 6.30 – 8.00pm

Venue: Great Hall, British Medical Association House, Tavistock Square, London, WC1H 9JP

Free event open to all:Register your place: https://remappingsurvival.eventbrite.co.uk

In this lecture, renowned historian Professor Grossmann addresses a transnational Holocaust story that has remained untold: the plight of Jewish refugees in Soviet Central Asia, Iran and India. She seeks to integrate these largely unexamined experiences and lost memories of displacement and trauma into our understanding of the Shoah, and to remap the landscape of persecution, survival, relief and rescue during and after World War II.

Atina Grossmann is Professor of Modern European and German History and Women’s and Gender Studies at The Cooper Union, New York. Her recent books include: Jews, Germans, and Allies: Close Encounters in Occupied Germany (Princeton University Press, 2007) awarded the Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History from the Wiener Library, London and the George L. Mosse Prize,  American Historical Association; and After the Nazi Racial State: Difference and Democracy in Germany and Europe (University of Michigan Press, 2009).

Panel Discussion with Rt. Hon. Baroness Warsi PC; Eve Garrard, University of Manchester; Ed Kessler, Woolf Institute, University of Cambridge; Brian Klug, University of Oxford; Daniella Peled, journalist

Date: 10 December 2014

Time: 6.30 – 8.00pm

Venue: Birkbeck, University of London, Clore Lecture Theatre, Clore Management Centre , Torrington Square, WC1E 7JL

Free event open to all:    https://israelantisemitism.eventbrite.co.uk

The summer of 2014 will be remembered by many for the conflict between Israel and Gaza brought so vividly into our homes through daily news reporting. Its repercussions were also felt in Britain in another way, marked by a dramatic increase in recorded antisemitic incidents.

This panel discussion will reflect on the ways in which antisemitism figured in the controversies caused by the conflict. The speakers, representing a range of views on both Israel and Palestine and on the nature and significance of antisemitism in Britain, will explore: is there a climate of rising antisemitism in Britain? Does the charge of antisemitism levied at the critics of Israel silence legitimate concerns? What is the relationship between Israel and antisemitism in Britain today and how should the experiences of the summer inform debate in the future?

A drinks reception will follow the discussion.

About the speakers:

The Rt. Hon. Baroness Warsi PC was the first Muslim Cabinet Minister, appointed to office in 2010, and also Chairman of the Conservative Party from 2010-2012. In 2012 she became Minister for Faith and Communities and Senior Minister of State at the Foreign and Commonwealth office. Baroness Warsi resigned from Government in August 2014 over the Government’s stand on Gaza.

Eve Garrard is a moral philosopher and Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Manchester. Her current research interests focus on investigation of the concepts of evil and forgiveness. She is also a contributor to the on-line journal fathom.

Dr Edward Kessler MBE is founder and Executive Director of the Woolf Institute and a leading thinker in interfaith relations, primarily, Jewish-Christian-Muslim relations. He is vice-Chair of the Commission on Religion and Belief in British Public Life, chaired by Baroness Butler-Sloss. His most recent book is entitled, Jews, Christians and Muslims (SCM Press, 2013).

Dr Brian Klug is Senior Research Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at the University of Oxford. His research interests lie in ‘race’, racialisation and multiculturalism; Islamophobia and antisemitism; and Jewish identity. He is the author of Being Jewish and Doing Justice: Bringing Argument to Life (Vallentine Mitchell, 2011).

Daniella Peled is an editor at the Institute for War and Peace Reporting. A former foreign editor of the Jewish Chronicle, she writes widely on Israel and Palestine and is a regular contributor to Ha’aretz.

Wednesday 26 November 2014 – 5.30pm, B104, Brunei Gallery, SOAS

Wealth occupies an ambivalent position in the Hebrew Bible. On the one hand, material abundance is considered God’s gift to men. On the other hand, wealth has the potential to seduce one away from God. This ambivalence hints at the complicated relationship between economy and religion. While these two discourses are often considered separate, economic and divine circulations are mutually embedded, affecting each other in a series of negations, analogies and competitions.

Considering the complicated relationship between economy and religion, this lecture will explore the crucial position that money and economy occupy in Shmuel Yosef Agnon’s first novella And the Crooked Shall Be Made Straight, published in 1912 in the Land of Israel. The story of the bankruptcy of middle-class shopkeepers Menasheh Hayim and his wife Kreindel Tcharni in mid-nineteenth century Galicia exposes the economic infrastructure of religious thought, constructing capitalism and religion as two systems of debt and credit, destined for crisis. Whereas Menasheh Hayim’s subsequent journey as a beggar is constituted via debts to divine and monetary economies, his eventual death, exchanged for his wife’s life, functions as the only gift in Agnon’s text which bypasses the economy of debt and credit. Read this way, Menasheh Hayim’s death for a real other against the demands of an external economy becomes a critique of both the traditional and modern Jewish subject, constituted through debt to religion or its modern substitutes such as capitalism or Zionism.

All Welcome.

This event is free and there is no need to book.

09:30 – 12:00, S1, CRASSH, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, CB3 9DT

For more information and registration please see http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/25977.

In the long histories through which the sacred texts of Judaism, Christianity and Islam have come down to us from Late Antiquity, few eras were as consequential as the last quarter of the first millennium. This workshop will bring together senior and junior Cambridge scholars working on Jewish, Christian and Islamic textual traditions, to reflect upon the remarkably simultaneous (8th-10th centuries) attempts to stabilise the texts of the Hebrew Bible, the Latin Vulgate and the Arabic Qur’an. The workshop – a conversation between scholars sharing and discussing exemplary sources rather than a set of formal papers – will pay special attention to material, institutional, scribal and cultural phenomena common to all three traditions, as well as the 19th-century emergence of comparative, historical understanding of the textual scholarship practiced in Abbasid Baghdad, the Tiberias of the Massoretes and the Carolingian Renaissance.

Speakers:

  • Samuel Blapp
  • Theodor Dunkelgrün
  • Robert Evans
  • Zachary Giuliano
  • Geoffrey Khan
  • Rosamond McKitterick
  • Shady Hekmat Nasser

Convenors:

Theodor Dunkelgrün

Administrative assistance: bible@crassh.cam.ac.uk

 

Sunday, 30 Nov, 1pm-6pm at Slager Jewish student centre, 61 George St, Oxford, OX1 2BQ

Programme:

12pm Lunch

1pm Dr. Naftali Loewenthal, University College London

‘Maimonides and Devekut: Did Maimonides influence the Hasidim?’

Naftali Loewenthal lectures in Jewish Spirituality at University College London’s Hebrew and Jewish Studies Department. He is the author of Communicating the Infinite: the Emergence of the Habad School (University of Chicago Press: Chicago, 1990) and many articles, both academic and popular.

1.45pm Charles Philip Tajtelbaum, MA in philosophy and religion from Heythrop College London.

‘Maimonides & Theodicy’

2.30pm Professor Joanna Weinberg, University of Oxford

‘Maimonides on Martyrdom’

Joanna Weinberg is Catherine Lewis Fellow in Rabbinic Literature; James Mew Lecturer in Rabbinic Hebrew, University of Oxford; Reader in Hebrew and Jewish Studies, University of Oxford. She is co-author of ‘Midrash Unbound: Transformations and Innovations; (Littman Library of Jewish Civilization) and ‘I have always loved the Holy Tongue: Isaac Casaubon, the Jews, and a forgotten chapter in renaissance scholarship’ (Carl Newell Jackson Lectures).

3.15pm Coffee break

3.30pm Dr. Israel Sandman, University College London

‘Embracing the tensions in Maimonides’ theology’

Israel Sandman is a Fellow at the Hebrew & Jewish Studies Department at University College London and an expert on medieval Jewish philosophy and manuscripts.

4.15pm Daniel Herskowitz, Dphil candidate, Wolfson College, University of Oxford

‘Maimonides, Soloveitchik and Heidegger’

Daniel is from Kfar Adumim, outside Jerusalem. He earned a pre-induction BA in Philosophy and History cum laude in Open University, spent a year and a half in Ein-Prat Leadership Academy and then served  as a combat soldier, commander and Company Sergeant Major in Special Unit 401 for the IDF Armored Corp. Daniel participated in Operation ‘Cast Lead’ (2009). He concluded his master’s degree in Philosophy at Hebrew University, and is writing his thesis at Oxford about the notions of Community and Peoplehood in the thought of Rav Soloveitchik and Martin Heidegger under the guidance of Prof. Paul Mendes-Flohr. 

5pm Dr. Peter Hunter, Blackfriars Hall, University of Oxford

‘Thomas Aquinas and Maimonides’ 

Dr. Peter Hunter teaches philosophy at Blackfriars Hall, University of Oxford. He studied mathematics in Cambridge, and philosophy and theology at Oxford, before obtaining a doctrorate in philosophy from King’s College, London. His current interests include the relationship between science and religion.

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Maimonides Exhibition

A popular exhibition on Maimonides’ life and teachings will be on display with colour prints of some of the illuminated manuscripts of his works in the British Library.

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RSVP: info@oxfordchabad.org / 07772 079 940

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All are welcome!

Despite progress in both historical studies and interfaith relations, Jews and Christians continue to misunderstand each other, and to misunderstand the relationship of the New Testament to its Jewish context. By looking at major parts of the New Testament – the Christmas story, the sermon on the mount, the passion narrative, the letters of Paul, and the epistle to the Hebrews – we can see how and why the followers of Jesus of Nazareth dialogued with, debated, and sometimes defamed their fellow Jews. We also find, in doing the historical work, that Jews and Christians have much to celebrate both in terms of what they hold in common and in areas where they came to differ.

In this year’s series of Cadbury Lectures Professor Levine provides a historically informed and theologically sensitive reading of those New Testament passages that some claim to be anti-Jewish, rooted in a recognition that both Judaism and Christianity formed their identities in dialogue and debate with each other. The series explores and celebrates where Judaism and Christianity agree, as well as where they disagree.

For more information, go to:

http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/ptr/departments/theologyandreligion/events/2014/cadbury-2014.aspx

Venue:

Birkbeck, University of London, Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 7HX, Room B34, Torrington Square entrance.

Free event open to all:

Please register your interest (https://historyofritualmurder.eventbrite.co.uk)

The Life and Passion of William of Norwich, written in the twelfth century by Thomas of Monmouth a Benedictine monk, contains the earliest accusation that Jews killed a Christian child for hate of Christians and their beliefs. Such accusations were repeated over the centuries, in Europe and beyond. Believed by some and dismissed by others, they sometimes led to violence.

Miri Rubin’s lecture demonstrates the involvement of scholars and monks, bureaucrats and opportunists in attempts to make the accusation work. The story of child murder – first told in Norwich around 1150 – is as revealing about Christians as it is about Jews, both in the Middle Ages and since.

Miri Rubin is Professor of Medieval and Early Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London. She regularly appears on radio and television. Professor Rubin’s research interests lie in the study of the religious culture of Europe from 1100-1600. Her books include: Corpus Christi: the Eucharist in Late Medieval Culture (Cambridge University Press, 1991); and Gentile Tales; the Narrative Assault on Late Medieval Jews (Yale University Press, 1999; reprinted, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004).

We are pleased to announce that an international conference entitled Transnational Holocaust Memory will take place on 26-27 January 2015 at the University of Leeds. Recognizing that Holocaust ‘memory’ (in the broadest sense) is increasingly shaped by transnational forces such as mass migration, global travel and tourism, economic globalization, digital media and the internet, this conference will explore the future of Holocaust memory in shifting international contexts.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Professor Marianne Hirsch (The Generation of PostmemoryGhosts of Home, Family Frames)
  • Professor Leo Spitzer (Ghosts of Home, Hotel Bolivia)
  • Eva Hoffman (After Such Knowledge, Lost in Translation)
  • Professor Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela (A Human Being Died That Night)
  • Professor Stef Craps (Postcolonial Witnessing)
  • Professor Lyndsey Stonebridge (The Judicial Imagination)
  • Professor Sue Vice (Holocaust Fiction)
  • Professor Robert Eaglestone (The Holocaust and the Postmodern)

To download the Call for Papers please click [HERE].

Registration will open shortly after the deadline for panels and proposals on 1 October 2014. The conference registration fee will be £50 and £20 for students (including postgraduates). Certain panels will be free and open to students and the public.

A small number of bursaries, up to a maximum limit of £100, will be made available to postgraduate students whose papers are accepted, as a contribution towards the costs of travel and accommodation. Postgraduate students wishing to be considered for a bursary are asked to include an estimate of their travel costs in their application. In addition, postgraduate students from the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York who are members of the White Rose College of the Arts and Humanities will be eligible to claim costs through the Researcher Training Mobility (RTM) fund. Further details will be posted on this page once registration opens.

The conference will feature a number of public engagement events, including a play produced with a local theatre company and the launch of a public exhibition, developed in partnership with the South African Holocaust and Genocide Foundation, about Germany’s confrontation with its past. It will also include a masterclass on ‘Engaging with non-academic partners’ for postgraduates.

Alongside the conference, we are also establishing an informal network of scholars and professionals with an interest in transnational Holocaust memory. If you would like to be a member of this network with your interests and expertise listed on this website, please send a short biographical note and photograph to Dr Matthew Boswell (m.boswell@leeds.ac.uk).

For updates on the conference and the discussion of Holocaust memory more broadly, please follow us on Twitter at @TransHoloMemory.

This event is kindly supported by the Worldwide Universities Network and the White Rose College of the Arts and Humanities.

 

Oxford University Chabad Society warmly invites you to a Pre Rosh Hashana Jewish New Year

Yom Limmud SEMINAR IN JEWISH STUDIES

Exploring Jewish Philosophy, Mysticism and History

Sunday, 14 September, 1pm-4pm

Programme:

12pm Lunch

1pm Rabbi Yehudah Black, Kenton Synagogue

‘The dramatic history of the liturgy of the High Holidays prayer book’

Yehudah Black is senior rabbi at Kenton United Synagogue and is former Rabbi at United Hebrew Congregation of Newcastle upon Tyne. He author of ‘Apple Dipped in Honey’ which is a commentary on the Prayers for the Yomim Noraim, and ‘Challah dipped in Salt’, a guide and companion to the Shabbat Service.

1.45pm Dr. Israel Sandman

‘Transfusing the Hidden G-d? An Accounting of Soul based on a discourse by the Lubavitcher Rebbe’

Israel Sandman is a Fellow at the Hebrew & Jewish Studies Department at University College London and an expert on medieval Jewish philosophy and manuscripts.

2.30pm: Coffee break

2.45pm Esther Shallan, Philosophy of Religion, Oxford Brookes University

‘The Norwich Blood Libel Through the Ages’

3.30pm Dr. Naftali Loewenthal

‘Contrasting Perspectives on the High Holy Days: Judgement or spiritual Empowerment’

Naftali Loewenthal is lecturer in Jewish Spirituality at University College London’s Hebrew and Jewish Studies Department. He is the author of Communicating the Infinite: the Emergence of the Habad School (University of Chicago Press: Chicago, 1990) and many articles, both academic and popular.

At Slager Jewish student centre, 61 George Street, Oxford, OX1 2BQ

RSVPinfo@oxfordchabad.org

All are welcome!

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Oxford University Chabad Society

Www.oxfordchabad.org

Never has there been a greater need for an understanding of other faiths and relations between faiths. No two world religions are closer together than Judaism and Islam. In some instances, the similarities underpin shared advocacy and politics, as in Europe around protection of Halal and Kosher meat practices. Yet, too often, Judaism and Islam seem to be in conflict, particularly in the Middle East.

The Woolf Institute (Cambridge), in partnership with the School of International Service at the American University in Washington, is delighted to announce that the e-learning course, Bridging the Great Divide: the Jewish-Muslim Encounter, will be offered again in 2015.

This 15-week e-learning course will explore the history, culture and theology of Muslims and Jews, reflecting on similarities and differences as well as the major challenges. Assisted by leading scholars in the US and Europe with a wealth of experience in this field, the course will also offer strategies for building bridges between the communities.

Because this course is committed to the highest levels of scholarly integrity, it will provide a space for the discussion of the entire range, in the broadest sense, of the Jewish-Muslim encounter. This discussion does not preclude more controversial issues.

Applications are now being accepted for the course starting week commencing 12 January 2015. (The deadline for applications is 5 December 2014.)

The course fee for Woolf Institute students is £465. A limited number of bursaries are available.

For further details, visit http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/study/e-learning/mj.asp.

Bridging the Great Divide the Jewish-Muslim Encounter

Scottish Jewish Arts and Scottish Jewish Life 1914 to 2014.  Rozelle House, Ayr, Sunday 14th Sept 12 noon to 3 pm, Monday 15th Sept, 11am to 4 pm, with a chance to see the Cultural Connections exhibition of drawings, paintings and sculpture by artists Benno Schotz, Josef Herman, Jankel Adler, Hannah Frank, and others.

The conference is organised by SCoJeC, the Scottish Council of Jewish Communities, and the Scottish Jewish Archives Centre, as part of the ‘European Days of Jewish Culture and Heritage’   See the full programme at this link.http://www.scojec.org/news/2014/14vii_cultural_connections/conference_programme.pdf. A highlight of the Sunday is a talk on the history of the Jewish community in Ayr by Harvey Kaplan, Director of the Scottish Jewish Archives Centre. Monday’s highlights include the film ‘Hannah Frank, the Spark Divine’ together with a talk by director Sarah Thomas about the making of the film – and a presentation by Deborah Haase on the artist Hilda Goldwag.

The conference is free but we would ask for a minimum donation of £5 to cover refreshments each day. We can help with transport from Glasgow – email fiona@scojec.orgTo book email maclaurinfestival@gmail.com, or tel: 01292 443708

The Origins of the Origins of Evil: Contesting Interpretations of the ‘Evil Inclination’ (yētser hara) within Judaism and its Impact on Early Christian Thought

2-4 September 2014
Fitzwilliam College, University of Cambridge

All welcome.

Student bursaries still available to cover accommodation and food.

More details at: http://www.divinity.cam.ac.uk/research/conferences/origins or contact James Aitken, jka12@cam.ac.uk

2014 celebrates the 450th anniversary of the births of the playwrights, William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe. The Woolf Institute (Cambridge) is delighted to announce the introduction of a new Online Short Course, Shakespeare and the Jewish-Christian Encounter: Beyond The Merchant of Venice.

In this course, participants will explore the encounter with the ‘Other’ as portrayed by William Shakespeare and two of his contemporaries, Christopher Marlowe and Elizabeth Cary, Lady Falkland. You will be introduced (or, perhaps, re-introduced) to a selection of plays, investigating their language and imagery in both historical and literary contexts. The course encourages you to develop a knowledge, understanding and enjoyment of key Renaissance plays within a discussion of the ‘encounter’ [interfaith and intra-faith]; to appreciate the texts from the period in which they were written; and to challenge your own ideas and perceptions of the material covered. Ben Jonson (1572-1632), a contemporary of Shakespeare, declared of the playwright, he was ‘not for an age, but for all time’. Indeed, Shakespeare’s legacy lives on and, throughout the centuries, there have been different visual depictions of his plays. In the course, we will look at 19th- to 21st-century visual representations of the scenes and characters.

Our Online Short Courses offer participants the unique opportunity to engage in interfaith studies within an e-learning environment and provide them with a flexible approach to learning – study anywhere at any time. These Online Short Courses are available to join 365 days of the year. Designed as seven-week courses (including introductory and concluding sessions), participants will be able to view their chosen course for ten weeks. Participants will receive individual tutor support and feedback (but no formal grading). They will use Moodle (a virtual learning environment) to access their chosen course and be provided with all the necessary resources to complete the course. Those who engage fully in their chosen course will receive a Woolf Institute Certificate of Completion.

Join the course today! For further information about the Online Short Course, Shakespeare and the Jewish-Christian Encounter: Beyond The Merchant of Venice, contact Dr Emma Harris at eth22@cam.ac.uk<mailto:eth22@cam.ac.uk> or visit: http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/study/e-learning/short-courses.asp.

The Woolf Institute (Cambridge) is delighted to announce that applications are now being accepted for the e-learning course, Jews, Christians and Muslims in Europe: Modern Challenges.

This three-part e-learning course focuses on the relationships between Jews, Christians and Muslims in modern Europe. The course examines historical trends, religious and cultural interaction, and issues of contemporary citizenship.

The course will be led by Dr Gorazd Andrejč. Dr Andrejč’s areas of expertise include interfaith relations, theology, philosophy, and Balkan history. Find out more about Jews, Christians and Muslims in Europe: Modern Challenges at: http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/study/e-learning/jcme.asp.

The e-learning approach allows participants to study wherever and whenever they choose via the internet. Many participants from around the world – Australia, Belgium, China, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Indonesia, Japan, Poland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States – have already taken this course.

The closing date for applications is 4 August 2014. The course commences, with Induction Week, on Monday 1 September 2014. The application form is available to download here. The course fee is £350. A limited number of bursaries are available.

If you have any queries about the course, contact Dr Emma Harris, Academic Coordinator, at eth22@cam.ac.uk.

If you are planning to attend an event advertised here, please check the details with the local organiser of the event beforehand to avoid disappoinment.