Reminder: British Association for Jewish Studies Annual Conference (Durham 9-11 July 2018) – submission of paper and panel proposals by 23 February

British Association for Jewish Studies Annual Conference, Durham 9-11 July 2018

 Theories and Histories: Jewish Studies Across Disciplines

Deadline extended for submission of paper and panel proposals: 23 February, 2018

We gratefully acknowledge the following institutions for their support of the conference:

  • the European Association for Jewish Studies (EAJS).
  • St Aidan’s College, Durham University.

Call for Papers:

The annual conference of the British Association for Jewish Studies 2018 will seek to put key Jewish Studies questions in dialogue with broader intellectual concerns of different academic disciplines. What do varying understandings of what it means to be Jewish tell us about contemporary constructions of what it means to be a human being and a fellow citizen? In what ways does research into Jewish diasporas contribute to debates about transnationalism? How does the diversity of Jewish communities’ sociality, religion and culture reflect the social diversity of their localities? The conference will explore how Jewish Studies can both engage with existing intellectual agendas of the humanities and social sciences and provide a model for inquiry that goes beyond disciplinary boundaries. We welcome papers that explore Jewish traditions in different parts of the world and in different historical periods. Topics examined in the conference can include, but won’t be limited to the following:

  • Diversity in Jewish histories and cultures
  • Israel and Diaspora
  • Jewish Studies at the intersection with critical race studies and gender theory
  • Judaism, religion and secularism
  • Jewishness, arts and literature
  • Jewish Studies, colonialism, and postcolonialism

As usual with BAJS conferences, papers on topics unrelated to the conference theme are also welcome, including proposals by graduate students wishing to present on their doctoral research.

Confirmed keynote speakers and preliminary titles:

  • Professor Bryan Cheyette (Reading) The Ghetto as Travelling Concept
  • Professor Martin Goodman (Oxford) The History of Judaism and the History of Religions
  • Professor Susannah Heschel (Dartmouth) Theorizing Jewish Studies: Race, Gender and Empire
  • Professor Fania Oz-Salzberger (Paideia) Truth, Story, and History: Jewish Studies Across Disciplines

Paper proposals should include an abstract of no more than 300 words and a speaker biography of 100 words max.

Panel proposals should include a rationale for the panel of no more than 500 words, abstracts of 300 words max for each paper proposed as part of the panel and speaker biographies of no more than 100 words.

Speakers are allocated 30min for their presentation and questions. Usually papers are c.20min in length, allowing for 10min of questions and discussion.

We have a limited number of bursaries available for postgraduate students and early career researchers. If you would like to be considered, please state this in your proposal and send your CV.

Please send paper and panel proposals and all conference-related correspondence to BAJS.2018@dur.ac.uk

Conference booking will open early in March and delegates will be asked to register by 15 April 2018.

 

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CfP, ‘Urban Jewish Heritage: Presence and Absence’, 3-7 September 2018, Krakow

International Conference Announcement
Call for Papers

Urban Jewish Heritage: Presence and Absence
3-7 September 2018
Krakow, Poland

We are delighted to announce an important international Conference which is taking place as part of the European Year of Cultural Heritage in 2018. Urban Jewish Heritage: Presence and Absence is being held from 3-7 September 2018 in the World Heritage City of Krakow, Poland.  The Conference will bring together academics, planners, policy makers and community leaders to examine and discuss the pasts, presents and futures for towns and cities with Jewish Heritage, particularly in Europe.

Over the centuries, cities across Europe and around the world have been impacted by their Jewish communities; as places of both presence and absence. This Conference is dedicated to addressing Urban Jewish Heritage and the multi-layered issues it faces. The Conference recognises that the threats to Jewish heritage are complex and dynamic and there is a need to identify new thinking to preserve and sustainably manage both the tangible and intangible aspects of Jewish culture and to communicate this to a wider audience. As such, it seeks to address the following questions:

  • What are the pressures upon Jewish heritage in the urban context, and what levels of protection and conservation are in place to deal with such pressures?
  • How can new and sensitive uses be found for Jewish heritage in towns and cities?
  • What management models can be applied to Jewish heritage to ensure its sustainability?
  • What forms of relationships exist between Jewish heritage sites and urban tourism?
  • What are the touristic experiences with Jewish heritage?
  • To what extent is the interpretation of Jewish heritage effective and geared to an increasingly cosmopolitan and younger audience?
  • What is the role of the museum in the mediation and representation of Jewish heritage?
  • How is the intangible cultural heritage of the Jewish community communicated?

Call for papers deadline: 9 April 2018
Organised by the Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage and the Foundation for Jewish Heritage, in association with the City of Krakow and Villa Decius Association, we invite abstracts of 300 words to be submitted as soon as possible but at the latest by 9 April 2018.

For more information: https://urbanjewishheritageconference.wordpress.com/?mc_cid=16313cf85b&mc_eid=8397bc439f

 

 

 

CfP, British Association for Jewish Studies Annual Conference, Durham 9-11 July 2018 (updated contact information)

British Association for Jewish Studies Annual Conference,

Durham 9-11 July 2018

 Theories and Histories: Jewish Studies Across Disciplines

We gratefully acknowledge the following institutions for their support of the conference:

  • the European Association for Jewish Studies (EAJS).
  • St Aidan’s College, Durham University.

Call for Papers:

The annual conference of the British Association for Jewish Studies 2018 will seek to put key Jewish Studies questions in dialogue with broader intellectual concerns of different academic disciplines. What do varying understandings of what it means to be Jewish tell us about contemporary constructions of what it means to be a human being and a fellow citizen? In what ways does research into Jewish diasporas contribute to debates about transnationalism? How does the diversity of Jewish communities’ sociality, religion and culture reflect the social diversity of their localities? The conference will explore how Jewish Studies can both engage with existing intellectual agendas of the humanities and social sciences and provide a model for inquiry that goes beyond disciplinary boundaries. We welcome papers that explore Jewish traditions in different parts of the world and in different historical periods. Topics examined in the conference can include, but won’t be limited to the following:

  • Diversity in Jewish histories and cultures
  • Israel and Diaspora
  • Jewish Studies at the intersection with critical race studies and gender theory
  • Judaism, religion and secularism
  • Jewishness, arts and literature
  • Jewish Studies, colonialism, and postcolonialism

As usual with BAJS conferences, papers on topics unrelated to the conference theme are also welcome, including proposals by graduate students wishing to present on their doctoral research.

Confirmed keynote speakers and preliminary titles:

  • Professor Bryan Cheyette (Reading) The Ghetto as Travelling Concept
  • Professor Martin Goodman (Oxford) The History of Judaism and the History of Religions
  • Professor Susannah Heschel (Dartmouth) Theorizing Jewish Studies: Race, Gender and Empire
  • Professor Fania Oz-Salzberger (Paideia) Truth, Story, and History: Jewish Studies Across Disciplines

Paper proposals should include an abstract of no more than 300 words and a speaker biography of 100 words max.

Panel proposals should include a rationale for the panel of no more than 500 words, abstracts of 300 words max for each paper proposed as part of the panel and speaker biographies of no more than 100 words.

Speakers are allocated 30min for their presentation and questions. Usually papers are c.20min in length, allowing for 10min of questions and discussion.

We have a limited number of bursaries available for postgraduate students and early career researchers. If you would like to be considered, please state this in your proposal and send your CV.

Please send paper and panel proposals and all conference-related correspondence to BAJS.2018@dur.ac.uk

Deadline for submission of paper and panel proposals: 31 January 2018

Conference booking will open early in March and delegates will be asked to register by 15 April 2018.

 

Correction: CfP, ‘Jews and Strangers’, 3 July 2018.

Call for papers

One-Day International Conference on 3 July 2018, hosted at Leo Baeck College in London (UK)

JEWS AND STRANGERS

Since the Diaspora, Jews have been forced to adopt the role of the stranger. Edmond Jabès even writes that when one says ‘stranger’ one thinks ‘Jew’. While this concept is deeply embedded in the Jewish psyche the goal of this conference is to explore how Jews engage with strangers, Jews and non-Jews. This is a topical subject in the 21. century because increasing migration creates a tension between globalisation and identity. This theme can be approached from many angles and applied to many disciplines such as philosophy (Simmel, Levinas), history (Menachem Begin and boat people from Vietnam), film studies (Eran Riklis’ 2014 film Dancing Arabs/ A Borrowed Identity) or literature (Israel Zangwill, Philip Roth).

Questions that may be addressed include, but are not limited to: How does the stranger transport Jews back to their past as strangers? Is it a healing opportunity for Jews? In which ways do they participate in shaping the Jewish identity? How did Jews help strangers (adoption, shelter)? What issues arise from this? How do Jews reconcile their desire to help strangers with the fear of danger strangers might bring to their community? Can strangers be considered as a device leading Jews to self-introspection and eventually enlightenment through spreading new values? Finally, could strangers offer an opportunity to fight against anti-Semitism?

The keynote speaker is Professor Maurice Samuels, the Betty Jane Anlyan Professor of French (Yale, USA) and Director of the Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism.

Please submit an abstract of your paper (no more than 300 words in English) along with a brief biographical note to the conference organisers, Professor Joachim Schlör (University of Southampton, UK) and Dr Catherine Bartlett (University of Surrey, UK) at jewsandstrangers2018@gmail.com

The deadline for submission is 31. December 2017. Notice of acceptance will be sent by 31. January 2018. Paper presentations should not exceed 20 minutes. There will be an opportunity for the best papers to be published in a book after the conference.

The conference fee is £60 and includes tea/coffee breaks with pastries, a buffet lunch and an afternoon tea, all Kosher (Masorti), prepared and served by The Strudel Café on the premises.

Registration is open to all, and since places are limited, early registration is recommended to avoid disappointment. To register : send an email indicating your title, name and affiliation to jewsandstrangers2018@gmail.com, and pay at https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=5QF4Q52LSA4Z2

 

CfP, EAJS 2018: The fate of Hebrew manuscripts, collections/collectors and scholars in the 20th century

CfP, EAJS 2018: The fate of Hebrew manuscripts, collections/collectors and scholars in the 20th century 

For EAJS Cracow 2018, I am looking for historical and historiographical papers about the fate of Hebrew manuscripts, manuscript collections, and manuscript collectors and scholars in the 20th century. The rupture of 1933-45 looms large, of course, and continues to cast its shadows, but participants are free to explore also other turning points, including WWI, the formation of collections beyond Europe, recent dispersions of 19th century institutional collections and the formation of new institutional and private collections.

Please send me proposals  by Fri 13 October 2017 to clsef@leeds.ac.uk

Eva Frojmovic, Ph.D.
Centre for Jewish Studies
School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies
University of Leeds
UK — Leeds LS2 9 JT
clsef@leeds.ac.uk

 

CfP, ‘Emergent Religious Pluralism(s)’, 16-17 April 2018, Woolf Institute (Cambridge)

Conference on ‘Emergent Religious Pluralism(s)’

16-17 April 2018, Woolf Institute (Cambridge)

We invite 250-word abstracts for an interdisciplinary conference on the theme of ‘Emergent Religious Pluralism(s)’. The event will be held at the Woolf Institute in Cambridge, in April 2018 and will include a keynote talk from Professor Nasar Meer (University of Edinburgh).

Please submit your abstracts to John Fahy (jef96@georgetown.edu) by August 15th 2017.

Outline

The concept of religious pluralism has been at the centre of major political developments and discourse in recent years. The rise of the Hindu right in India has contributed to an increasing sense of marginalisation amongst non-Hindu minorities, and Muslims in particular. Donald Trump’s divisive rhetoric and persistent attempts to impose a Muslim travel ban have similarly left Muslim minorities in the U.S. feeling targeted. In war torn countries throughout the Middle East, the place of the dwindling Christian communities looks ever more precarious, and the rich tradition of pluralism seems to be disappearing. Across Europe controversial attempts, both legal and political, to manage the challenge of religious diversity have led to heated debates on how to deal with difference. At the heart of these developments, the very ideal of religious pluralism itself is being contested. But how have changing realities on the ground informed the ideal of religious pluralism itself in different parts of the world?

Religious pluralism has often been defined in relation to, but as distinct from, religious diversity. David Machacek defines pluralism as “meaningful diversity” (2003) while in Diana Eck’s (2006) words “pluralism is not diversity alone, but the energetic engagement with diversity”. It is not just tolerance, Eck writes, but “the active seeking of understanding across lines of difference”. The ideal of religious pluralism in the American context, at least, connotes integration, and not segregation. More than the merely descriptive diversity, it implies both evaluation and engagement. It is, in other words, a moral response to the existential fact of diversity.

That such definitions of religious pluralism can encompass the broad range of ways in which the challenge of religious diversity can (or should) be managed has been problematised. Taking account of the myriad social, political and historical factors that shape the kinds of religious pluralism that have emerged throughout the world, and throughout history, some now prefer to speak of ‘pluralisms’ (Marty 2007) or ‘modes of religious pluralism’ (Riis 1999). Such modes of religious pluralism are not simply alternative approaches to a common ideal, but constitute complex political responses to particular socio-historical challenges.

But what kinds of challenges elicit what kinds of responses? How is the ideal of religious pluralism conceived, constructed and contested in different parts of the world? Are there identifiable approaches to religious pluralism within or between different religious traditions? How might we describe the various ways in which the challenge of religious diversity is being responded to today, and who is responding? What is the relationship between everyday experiences of diversity, on the one hand, and ideals of religious pluralism, tolerance and coexistence, on the other?

This conference looks to explore the emergent conceptions of, and commitments to, the ideal of religious pluralism in different parts of the world. We invite submissions that engage with one or more of the following questions:

  • How are the ideals of religious pluralism changing in light of recent social and political developments? Are there identifiable ‘modes’ of religious pluralism emerging in different parts of the world? Do we find broader trends that transcend particularities of national (and nationalistic) political discourses?
  • In what ways can the history of religious pluralisms throughout the world, and across religious traditions, inform our understanding of recent developments? Is there anything new about how religious difference itself is being constructed and contested?
  • What is the relationship between religious pluralism and broader strategies for managing difference, such as multiculturalism? To what extent do ideals of religious pluralism reflect those of other pluralisms, for example, cultural, ethnic or national?
  • What kinds of responses are being offered to the challenge of religious diversity by both state and non-state institutions and actors? How is the challenge itself being articulated, and by who? How do the ideals of religious pluralism, tolerance and coexistence relate to the everyday experience of diversity?
  • What role do religious actors play? How are theological resources being mobilised to address the challenge of religious diversity, for example, through interfaith dialogue?

 

 

Conference on ‘Jewish Engagement with the Public Sphere: New Perspectives on Jewish Philanthropy’, University of Southampton

Jewish Engagement with the Public Sphere: New Perspectives on Jewish Philanthropy

Thursday, 15 June 2017

University of Southampton, Avenue Campus, 65/2117

A conference organised by the Parkes Institute for the Study of Jewish/non-Jewish relations, University of Southampton, in memory of Clemens Nathan

09.30 – 10.00     Registration and Tea and Coffee

10.00 – 10.15     Welcome: Joachim Schlör

10.15 – 11.00     Mirjam Thulin: More than Charity: The Dimensions of Tzedakah, c. 1750-1850

11.00 – 11.15     Tea & Coffee

11.15 – 12.00     Andrea Schatz: Alliances, Frictions, Splits: The Politics of Diaspora in Jewish Reports on the ‘Damascus Affair’

12.00 – 12.45     Björn Siegel, Joseph Ritter von Wertheimer & Baron de Hirsch: Modern Jewish Philanthropists and the Emergence of International Solidarity

12.45 – 14.15     Lunch

14.15 – 15.00     Micheline Stevens: The Jewish Education Aid Society

15.15 – 16.00     Tobias Metzler: Transnational Gateways: Urban Jewish Philanthropy in the Age of Migration

16.00 – 16.15     Tea & Coffee

16.15– 17.00     Markus Krah: Salman Schocken: Publisher, Patron, Philanthropist

19.00            Evening Dinner at Ceno’s

For further information on The Parkes Institute, please visit http://www.southampton.ac.uk/parkes/index.page

or email The Parkes Institute at parkes@southampton.ac.uk.

We are most grateful for the donation we received from the Nathan family that made this workshop possible.