Conference, ‘The Use and Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Antiquity’ (5–7 November 2018)

Conference,The Use and Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Antiquity’

Department of History, Religions & Philosophies, SOAS, University of London

in collaboration with the Faculty of Theology, University of Oslo, Norway

5-7 November 2018

SALT lecture theatre (S110, Paul Webley Wing)

Everyone is welcome – entrance is free of charge

 

Monday 5 November

14:00-14:15h: Introduction (Catherine Hezser, SOAS)

Session 1: Popular Religious Knowledge in Ancient Mesopotamia

14:15-15:00h: Andrew George, SOAS, University of London:

“Access to Religious Knowledge in Ancient Babylonia”.

15:00-15:45h: Sam Mirelman, SOAS, University of London:

“Public Lamentation in Ancient Mesopotamia”.

15:45-16:15h: Coffee break

Session 2: Judean Communities of the Second Temple Period

16:15-17:00h: Diana Edelman, University of Oslo:

“How was Jewish Religious Knowledge Disseminated in Judean Communities ca. 350-30 BCE?”

17:00-17:45h: David Hamidovic, University of Lausanne:

“The Production and Dissemination of Knowledge in the Community of Qumran”.

 

Tuesday 6 November

Session 3: Rabbis and “Popular” Judaism

9:30-10:15h: Philip Alexander, University of Manchester:

“’If They Are Not Prophets, They Are Sons of Prophets’: Folk Religion (minhag) as a Source of Rabbinic Law”.

10:15-11:00h: Catherine Hezser, SOAS, University of London:

“Interaction between Rabbis and Non-Rabbinic Jews in Palestinian Rabbinic Literature of Late Antiquity”.

11:00-11:30h: Coffee Break

Session 4: Liturgy and the Synagogue

11:30-12:15h: Anders Runesson, University of Oslo:

“The Role of the Synagogue in the Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Late Antiquity”.

12:15-13:00h: Stefan Reif, University of Cambridge:

“Medieval Jewish Prayers and Rituals as Religious Education”.

13:00-14:00h: Lunch break

Session 5: Near Middle Eastern Christian Communities

14:00-14:45h: Hugo Lundhaug, University of Oslo:

“The Use and Dissemination of Apocrypha in Egyptian Monasteries”.

14:45-15:30h: Erica Hunter, SOAS, University of London:

“Public and Private Religious Practices Amongst the Christian Communities of Mesopotamia”.

 

Wednesday 7 November

Session 6: Material Culture and Women’s Religiosity

9:30-10:15h: Annette Weissenrieder, University of Halle:

“The Function of Material Culture in the Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Ancient Christianity”.

10:15-11:00h: Christine Amadou, University of Oslo:

“The Tecla Tradition and Women’s Religious Knowledge in Early Christianity”.

11:00-11:30h: Coffee break.

Session 7: Reading, Education, and Scholastic Transmission

11:30-12:15h: Hindy Najman, University of Oxford:

“Reading Practices and the Vitality of Scripture”.

12:15-13:00h: Jan Stenger, University of Glasgow:

“Religious Knowledge and Models of Authority in Sixth-Century Gaza”.

13:00-13:45h: Holger Zellentin, University of Cambridge:

“The Transmission of Legal and Literary Features of Late Antique Literature into the Qur’anic Milieu”.

14:00-15:00h: Final discussions over lunch.

 

 

 

 

 

For further information please contact Prof. Catherine Hezser (ch12@soas.ac.uk)

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‘The Use and Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Antiquity’, Conference (5-7 November, 2018)

Conference: The Use and Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Antiquity

Department of History, Religions & Philosophies, SOAS, University of London

in collaboration with the Faculty of Theology, University of Oslo, Norway

5-7 November 2018, SALT lecture theatre (S110, Paul Webley Wing)

Everyone is welcome – entrance is free of charge

 

Monday 5 November

14:00-14:15h: Introduction (Catherine Hezser, SOAS)

Session 1: Popular Religious Knowledge in Ancient Mesopotamia

14:15-15:00h: Andrew George, SOAS, University of London:

“Access to Religious Knowledge in Ancient Babylonia”.

15:00-15:45h: Sam Mirelman, SOAS, University of London:

“Public Lamentation in Ancient Mesopotamia”.

 

15:45-16:15h: Coffee break

 

Session 2: Judean Communities of the Second Temple Period

16:15-17:00h: Diana Edelman, University of Oslo:

“How was Jewish Religious Knowledge Disseminated in Judean Communities ca. 350-30 BCE?”

17:00-17:45h: David Hamidovic, University of Lausanne:

“The Production and Dissemination of Knowledge in the Community of Qumran”.

 

Tuesday 6 November

Session 3: Rabbis and “Popular” Judaism

9:30-10:15h: Philip Alexander, University of Manchester:

“’If They Are Not Prophets, They Are Sons of Prophets’: Folk Religion (minhag) as a Source of Rabbinic Law”.

10:15-11:00h: Catherine Hezser, SOAS, University of London:

“Interaction between Rabbis and Non-Rabbinic Jews in Palestinian Rabbinic Literature of Late Antiquity”.

 

11:00-11:30h: Coffee Break

 

Session 4: Liturgy and the Synagogue

11:30-12:15h: Anders Runesson, University of Oslo:

“The Role of the Synagogue in the Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Late Antiquity”.

12:15-13:00h: Stefan Reif, University of Cambridge:

“Medieval Jewish Prayers and Rituals as Religious Education”.

 

13:00-14:00h: Lunch break

 

Session 5: Near Middle Eastern Christian Communities

14:00-14:45h: Hugo Lundhaug, University of Oslo:

“The Use and Dissemination of Apocrypha in Egyptian Monasteries”.

14:45-15:30h: Erica Hunter, SOAS, University of London:

“Public and Private Religious Practices Amongst the Christian Communities of Mesopotamia”.

 

Wednesday 7 November

Session 6: Material Culture and Women’s Religiosity

9:30-10:15h: Annette Weissenrieder, University of Halle:

“The Function of Material Culture in the Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Ancient Christianity”.

10:15-11:00h: Christine Amadou, University of Oslo:

“The Tecla Tradition and Women’s Religious Knowledge in Early Christianity”.

 

11:00-11:30h: Coffee break.

 

Session 7: Reading, Education, and Scholastic Transmission

11:30-12:15h: Hindy Najman, University of Oxford:

“Reading Practices and the Vitality of Scripture”.

12:15-13:00h: Jan Stenger, University of Glasgow:

“Religious Knowledge and Models of Authority in Sixth-Century Gaza”.

13:00-13:45h: Holger Zellentin, University of Cambridge:

“The Transmission of Legal and Literary Features of Late Antique Literature into the Qur’anic Milieu”.

 

14:00-15:00h: Final discussions over lunch.

For further information please contact Prof. Catherine Hezser (ch12@soas.ac.uk)

CfP: ‘Contemporary International Law, Jewish Law and Jewishness’. Jewish Law Association European Regional Conference Fürth-Nuremberg, 31 July – 2 August 2018

Call for Papers – Jewish Law Association European Regional Conference Fürth-Nuremberg, 31 July – 2 August 2018

Contemporary International Law, Jewish Law and Jewishness

The Jewish Law Association invites proposals for papers to be presented at the JLA European Regional Conference 2018. We particularly invite papers which address themes relating to one or more of the following areas:

  1. (a)  the significance of contributions made by Jewish lawyers for the development of the principles of international law, including the concept of „rights“;
  2. (b)  the influence of Judaism (whether Jewish Law, Jewish culture or Jewish history) on the contributions of Jewish lawyers to the practice and discourse of international law; and
  3. (c)  the shifting contexts of “international law“ for thinking about rights in Jewish Law and the rights of Jews, both as individuals and as Jews under international law.

As is the practice in JLA conferences, with a view to promoting wider exchange with scholars and practitioners from countries in which the study of Jewish Law is less developed than in Israel and the United States, proposals relating to other aspects of Jewish law will also be considered.

If you are interested in presenting a full paper or a poster for work in progress in the Young Researchers’ Atelier, please send an abstract of between 400 and 750 words to Stephan Wendehorst <stephan.wendehorst@univie.ac.at>, to be received no later than 20 May 2018.

The main, though not exclusive foci of the Fürth-Nuremberg regional conference of the Jewish Law Association will be:

Jewish Lawyers and the Development of Contemporary International Law: How did the Principles of International Law associated with the Charter of the Nuremberg Tribunal respond to the promptings of Jewish lawyers and the concerns of Jewish voices? What role have Jewish lawyers played in related areas of international law – from the Geneva Conventions, the Genocide Convention and the Universal Declaration on Human Rights to the development of new approaches to State and individual responsibility in matters of international criminal law since the Nuremberg Trials? In what ways has their Jewishness been seen to explain this?

Jewish Law, Human Rights and International War Crimes: How are the notions of universal rights and international war crimes understood in the contemporary development of Jewish Law? How has the development of the post-Westphalian state system affected Jewish legal works on the universality of rights, obligations and crimes? Does the treatment of rights in discussions of Jewish Law hold lessons for other legal systems?

International Law and Jewish Rights in the Inter-War, War and Immediate Post-War Period

The link between Raphael Lemkin, the Shoah, the United Nations, and the genesis of the Anti-Genocide Convention is arguably the most direct connection yet been made between a Jewish lawyer, a specifically Jewish experience and the emergence of an institution of international law. Perhaps its very prominence and the universality of ist legacy has obscured some of the complexity of the trajectory of its emergence. The conference will attempt to explore the United Nations Anti-Genocide Convention within two contexts, first, the broader struggle for Jewish rights in the interwar period, encompassing the diverse approaches of Zionist inspired Gegenwartsarbeit, Bundist demands for Jewish rights as a national minority, the Agudist agenda and Lucien Wolfs updated classical liberal concepts, and, secondly, the East-Central European interwar legal discourse regarding the protection of endangered minorities. How did Jewish lawyers address the challenges and the catastrophe of the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s? How did their efforts compare – and interact – with non-Jewish responses to related questions?

We welcome contributions from practitioners as well as established and emerging academics. In addition to sessions with full papers, we hope to have a range of research workshops for work in progress, and shorter presentations of early stage projects. Those wishing to register for the conference must be current members of the Jewish Law Association; discounted rates for membership are available to students, low or unwaged participants. Depending on funding, it may be possible to offer financial assistance to early career scholars or those without university support who would otherwise find attending the conference financially prohibitive.

The JLA 2018 regional conference will be hosted by the Institute for Legal and Constitutional History at the University of Vienna and the Jewish Museum of Franconia in Fürth, Schnaittach & Schwabach. It will take place in conjunction with the Summer Academy on the History of the Jews in the Holy Roman Empire and its Successor States. Further organisational details will be sent in due course.

Stefan Goltzberg, Brussels
Nechama Hadari, Hebden Bridge

Stephan Wendehorst, Gießen/Vienna

George Wilkes, Edinburgh

Founded in 1978, the Jewish Law Association seeks to promote study and research in Jewish Law. It provides a major interdisciplinary meeting point for scholars and practitioners in both Law and Jewish Studies. Its membership represents diverse religious, philosophical and intellectual perspectives, and is drawn from many nations, from Israel to Argentina, from Canada and the United States to Australia, from Western Europe to South Africa.

For further information about the Jewish Law Association please visit its website at: http://www.legaltheory.demon.co.uk/jlas/

 

Doctoral and Early Career research training at the University of Manchester, 26-28 June 2018

Doctoral and Early Career research training at the University of Manchester

The Centre for Jewish Studies at Manchester University is pleased to announce the third doctoral and early career research training event of the Northern UK Jewish Studies Partnership. PhD students and post-doctoral researchers from the Jewish Studies Partnership institutions and other Universities in the UK will meet for a range of training and information sessions on 26-28 June 2018 at the Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Manchester. The event will include advice sessions on REF2021, post-doc funding, and the advanced use of powerpoint, as well as a series of sessions on ‘Current Trends’ in fields of Jewish Studies, from studies of the Other in Judaism, to Jewish Literary Studies, digital humanities, and bibliographic studies.

This year there will be a special focus on getting involved in writing large grants and on the application and interview experience from the perspectives of both the applicant and selection panel. There will also be the opportunity for one-to-one discussions with mentors. For details including the provisional programme, online registration form, and financial assistence with travel and accommodation costs, see http://www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/n-uk-js-partnership/

Seminar: Jews, Roma and the Nordic Countries – Current Research, New Perspectives,  University College London, 6-7 September 2018

Seminar: Jews, Roma and the Nordic Countries – Current Research, New Perspectives

 University College London, 6-7 September 2018

Recent years have seen a rise in number of research projects that have dealt with the development of the social status of Jews and Roma in the Nordic welfare states. Individual projects and research teams have analysed migration, ethnic relations, social, economic and linguistic integration, and the boundaries of the welfare state. Antisemitism and Romaphobia, both historic and current, have also received academic attention. Today’s political climate in the Nordic countries has increased the need for research in these fields.

 The idea of the proposed seminar Jews, Roma and the Nordic Countries – Current Research, New Perspectives is to discuss recent research trends concerning Jews and Roma in the Nordic countries, and to acquaint scholars working on these themes in Finland, Scandinavia and UK.

 We welcome papers and presentations that discuss individual and/or group research projects in various disciplines, feature current research, deal with the gaps and demands in the field, and set future goals. Besides networking the seminar hopes to look into possibilities of joint applications for research projects.

 The seminar is arranged jointly by the UCL Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies, the UCL School of Slavonic and East European (SSEES) and the Centre for Nordic Studies (CENS), University of Helsinki. 

 There is no fee for the seminar. We are able include eighteen papers of presentation.

 If you wish to participate, please send the abstract of your proposed paper (300 words excluding references) and a short bio by 15 May 2018 to s.muir@ucl.ac.uk and r.valijarvi@ucl.ac.uk. Each talk is 20 minutes followed by 10 minutes of questions. We will notify the acceptance of your papers by the end of May.

 If you have any further questions please do not hesitate to get in touch with us.

 We look forward to seeing you in September,

Simo Muir
Riitta Valijärvi
Peter Stadius
Lily Kahn

Conference Programme, ‘Jews and Strangers’, 3 July, 2018

Programme for the conference JEWS AND STRANGERS at Leo Baeck College (London), 3, July 2018

8.45 – 9.15: registration

First Panel: Imagining the Stranger

9.15-10.35: Prof Efraim Sicher (Ben Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, Israel) ‘The Daughter of Germany: The Stranger Within the Jewish Imaginary’.

9.35-9.55: Dr Maxime Decout (Lille University, France) ‘Jews as Strangers, Strangers as Jews in the Post-War French Novel’.

9.55-10.15: Prof Jonathan Gill (Amsterdam University College, the Netherlands) ‘Show Yourself to Me: Diane Arbus’s Radical Otherings’.

10.15- 10.35: Dr Søren Blak Hjortshøj (Roskilde University, Denmark) ‘Boundaries of the Stranger: the Contributing Stranger, Cosmopolitanism and the Jewish Question’.

10.35-10.45: Questions

10.45-11.05: tea/coffee break

Second Panel: Jewish Stranger among Jews

11.05-11.25: Prof Chad Alan Goldberg (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA) ‘The Stranger in Germany and America’.

11.25-11.45: Dr Eyal Davidson (Orot Israel College and Herzog College, Israel) ‘The Attitude of the Jews in the Land of Israel toward the Marranos in the Sixteenth Century’.

11.45-12.05: Dr Federico Dal Bo (University of Barcelona, Spain) ‘“They Are Not My People” Mysticism and Political Extremism in Henry Bean’s Script The Believer (2001)’.

12.05-12.25: Dr Dani Kranz (Bergische University Wuppertal, Germany) ‘(Friendly Strangers in their Own Land? Third Generation Jews and Socio-Political Activism in the Present in Germany’.

12.25-12.35: questions

12.35-13.35: Lunch at the Strudel Café

13.35-14.35: Keynote lecture, followed by 10 minutes questions: Prof Maurice Samuels (Yale University, USA) ‘Friendship and Betrayal: The Duchess de Berry, Simon Deutz, and Modern France’s First Anti-Semitic Affair’

Third Panel: Jews, Strangers and Colonialism

14.35-14.55: Prof Shirli Gilbert (University of Southampton, UK) ‘Jewish Identity and Racism in South Africa’.

14.55-15.15: Dr Shira Klein (Chapman University, USA) ‘Strange Brothers: Italian Jews, African Jews, and the Colonization of Africa’.

15.15-15.35: Dr Claire Le Foll (University of Southampton, UK) ‘Jews and Poles in the Belorussian Provinces of the Russian Empire: The Confrontation of Two “Alien” Groups at the End of the Nineteenth Century’.

15.35-15.45: Questions

15.45-16.05: Tea/coffee break

Fourth Panel: Hosting the Stranger

16.05-16.25: Dr Mathias Berek (Technische Universität Berlin, Germany) ‘Rights of the Stranger in Jewish Moral: Reactions to M. Lazarus’ Ethics of Judaism in Imperial Germany’.

16.25-16.45: Dr Olga Tabachnikova (University of Central Lancashire, UK): ‘Russian Jewish Writers in the Post-Soviet World: The Question of Self-Identification in Literature and Life’.

16.45- 17.05: Dr Natan M. Meir (Portland State University, USA) ‘Strangers among us: The Outcasts of Jewish Society in Eastern Europe’.

17.05- 17.25: Dr Catherine Bartlett (University of Surrey, UK) ‘The Christian Orphan as the Stranger in Nineteenth-Century European Jewish Fiction’.

17.25-17.35: Questions.

17.35-19.00: Afternoon tea

As places are limited, early registration is advisable at:

https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin /webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_b utton_id=5QF4Q52LSA4Z2

The conference fees (£60) include tea/coffee breaks, Kosher lunch and Kosher afternoon tea.

For further information contact Dr Catherine Bartlett at: jewsandstrangers2018@gmail.com

Reminder: British Association for Jewish Studies Annual Conference (Durham 9-11 July 2018) – submission of paper and panel proposals by 23 February

British Association for Jewish Studies Annual Conference, Durham 9-11 July 2018

 Theories and Histories: Jewish Studies Across Disciplines

Deadline extended for submission of paper and panel proposals: 23 February, 2018

We gratefully acknowledge the following institutions for their support of the conference:

  • the European Association for Jewish Studies (EAJS).
  • St Aidan’s College, Durham University.

Call for Papers:

The annual conference of the British Association for Jewish Studies 2018 will seek to put key Jewish Studies questions in dialogue with broader intellectual concerns of different academic disciplines. What do varying understandings of what it means to be Jewish tell us about contemporary constructions of what it means to be a human being and a fellow citizen? In what ways does research into Jewish diasporas contribute to debates about transnationalism? How does the diversity of Jewish communities’ sociality, religion and culture reflect the social diversity of their localities? The conference will explore how Jewish Studies can both engage with existing intellectual agendas of the humanities and social sciences and provide a model for inquiry that goes beyond disciplinary boundaries. We welcome papers that explore Jewish traditions in different parts of the world and in different historical periods. Topics examined in the conference can include, but won’t be limited to the following:

  • Diversity in Jewish histories and cultures
  • Israel and Diaspora
  • Jewish Studies at the intersection with critical race studies and gender theory
  • Judaism, religion and secularism
  • Jewishness, arts and literature
  • Jewish Studies, colonialism, and postcolonialism

As usual with BAJS conferences, papers on topics unrelated to the conference theme are also welcome, including proposals by graduate students wishing to present on their doctoral research.

Confirmed keynote speakers and preliminary titles:

  • Professor Bryan Cheyette (Reading) The Ghetto as Travelling Concept
  • Professor Martin Goodman (Oxford) The History of Judaism and the History of Religions
  • Professor Susannah Heschel (Dartmouth) Theorizing Jewish Studies: Race, Gender and Empire
  • Professor Fania Oz-Salzberger (Paideia) Truth, Story, and History: Jewish Studies Across Disciplines

Paper proposals should include an abstract of no more than 300 words and a speaker biography of 100 words max.

Panel proposals should include a rationale for the panel of no more than 500 words, abstracts of 300 words max for each paper proposed as part of the panel and speaker biographies of no more than 100 words.

Speakers are allocated 30min for their presentation and questions. Usually papers are c.20min in length, allowing for 10min of questions and discussion.

We have a limited number of bursaries available for postgraduate students and early career researchers. If you would like to be considered, please state this in your proposal and send your CV.

Please send paper and panel proposals and all conference-related correspondence to BAJS.2018@dur.ac.uk

Conference booking will open early in March and delegates will be asked to register by 15 April 2018.