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Oxford Summer Institute on Modern and Contemporary Judaism, 3 July – 10 July 2017

‘Modern Judaism, Technology, and Authority: Historical, Social Scientific and Theological Perspectives’

Call for applications

The Oxford Summer Institute on Modern and Contemporary Judaism (OSI-MCJ) is an advanced academic seminar that is intended to raise innovative and challenging perspectives that have the potential to influence broader thinking about contemporary Judaism. A combination of outstanding senior scholars of Jewish religion and culture from around the globe join with a select group of early career European Jewish Studies scholars for eight days of rigorous study and intellectual exchange.

The fourth annual OSI-MCJ will address: ‘Modern Judaism, Technology, and Authority: Historical, Social Scientific and Theological Perspectives.’

This seminar will be dedicated to exploring the multiple ways in which modern and contemporary Jewish life, thought, and practice have responded to a broad range of innovations. The multi- and inter-disciplinary approach of the seminar is designed to bring into conversation distinctive fields of study and attract a diverse range of specialists.

Oxford Summer Institutes involve a period of intense study in the setting of an advanced seminar. To join a core group of twelve senior scholars of Jewish religion and culture, the Centre now invites applications from a further eight European scholars in the field at an early stage in their career (i.e. scholars who are about to complete a doctorate or have completed a doctorate since December 2012).

Up to eight European scholars will be selected to join the 2017 OSI. The Centre will cover travel and accommodation costs.

The closing date for completed applications is: 3 February 2017

For further information:

http://www.ochjs.ac.uk/academic-activities/oxford-summer-institute-2017/

Application Information:

http://www.ochjs.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/OSI-Application-info-.pdf

Application Form:

http://www.ochjs.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/OSI-Application-form.pdf

 

 

 

Archival Fellowship, University of Manchester

The Centre for Jewish Studies is seeking to fund a short-term project to generate a Guide to the Marmorstein Collection, held at the University of Manchester. This would focus upon its relevance for the history of Wissenschaft des Judentums and of the Jewish Book in Eastern Europe, and would be designed to facilitate future scholarly research. Payment: A consultancy fee of £3500 for 4-6 weeks. Period in which the work must be completed: Anytime in the period 1 March 2017 – 31 Aug 2017.

Deadline for application: 16 January 2017.

Further information: www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/cjs-archival-fellowship/

 

 Clinton Silver Visiting Fellowship in Jewish Eastern European History and/or Migration 
The Parkes Institute for Jewish/ non-Jewish Relations at the University of Southampton is delighted to announce a new one-month Visiting Fellowship in Jewish Eastern-European History and/or Migration.  We welcome applications from scholars at any stage of their career working on topics related to Jewish Eastern European History and/or Jewish migration. Scholars should have completed their PhD and be affiliated to a non-UK institution.
The fellowship will be for a minimum of one month and carries a bursary of up to £2,500 to cover travel, accommodation and living expenses. The Parkes Institute will provide access to the Parkes Library and Special Collections, as well as to a working space and university facilities. We can also provide support for visa applications where needed.  The fellow will be based in Southampton and is expected to attend Parkes events (such as the evening seminar and doctoral seminar) and to participate in the intellectual life of the Institute. The fellow is also expected to deliver a seminar and to organise a workshop for students.
The fellowship should be taken up between 15 April and 30 June 2017.
Please send a CV and a short statement (500 words) presenting your research project and how you will use the fellowship to Dr Claire Le Foll (c.le-foll@soton.ac.uk) by 31 December 2016.

Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme
BMBF – Studienstiftung – Leo Baeck Institute London

Aim of the Programme
The international Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme awards fellowships to doctoral students who carry out research into the history and culture of Central European Jewry. We welcome projects on any period or field (including literature, philosophy, history, musicology), and any region (such as Europe, Israel, the Americas), as long as they relate to German-speaking Jewry. In addition to financial support for one year, the programme offers an opportunity to exchange ideas and to network. It is open to doctoral candidates of any nationality, studying at any university. All fellows remain at their home institution, but get together for two workshops which are jointly organised by the Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes and the Leo Baeck Institute London.

Requirements
– University degree(s) with outstanding marks
– Date of latest degree not before February 2014
– Formal qualification for doctoral studies
– Research project focussing on the history and culture of Central European Jewry

Programme schedule
Up to twelve fellows will be selected for the programme in the academic year 2017/18. The fellowships run from October 2017 to September 2018. Regular workshops and a common intranet will support scholarship holders in presenting their research and discussing methodologies and findings with other fellows. Working languages are German and English. After the first year, students enrolled at a university in Germany may apply for an extension, provided that the Studienstiftung has funding available.

Funding
Fellows receive a stipend of 1,350 EUR per month, generally supplemented by a monthly research allowance of 100 EUR. For research trips and conference participation monthly supplements and travel allowances are available on application. Tuition fees are not covered.

Application
Candidates are invited to submit the following documents in English or German:
– Application form (download from the website)
– Cover letter outlining the motivation for participation in the programme (1 page)
– Curriculum vitae with details on education, general interests and language skills
– Photocopy of university degree(s), including marks/grading
– Research proposal (5 pages)
– Research schedule for the academic year 2017/18, including planned research trips
– Letter of recommendation by the supervisor of the PhD project
– Second letter of recommendation

The deadline for application is the 1st February 2017.

We accept applications by e-mail (as a single pdf document please, including the letters of recommendation) or conventional mail. Only complete application sets will be considered. Shortlisted candidates will be invited to an interview in Frankfurt in May 2017.

Contact : Dr Matthias Frenz

Telephone +49 228 82096-283

leobaeck@studienstiftung.de

Secretary: Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes

Christine Schade,  Ahrstraße 41,  53175 Bonn, Germany

Telephone +49 228 82096-281

schade@studienstiftung.de

Clemens N. Nathan PhD Scholarship in Modern Jewish History and Culture

The Centre for German-Jewish Studies at the University of Sussex is pleased to offer a 3-year Clemens N. Nathan PhD Scholarship for an outstanding doctoral candidate wishing to pursue a research project in the field of modern Jewish history and culture. Highly motivated current and prospective graduates with an outstanding academic record and a strong interest in the relevant topics are encouraged to apply. While diverse fields of investigation are currently open, we encourage projects in the following areas:

  • History and memory, with special emphasis on the second and third generation
  • Jewish identities and the question of integration
  • Diaspora, migration and transnational history
  • Human rights and the refugee question
  • Israel studies
  • Holocaust studies
  • Holocaust education

Founded over 20 years ago, the Centre for German-Jewish Studies at the University of Sussex is one of a few research institutions devoted to the interdisciplinary study of the history and culture of Jews in German-speaking lands since the Enlightenment. Given its location, a key objective of the Centre is to research the history of emigration of German-speaking Jews to other cultural contexts and the appreciation of the German-Jewish legacy worldwide. Pride in his German-Jewish heritage prompted Clemens N. Nathan to become involved in the work of the Centre for German-Jewish Studies. A committed supporter of the Centre and one of the founding members of its London-based Support Group, he died in June 2015.

Over the years the Centre for German-Jewish Studies has attracted the deposit of various collections that reflect the study of political, cultural, economic, academic and everyday life of Jewish refugees and their families to the United Kingdom. This testimony to life histories of German-Jewish families in turbulent times exemplifies both the attempted synthesis of Jewish and German cultures in German-speaking countries and the acculturation of German-Jewish refugees in Britain. The Centre archive is hosted at The Keep http://www.thekeep.info/german-jewish-collections/ and would make an excellent source base for a PhD research project.

The successful candidate will be expected to participate in the manifold research activities of the Centre which include lectures, international conferences, a Summer School for PhD students amongst other events.

Type of award

Postgraduate Research scholarship

Award amount

3 years PhD funding covering UK/EU fees (overseas students to pay the difference in fees) plus a stipend to cover living expenses (£14,057 p.a. for 2016/17).

Eligibility

Hold a Master’s degree upon start of the PhD programme

Application procedure

The recipient of this scholarship will be enrolled in the doctoral programme in the School of History, Art History and Philosophy at the University of Sussex. All applications should be submitted through the Sussex University postgraduate website. Please indicate on your application that you wish to be considered for the Clemens N. Nathan PhD Scholarship. Further information on application procedures can be found at: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/pg/applying/2016entry

Please include the following in your application:

  • Research proposal (2,500 words). Guidelines on what to include in a research proposal are available on the History department webpages – http://www.sussex.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/researchproposal
  • CV
  • A statement of purpose and motivation (500 words)
  • A copy of your MA diploma
  • Two letters of recommendation

Time schedule

Application deadline: 31 January 2017. Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed in February 2017.

Please contact Dr Gideon Reuveni (g.reuveni@sussex.co.uk) with any queries.

 

 

 

 Call for Applications

 Max and Hilde Kochmann Summer School

for PhD Students in European-Jewish History and Culture

 Dates: July 2-5, 2017 at the University of Sussex (Brighton, UK)

Deadline: January 5, 2017

The Centre for German-Jewish Studies at the University of Sussex (www.sussex.ac.uk/cgjs) in cooperation with the Martin Buber Chair in Jewish Thought and Philosophy at the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main (http://www.evtheol.uni-frankfurt.de/buber/index.html) invite PhD students to apply for the biennial Max and Hilde Kochmann Summer School for PhD Students in European-Jewish History and Culture 2017.

The Summer School brings together young researchers who are currently working on topics in Jewish history and culture (e.g. on Jewish religion and inner life, literature, art, economy, ideological and social movements, inter-religious and inter-cultural relations as well as family and everyday life) giving them the opportunity to present and discuss their projects in an informal and friendly atmosphere with leading scholars in the field. In doing so, the Summer School continues the efforts of previous events creating an interdisciplinary network of younger scholars engaged in areas of European-Jewish studies, thought and culture from the early to modern periods.

Candidates are invited to send via email a 3-5-page proposal outlining their PhD project, a short CV and one reference from their supervisor or relevant scholar in the field to Dr. Kim Wünschmann:

K.Wuenschmann@sussex.ac.uk

For other information regarding the summer school please contact: Dr. Gideon Reuveni (g.reuveni@sussex.ac.uk),

Dr. Kim Wünschmann (K.Wuenschmann@sussex.ac.uk) or Prof. Christian Wiese (c.wiese@em.uni-frankfurt.de).

The Centre for German-Jewish Studies will pay the travel and accommodation expenses of accepted candidates. Students from Central and Eastern Europe are particularly encouraged to apply. Candidates from non-European countries will be considered, but may be asked to contribute towards their flight costs.

Deadline for applications: January 5, 2017

Successful candidates will be notified at the beginning of March 2017.

Oxford Seminar in Advanced Jewish Studies

 Greek expanded, Greek transformed: The Vocabulary of the Septuagint and the Cultural World of the Translators

 January to June 2018

 Project leaders:  

Jan Joosten (Oriental Studies, University of Oxford)

Philomen Probert (Classics and Linguistics, University of Oxford)

 Core members:        

Eberhard Bons (Faculté de théologie catholique, Université de Strasbourg)

Trevor Evans (Ancient History, Macquarie University)

Gary Anderson (Theology, University of Notre Dame)

 

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS FOR FELLOWSHIPS

CLOSING DATE: 16 DECEMBER 2016

The Seminar will bring together an international team of scholars from different disciplines to work on the religious and political vocabulary of the Septuagint, combining the expertise of the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, where it will be based, with the resources of the Oxford Classics Faculty and the Faculty of Linguistics, Philology and Phonetics. The project will illuminate for biblical scholars the cultural world of those who produced and read the books of the Septuagint, and will illuminate for classical scholars the ways in which Jews of the Greek world adapted to the dominant culture and influenced it in turn.

With the conquests of Alexander the Great the Greek language came to be widely used by people outside Greece, and from multiple cultural traditions. As the earliest translation into Greek of a major body of existing literature, the Septuagint provides a crucial example of the impact this process had on the Greek language itself.

Many of the Greek words and constructions used in the Septuagint have a rich history in classical literature, while others have a background in documentary sources such as papyri and inscriptions. The Seminar will examine how the functions of these resources were expanded to meet the demands of a new culture. The project will examine how the dialectic in the Septuagint between biblical and Hellenistic connotations lends to words a semantic complexity that is both hard and rewarding to analyse.

Weekly interdisciplinary seminars, and a series of workshops will bring specialists in the Septuagint together with classicists, linguists, historians, and historians of religion. Septuagint vocabulary will be examined along with the Hellenistic cultural background and the methodological problems relating to that background.

Weekly seminars will be convened through the duration of two Oxford terms: 14 January to 10 March 2018 and 22 April to 16 June 2018. These will offer a forum for the Fellows to address central research topics related to the overall theme of the Seminar. The concluding conference will be held from 25 to 27 June 2018.

Visiting Fellows will receive an allowance of £2,515 (pro rata) per calendar month for the period of their tenure. Travelling expenses up to £550 pounds sterling will also be provided, and Fellows will be provided with a college association during their time at Oxford. Applicants should indicate the specific research they would undertake in the course of Fellowship and how this research would contribute to the broader work of the project. Applications by senior scholars, and by scholars at postdoctoral and advanced doctoral level, are welcome.

Closing date for applications: 16 December 2016

 For more detailed information see:
http://www.ochjs.ac.uk/academics/visiting-academics/visiting-fellows/

 or contact:

Prof Jan Joosten (jan.joosten@orinst.ox.ac.uk)

Prof Philomen Probert (philomen.probert@classics.ox.ac.uk)

For any other queries contact:

Martine Smith-Huvers (registrar@ochjs.ac.uk)

 

 

The Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Manchester is seeking to fund a short-term project to generate a guide to the Anglo-Jewish holdings on the Arab-Israeli conflict, which are scattered throughout the University’s archives, for the facilitation of future scholarly research. The expectation would be that the successful candidate would be based in Manchester for the research period of 4-6 weeks. The precise methodology and scope of the project would be agreed with the Centre’s directors.

Collections that would be surveyed include the massive Guardian Archive, which documents through dispatches and published articles the history of the Second World War, the founding of Israel and the later Middle East conflicts, and which includes important correspondence with Chaim Weizmann; the papers of Samuel Alexander (1859-1938), a supporter of the campaign for a Jewish homeland in Palestine; the W.P. Crozier Papers which incorporate interviews with Weizmann and other statesmen over the issue of the Jewish National Home; the Military Papers of Major-General Eric Edward Dorman O’Gowan, which include material relating to the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the Dame Mabel Tylecote Printed Collection, which contains printed material relating to the Anglo-Israel Association, the foundation of Israel and the Middle East conflict.

The Centre acts as a focus for Jewish Studies at the University of Manchester and also as the hub for the Northern UK Jewish Studies Partnership. The proposed project is one of a number of activities intended to facilitate the research use of University of Manchester Library archival holdings, sponsored by the Centre for Jewish Studies, alongside similar projects under the auspices of the John Rylands Research Institute and other research-related bodies.

Further particulars. Payment: A consultancy fee of £3500 for 4-6 weeks. Period in which the work must be completed: Anytime in the period 1 Dec 2016 – 31 Aug 2017. Application: Please send a cover letter outlining your suitability for such a project and a CV, detailing relevant PhD or equivalent experience/qualifications, to cjs@manchester.ac.uk. The expectation is that the successful candidate will be notified by mid November 2016. Deadline for application: 31 Oct 2016.

John Rylands Research Institute call for applications –  Application to the Newberry/Rylands Joint Fellowship 2017/2018 is now open.

The Newberry Library-John Rylands Institute Exchange Fellowship provides two months of support for a scholar to be in residence for one month at the Newberry Library in Chicago and an additional month in residence at the John Rylands Library in Manchester, England.

To find out more on how to apply for this exciting opportunity please go to: http://www.jrri.manchester.ac.uk/research/funding/

The Woolf Institute (Cambridge) is delighted to announce that applications are now being accepted for the e-learning course, Jews, Christians and Muslims in Europe: Modern Challenges

This timely e-learning course focuses on the relationships between Jews, Christians and Muslims in modern Europe. The course is multidisciplinary and examines historical trends, religious and cultural interaction, and issues of contemporary citizenship.

The course will be led and co-taught by Dr Gorazd Andrejč , Dr Sami Everett, and  Dr Esther-Miriam Wagner. For more information on the topics covered, the structure of the course, and the application details, please see here.

The e-learning approach allows participants to study wherever and whenever they choose via the internet. Many participants from across Europe and around the world – Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Poland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, as well as Australia, China, Kenya, Indonesia, Japan, New Zealand, and the United States – have already taken this course. 

To get a feel for the course from the students’ perspective, please find reflections on the course by two former students who completed the course here and here.

The closing date for applications is 2 August 2016. The course commences, with Induction Week, on Monday 5 September 2016. The application form is available to download here. The course fee is £350. A limited number of bursaries are available.

If you have any queries about the course, contact Dr Emma Harris, Academic Coordinator, at eth22@cam.ac.uk.

Jews, Christians and Muslims in Europe Modern Challenges 2016.jpg

50 fully-funded PhD studentships are available for 2016-17 entry. You should identify a potential supervisor, register (online) for your PhD programme by 29 April 2016, and then submit (online) the Funding Declaration form by 29 April 2016.

Information on current Jewish Studies PhD projects and their supervisors can be found at:

www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/current-students/

Further information on this studentship scheme and access to the forms can be found at:

www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/fees/postgraduate-research-funding/#pgrstudentships

2016-IIJG-CFRP-announcement.jpg

This is a home/EU fees bursary for MA students who make Jewish Studies topics their main study focus in their MA in Religions and Theology (www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/subjects/religionstheology/postgraduatetaught/). Three bursaries will be awarded on a competitive basis. There are no eligibility criteria based on nationality, but please note that the bursary is restricted to the maximum cost of home/EU fees. APPLICATION DEADLINE EXTENDED to 3 May 2016. Further information: www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/ma-funding-opportunities/

The Oxford Biblical Hebrew Summer School will take place at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies in the Clarendon Institute Building in Oxford from September 5-16, 2016.

The school offers ten days of intensive teaching in biblical Hebrew. Each weekday there will be 3 hours of teaching, delivered in two separate 90-minute sessions, between 10:00 and 16:00.

The course corresponds to a term of intensive teaching for a full-time university student. It is open to students with or without experience of the language. The course is very demanding and the instructors will expect students to spend at least 4 hours per day in private study.

Applications should be submitted by Sunday May 29, 2016. Places are limited.

Application Form
Please include in your application contact information for one academic referee.

The cost of the school is £290 per student for 30 hours of language instruction. This does not include any textbooks/workbooks, which the student will be expected to acquire for him/herself. The school is non-residential and there is no teaching at the weekends.

Successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date.

This is a home/EU fees bursary for MA students who make Jewish Studies topics their main study focus in their MA in Religions and Theology (www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/subjects/religionstheology/postgraduatetaught/). Three bursaries will be awarded on a competitive basis. There are no eligibility criteria based on nationality, but please note that the bursary is restricted to the maximum cost of home/EU fees. Further information: www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/ma-funding-opportunities/

The Woolf Institute, which specializes in the study of relations between Jews, Christians and Muslims from a multidisciplinary perspective, invites applications for its annual visiting fellowship.

The Fellowship is tenable for a one to two month period that overlaps one of the Cambridge terms 2017:

Lent term: 17 January – 17 March 2017

Easter term: 25 April – 16 June 2017

The successful candidate will be expected to be involved in a project of academic research or public education in an area relevant to the Institute’s work. The Fellow will be asked to present their work at a symposium on the subject of their project proposal.

There is no stipend attached to the Fellowships, but Fellows will be entitled to free accommodation in Cambridge and one round-trip journey to Cambridge. They will also have access to the Woolf Institute and Cambridge University libraries.

The Fellowship is available for a postdoctoral scholar of any academic rank, a policymaker or analyst in a relevant area of work and will most likely be asked to participate in some of the Institute’s teaching or practice-based activities. Further information about the Institute can be found at: http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk.

A letter of application, CV, the names of two referees who may be approached, a project proposal (1,500 words max.), and a sample of work should be sent to:

Electors of the Visiting Fellowship, Woolf Institute, 12-14 Grange Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DU, UK or e-mailed to Tina Steiner at bs411@cam.ac.uk.

Questions may be addressed informally to the Deputy Director, Dr Shana Cohen at sc736@cam.ac.uk.

Deadline for the submission of applications is 19 February 2016.

Call for proposals in Jewish and Hebrew Studies:  The John Rylands Research Institute is pleased to announce that it intends to sponsor Leverhulme Early Career Fellowships beginning in 2016. Projects must demonstrate a strong connection to the University of Manchester Library’s Special Collections, which include extensive Judaica and Hebraica holdings (www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/judaica-collection/) and many other collections relevant to Jewish and Hebrew Studies. Potential applicants are invited to submit preliminary applications by Mon 11 January 2016. An internal panel will then decide which applications to put forward to the Leverhulme (by 10 March 2016). For further information, see www.manchesterjewishstudies.org/leverhulme-fellowships/

Aim of the Programme

Fellowships of the international Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme are awarded to doctoral students who pursue their research in the field of history and culture of German-speaking Jewry. Besides financial support for one year, the programme offers regular workshops, jointly organised by the Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes and the Leo Baeck Institute London. The programme particularly aims at doctoral students who wish to carry out research in more than one country; it is open to students of any nationality at any institution of higher education.

Requirements

  • University degree(s) with excellent marks
  • Date of latest degree not before February 2013
  • Formal qualification for doctoral studies
  • Doctoral research project focussing on the history and culture of German speaking Jewry

Programme schedule

For the academic year 2016/17 up to twelve fellows will be selected for the programme. The fellowships are awarded for the period October 2016 to September 2017. Regular workshops and a common intranet encourage scholarship holders to present their research and discuss their methodology and findings with other fellows. Working languages are German and English. Students enrolled at a university in Germany may apply for an extension after the first year, if the Studienstiftung is able to provide the funding.

Funding

Fellows receive a stipend of 1,150 EUR per month, generally supplemented by a monthly research allowance of 100 EUR. For research trips and conference participation monthly supplements and travel allowances are available on application. Tuition fees are not covered.

Application

Candidates are invited to submit the following documents in English or German:

  • Application form (download from the website)
  • Cover letter outlining the motivation for participation in the programme (1 page)
  • Curriculum vitae with details on education, general interests and language skills
  • Photocopy/-copies of university degree(s), including marks/grading
  • Research proposal (5 pages)
  • Research schedule for the academic year 2016/17, including planned research trips
  • Letter of recommendation by the supervisor of the PhD project
  • Second letter of recommendation

The deadline for application is the 1st February 2016.

We accept applications by e-mail (one pdf-document) or conventional mail. Only complete application sets will be considered. Short listed candidates will be invited for an interview in Frankfurt in May 2016.

Contact

Dr Matthias Frenz
Telephone +49 228 82096-283
leobaeck@studienstiftung.de

Secretary

Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes
Christine Schade
Ahrstraße 41
53175 Bonn
Germany
Telephone +49 228 82096-281
schade@studienstiftung.de

  • Are you applying to the University of Cambridge to begin doctoral studies in the academic year 2016-17?
  • Will your research be focused on aspects of the relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims?
  • Does your discipline fall within Arts, Humanities, or Social Sciences?

APPLY NOW for the Woolf Institute Cambridge Scholarship. In collaboration with the Cambridge Commonwealth, European and International Trust, the Woolf Institute will support outstanding research students at the University of Cambridge. 

Visit the Woolf Institute’s website for full details including FAQs and how to apply.

ENSURE THAT YOU ARE ELIGIBLE TO APPLY BY VISITING THE TRUSTS WEBSITE AT http://www.cambridgetrusts.org/scholarships/

If you have any queries, do not hesitate to contact Dr Emma Harris at eth22@cam.ac.uk.

Woolf Institute Cambridge Scholarships – applications for entry 2016-17 now open

The Woolf Institute in Cambridge, UK, has been dedicated to the provision of graduate and postgraduate study for more than 15 years. In partnership with the Cambridge Commonwealth, European and International Trust, the Woolf Institute established the Woolf Institute Cambridge Scholarships. These scholarships are intended to support outstanding research students at the University of Cambridge who have the potential to become exceptional leaders of the future. 

Scholars will be selected from amongst applicants in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. Their research must be relevant to the focus of the Woolf Institute – the multi-disciplinary study of relations between Jews, Christians and Muslims. 

Read the blog post written by our first scholarship awardee, Rodrigo, as he reflects on his first year on the doctoral programme at Cambridge: https://woolfinstitute.wordpress.com/2015/06/29/my-phd-journey-year-1/.

The Woolf Institute and the Cambridge Commonwealth, European and International Trust will co-fund the successful candidates. Each scholarship will cover the full cost of studying for a PhD at the University of Cambridge, and will be tenable at any of the thirty-one Cambridge Colleges. 

The application process is now live and applicants for 2016-17 entry are required to apply to the University of Cambridge by the published scholarship application deadline (2 December 2015) [http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/]. Applicants must show evidence of excellence in their field of study and formulate a coherent research proposal. Applicants are encouraged to contact the Woolf Institute prior to submitting their application to discuss whether their research proposal is relevant to the Institute’s focus.

For further information:

Woolf Institute (http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/): Dr Emma Harris at eth22@cam.ac.uk

Cambridge Trust (http://www.cambridgetrust.org/): cambridge.trust@admin.cam.ac.uk

The Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies (www.ochjs.ac.uk) is pleased to be able to offer postdoctoral visiting fellowships to one or two junior scholars to join the Oxford Seminar in Advanced Jewish Studies on ‘Israel in Egypt’ in January to June 2016. Applicants, who should be about to complete a doctorate or have completed a doctorate since December 2012, should send curricula vitae, research proposals relating to the Seminar and two academic references to Martine Smith-Huvers (registrar@ochjs.ac.uk) by 1 December 2015, stating whether the application is for January to March or April to June 2016.

Israel in Egypt/Egypt in Israel:

An investigation of the land of Egypt as concept and reality for Jews in Antiquity and the early medieval period.

  • Project leaders:  Prof Alison Salvesen (University of Oxford)
  • Prof Sarah Pearce (University of Southampton)
  • Dr Miriam Frenkel (Hebrew University, Jerusalem)

The ‘Israel in Egypt’ project addresses a number of questions about identity and belonging among Egyptian Jews over the course of one and a half millennia.

For Jews in ancient and medieval Palestine and the Diaspora, the land of Egypt was a real place and also an abstract notion shaped by scriptural texts. The nation-defining episode of the Exodus of the Israelites, the unequivocal injunction in the Torah not to return to Egypt (Deut 17:16) and the negative attitude of biblical writers in general towards Egypt, existed in tension with the fact of Jewish residence there. Jewish settlements in Egypt ranged from the time of Jeremiah, to the Jewish military garrison in Elephantine during the Persian period, to major settlements and above all the huge urban community in Alexandria under the Ptolemies and Romans. Though all these disappear in the second century following the revolt of 115–17 CE and the extermination of the Jews of Egypt under Trajan, the presence of Jews is attested again in the fifth century by patristic writers, and then through Byzantine and Islamic rule into the medieval period, principally by the documents preserved in the Cairo Geniza.

Key sources for Jewish life in Egypt include the Aramaic Elephantine documents and a large corpus of Greek papyri written about or by Jews, the Zenon papyri, Jewish inscriptions from Leontopolis, Demerdash and other sites, the wide range of Hellenistic Jewish literature including the bulk of the LXX, the works of Philo of Alexandria, and the writings of Flavius Josephus. For the early Islamic period there are many papyri bearing indirect testimony to Jewish life in Egypt, and for the medieval period there is the vast collection of documents produced by Jews and preserved for centuries in the Cairo Geniza.

Weekly seminars will be convened through the duration of two Oxford terms, 17th January to 12th March, and 24th April to 18th June 2016. These will offer a forum for the Fellows of the project to address central research topics related to the overall theme of the seminar. The findings of the Research Project will be presented at a concluding conference on 20th and 21st June 2016.

The Postdoctoral Visiting Fellows, who must be resident in Oxford during the term, will each receive a stipend of £2,500 per calendar month (pro rata) for the period of tenure and travelling expenses up to £500.

Closing date for applications: 1 December 2015. Notification of outcome: by mid-December 2015.

For more detailed information, contact:

Professor Alison Salvesen alison.salvesen@orinst.ox.ac.uk

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee is pleased to present its Fellowship program. Two or three fellowships will be awarded each year to deserving scholars engaged in graduate level, post-doctoral, or independent study to conduct research in the JDC Archives, either in New York or Jerusalem. Research topics in the fields of twentieth century Jewish history, general history, and humanitarian assistance will be considered, as well as other areas of academic research covered in the JDC archival collections. The amount granted will range from $2,000 to $5,000 and the deadline is January 15, 2016.

Read more and apply: archives.jdc.org/about-us/fellowships.html

Short-term fellowships at the John Rylands Library, University of Manchester. The John Rylands Research Institute is pleased to announce its latest call for Visiting Research Fellowships. The Library’s Special Collections include highly significant collections of Judaica and Hebraica. The Institute welcomes applications for these Fellowships, which offer financial support up to a maximum of £1500 per month for three months to cover travel and living expenses. The closing date is Fri 27 Nov 2015 and further details of how to apply, including application form, can be found at www.jrri.manchester.ac.uk/opportunities/visiting-research-fellowships/

Applications for entry 2016-17 are now open for the Woolf Institute Cambridge Scholarships.

A partnership between the Woolf Institute and the Cambridge Commonwealth, European and International Trust, these scholarships are intended to support outstanding research students at the University of Cambridge who have the potential to become exceptional leaders of the future. Scholars will be selected from amongst applicants in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. Their research must be relevant to the focus of the Woolf Institute – the multi-disciplinary study of relations between Jews, Christians and Muslims.

Woolf Institute Cambridge Scholarships 2016The Woolf Institute and the Cambridge Commonwealth, European and International Trust will co-fund the successful candidates. Each scholarship will cover the full cost of studying for a PhD at the University of Cambridge, and will be tenable at any of the 31 Cambridge Colleges.

Applicants for 2016-17 entry are required to apply to the University of Cambridge by 2 December 2015. Applicants must show evidence of excellence in their field of study and formulate a coherent research proposal.

Applicants are encouraged to contact the Woolf Institute prior to submitting their application to discuss whether their research proposal is relevant to the Institute’s focus.

Click here to read the first awardee’s reflections of his first year on the doctoral programme at the University of Cambridge.

Deadline details and application:

www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk

Scholarship information:

www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/phd.asp

www.cambridgetrust.org

Contact:

Dr Emma Harris, Academic Coordinator, Woolf Institute: eth22@cam.ac.uk

Cambridge Commonwealth, European and International Trust: cambridge.trust@admin.cam.ac.uk

Call for applications for Fellowships

Closing date: 1 October 2015

Project Leaders: Abigail Green (Brasenose College, Oxford) and
Simon Levis Sullam (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice)

The Seminar examines the place of Jews in the liberal political culture of Europe and the United States of America from the first period of emancipation to the birth of the State of Israel and the postwar struggles for human rights in which Jewish activists played a prominent role. In particular, the Seminar will explore the tension between the key role of Jews in constituting liberal political culture in a wide variety of contexts, and the limits and constraints imposed on Jewish political activity by the rise of modern Anti-Semitism, including their tragic climax in the Holocaust seen especially through Jewish reactions to persecutions.

This broad focus will enable us to illuminate three key issues: (1) the scale and significance of Jewish engagement in liberal political culture, including parliamentary and municipal politics, the press, the public sphere, salons and associational life, intellectual and political circles. (2) the politics of Jewish assimilation and dissimilation that was central to liberal political culture, including efforts and projects of nationalisation, integration and empire, and of secularism, religious reform, and conversion, as well as attempts at the re-interpretation of Jewish identity in the private and public sphere. (3) all forms of hostility, prejudice, stereotype or organized anti-Jewish activity that gave rise to and shaped the ‘Jewish question’, especially insofar as they affected the role and action of Jews in the sphere of liberal politics.

These three issues will be examined through different local, national, and international case-studies, and through an engagement with prominent individuals such as Rahel Varnhagen, Johann Jacoby, Adolphe Crémieux, Fanny Lewald, Benjamin Disraeli, the Reinach brothers, Theodor Herzl, Rudolf Mosse, Luigi Luzzatti, Raphael Lemkin, Hannah Arendt, and Isaiah Berlin. The seminar consequently intertwines analysis of collective and individual experiences and practices, working closely on sources not only at the level of the history of ideas and culture, but also by deploying new approaches from gender studies and the history of emotions.

In particular, the Seminar will provide an opportunity to integrate established historiographical concerns like liberalism, emancipation, Anti-Semitism that have traditionally been studied in national and local contexts, with the new perspectives opened-up by trans-national history and the imperial turn. The Seminar therefore looks beyond national frameworks, emphasising the unique quality of specific local milieux (including Oxford itself), the role of Jews in translating and exporting liberal ideas and practices between different contexts and cultures, and the importance of transnational and, increasingly, trans-Atlantic liberal and Jewish networks in coordinating Jewish responses to anti-Jewish atrocities: from the Damascus and Mortara Affairs through the pogroms, to the humanitarian disasters on the Eastern Front during World War One and, eventually, the Holocaust.

Weekly seminars will be convened through the duration of two Oxford terms: 9 October to 3 December 2016, and 15 January to 11 March 2017. These will offer a forum for the fellows to address central research topics related to the overall theme of the Seminar. The concluding conference will be held on 13 and 14 March 2017.

Visiting Fellows will receive an allowance of £2,515 (pro rata) per calendar month for the period of their tenure. Travelling expenses up to £550 pounds sterling will also be provided, and Fellows will be provided with a college association during their time at Oxford. Applications by senior scholars, and by scholars at postdoctoral and advanced doctoral level, are welcome.

Closing date for applications:  1 October 2015

For more detailed information see: http://www.ochjs.ac.uk/academics/visiting-academics/visiting-fellows/

or contact: Dr. Abigail Green (abigail.green@bnc.ox.ac.uk); Dr. Simon Levis Sullam (levissmn@unive.it)

For any other queries contact: Martine Smith-Huvers (registrar@ochjs.ac.uk)

Call for applications for Fellowships

Closing date: 1 October 2015

Project Leaders: Abigail Green (Brasenose College, Oxford) and
Simon Levis Sullam (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice)

The Seminar examines the place of Jews in the liberal political culture of Europe and the United States of America from the first period of emancipation to the birth of the State of Israel and the postwar struggles for human rights in which Jewish activists played a prominent role. In particular, the Seminar will explore the tension between the key role of Jews in constituting liberal political culture in a wide variety of contexts, and the limits and constraints imposed on Jewish political activity by the rise of modern Anti-Semitism, including their tragic climax in the Holocaust seen especially through Jewish reactions to persecutions.

This broad focus will enable us to illuminate three key issues: (1) the scale and significance of Jewish engagement in liberal political culture, including parliamentary and municipal politics, the press, the public sphere, salons and associational life, intellectual and political circles. (2) the politics of Jewish assimilation and dissimilation that was central to liberal political culture, including efforts and projects of nationalisation, integration and empire, and of secularism, religious reform, and conversion, as well as attempts at the re-interpretation of Jewish identity in the private and public sphere. (3) all forms of hostility, prejudice, stereotype or organized anti-Jewish activity that gave rise to and shaped the ‘Jewish question’, especially insofar as they affected the role and action of Jews in the sphere of liberal politics.

These three issues will be examined through different local, national, and international case-studies, and through an engagement with prominent individuals such as Rahel Varnhagen, Johann Jacoby, Adolphe Crémieux, Fanny Lewald, Benjamin Disraeli, the Reinach brothers, Theodor Herzl, Rudolf Mosse, Luigi Luzzatti, Raphael Lemkin, Hannah Arendt, and Isaiah Berlin. The seminar consequently intertwines analysis of collective and individual experiences and practices, working closely on sources not only at the level of the history of ideas and culture, but also by deploying new approaches from gender studies and the history of emotions.

In particular, the Seminar will provide an opportunity to integrate established historiographical concerns like liberalism, emancipation, Anti-Semitism that have traditionally been studied in national and local contexts, with the new perspectives opened-up by trans-national history and the imperial turn. The Seminar therefore looks beyond national frameworks, emphasising the unique quality of specific local milieux (including Oxford itself), the role of Jews in translating and exporting liberal ideas and practices between different contexts and cultures, and the importance of transnational and, increasingly, trans-Atlantic liberal and Jewish networks in coordinating Jewish responses to anti-Jewish atrocities: from the Damascus and Mortara Affairs through the pogroms, to the humanitarian disasters on the Eastern Front during World War One and, eventually, the Holocaust.

Weekly seminars will be convened through the duration of two Oxford terms: 9 October to 3 December 2016, and 15 January to 11 March 2017. These will offer a forum for the fellows to address central research topics related to the overall theme of the Seminar. The concluding conference will be held on 13 and 14 March 2017.

Visiting Fellows will receive an allowance of £2,515 (pro rata) per calendar month for the period of their tenure. Travelling expenses up to £550 pounds sterling will also be provided, and Fellows will be provided with a college association during their time at Oxford. Applications by senior scholars, and by scholars at postdoctoral and advanced doctoral level, are welcome.

Closing date for applications:  1 October 2015

For more detailed information see: http://www.ochjs.ac.uk/academics/visiting-academics/visiting-fellows/

or contact: Dr. Abigail Green (abigail.green@bnc.ox.ac.uk); Dr. Simon Levis Sullam (levissmn@unive.it)

For any other queries contact: Martine Smith-Huvers (registrar@ochjs.ac.uk)

The British Association for Jewish Studies seeks to establish a BAJS studentship for a postgraduate researcher to support the activities of the Association. The studentship will be £1500 for one year. The awardee must be a registered PhD student but can be based at any university in the UK and Ireland. The studentship holder will be responsible to the Secretary and Officers of the Committee.

Proposed start date: 1st September 2015 and end date: 31st August 2016

Closing Date for Applications: 15th May 2015

Interview Date: 6th or 7th July at the annual BAJS conference in Manchester

Studentship Purpose

  1. To contribute to the administrative organisation and activities of the British Association for Jewish Studies, with specific projects determined by the Committee.
  2. To provide valuable academic administrative experience, career development and networking opportunities for a PhD student in the field of Jewish Studies.

The British Association for Jewish Studies aims to nurture, cultivate and advance teaching and research in Jewish culture and history in all its aspects within Higher Education in the British Isles. This studentship would suit an applicant who is studying for a PhD in the field of Jewish Studies, and is considering the possibility of an academic career. The studentship holder will support the activities of the British Association for Jewish Studies through assisting the Committee Officers in the work of the Association. In the first instance, this will involve supporting expansion of the membership of the Association, and supporting maintenance and development of the BAJS database and website. The studentship will involve building effective working relationships with members of the Committee, academics and departments working in the field of Jewish Studies, liaison with schools and colleges, and other academic organisations with an interest in Jewish Studies. The ability to organise effectively and communicate to a diverse range of professionals is essential to this studentship.

Application requirements

1) Covering letter, including a statement addressing the following areas:

  1. The subject matter and contribution of your PhD in Jewish Studies.
  2. Evidence of your ability to organise and communicate effectively (e.g. committee work, society work, IT skills, etc).
  3. Any other reasons for your suitability for this studentship.

 2) Curriculum Vitae

3)  A letter of reference from your PhD supervisor, which can be sent directly to the Secretary of the BAJS committee.

All materials should reach Helen Spurling (h.spurling@southampton.ac.uk) by 15th May 2015.

The Parkes Institute is pleased to offer at least four studentships for students from any country to study for an MA in Jewish History and Culture at the University of Southampton, UK. The studentships will assist towards the cost of tuition fees (min. £1000 – max. £2500).

The University of Southampton is home to the Parkes Institute, one of the foremost centres for the study of Jewish history and culture in the UK, with specialists in ancient and modern Jewish history, literature, and culture, and the histories of British, German, South African, and East European Jewries. The Parkes Library and Archive is an outstanding resource for the study of Jewish history and culture.

First launched in 1997, the MA programme offers a rich encounter with the main currents in Jewish history and culture through the ages, drawing on and fostering the use of different scholarly disciplines. Reflecting the heritage of James Parkes’ scholarship, on which the Parkes Institute is founded, the programme places a distinct and unique emphasis on studying Jewish History and Culture within the broad framework of the study of Jewish/non-Jewish Relations.

Foundation-level training is provided in research skills, and opportunities for specialisation are offered through a choice of optional modules. Students are also encouraged to develop or employ language skills for research purposes.

The programme attracts students from a very varied range of backgrounds and academic interests. For some of these students, the MA provides the foundation for doctoral studies, but for others the course offers opportunities for professional and personal development in fields such as teaching, community relations, museum and archive work.

Deadline: 31 May 2015

How to apply:
See our website http://www.soton.ac.uk/parkes/postgrad/ma1.html for information about the programme and details on how to apply. Please apply online for the MA programme at http://www.soton.ac.uk/postgraduate/pgstudy/howdoiapplypg.html and send a personal statement regarding this studentship to Dr Shirli Gilbert, convenor of the MA programme, at s.gilbert@soton.ac.uk.

Applications are invited for a fully-funded interdisciplinary PhD studentship as part of the Music and the Holocaust website project (http://holocaustmusic.ort.org).

The Music and the Holocaust website is a widely-used educational resource created under the auspices of the international organisation World ORT, and was featured at a United Nations presentation in 2014. The website includes hundreds of articles describing the wide range of musical activities that took place in camps and ghettos across Nazi-occupied Europe, focusing on the work of professional musicians and composers as well as music created and performed by millions of ‘ordinary’ people in response to their experiences of internment. It also contains dozens of recordings as well as resources for teachers, students, commemoration organisers, and members of the general public interested in the subject. One of the key goals of the project is to bring the material to a wide audience and encourage its use in teaching and commemorative activity.

The PhD student’s research will focus on any aspect of musical activity in Germany or its occupied territories during the period of Nazi rule between 1933 and 1945.

The student will also spend three hours per week overseeing the website, including soliciting new articles and music recordings, writing short articles for the site based on their own research, and working with the Parkes Institute’s Outreach Programme to integrate use of the website in secondary teaching.

The student’s principal supervisor will be Dr Shirli Gilbert, with a co-supervisor selected to suit the candidate’s particular research interests. Students will be registered at the University of Southampton.

You are strongly recommended to contact Dr Shirli Gilbert (s.gilbert@soton.ac.uk) to discuss your proposal in advance of submission.

The PhD studentship requires at least a good 2:1 honours degree (or equivalent) and a Masters in either History, Music, or a related discipline.

The PhD scholarship is tenable for a maximum of three years, commencing September 2015, at an annual stipend of around £15,000. Tuition fees will also be paid directly to the University at the appropriate UKEU fee rate.

Application for this studentship is by CV; a sample of written work (4,000 words, max); an 800 word personal statement; and a 1500 word research proposal. The research proposal should be in line with the topic outlined above. Please also arrange for two academic references to be sent independently by the deadline. All material should be sent to pgafh@soton.ac.uk.

Deadline for applications: Friday 24 April 2015.

We may invite you for interview over telephone or Skype (date tbc).

Bursary 2015-16 information

Applications are invited for this three-year fully funded PhD scholarship in the Department of Psychosocial Studies, Birkbeck, University of London, to begin in October 2015.  The scholarship is part of a wider project on Ethical Monotheism and is intended for a student who will explore the ethical formation of young people within monotheistic communities in a pluralistic urban setting. The project will respond to the emergent rhetoric pathologizing how minority religious traditions educate their younger members to negotiate the diversity of British society, making an important empirical contribution to the understanding of the ethical teachings of monotheistic religions in Britain.

Whilst the exact parameters of the study are open to discussion between the PhD student and her/his supervisors (one of whom will be Professor Stephen Frosh), it is expected that the student will carry out an empirical study with Christian, Muslim and / or Jewish congregations exploring institutionally supported educational activities geared towards younger members. The study will most likely utilise both ethnographic observation and interviews. The focus will be on developing an intensive understanding of the communication and negotiation of ethical and political values derived from the main monotheistic religions in the lives of these young people.

The student will have a background in a relevant discipline in the social sciences, such as psychosocial studies, social psychology, sociology or anthropology. An interest in psychosocial studies would be an advantage and a good knowledge of qualitative research methods is essential.

Please contact Professor Stephen Frosh (s.frosh@bbk.ac.uk) for an informal discussion and further information. To apply, please complete the Department’s PhD application form on http://www.bbk.ac.uk/psychosocial/prospective-students/phd. Please mark your application clearly ‘Dangoor Scholarship’.

In 2015 the Society will offer a limited number of travel grants (each valued at up to £500) to students of archaeology and related subjects who wish to excavate or undertake archaeological research in Israel.

The closing date for applications is Friday 27th February 2015

Please write to the Executive Secretary at:

Anglo-Israel Archaeological Society
2nd Floor, Supreme House, 300 Regents Park Road, London N3 2JX
for an application form or e-mail your request to: sheilarford1@sky.com

Grant Application Form – Reference Request Form

Forms may also be downloaded from the AIAS website: www.aias.org.uk

Job description

You will work within the framework of a project entitled Reconfiguring Diaspora. The Transformation of the Jewish Diaspora in Late Antiquity. The project has been funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (N.W.O.). The project’s director is Prof. dr. Leonard V. Rutgers. You will be based at Utrecht University. There you will be part of the Department of History and Art History, Section Ancient History and Classical Civilization.

The prime objective of the research project is to reconfigure the classical notion of Diaspora by studying the massive social and cultural changes that affected Jewish communities throughout the Mediterranean during the transitional period that saw the demise of the classical world and the rise of medieval society. This project places special emphasis on the phenomenon of linguistic change as it seeks to come to a new understanding of the larger social and cultural patterns at play in named process. Questions to be addressed include: why and how were the Jewish communities of the Diaspora marginalized, how did this affect their Diasporic self-consciousness, and what factors explain why intragroup relations in Europe have developed along the lines laid down during precisely this period?

Within the project, two PhD positions and one Postdoc position are available for the following projects:

  1. The Renaissance of Hebrew among the Jewish communities of the West (PhD)
  2. The Renaissance of Hebrew and Aramaic among the Jewish communities of the East (PhD)
  3. The Construction of Eretz Israel in Rabbinic Literature (postdoc)

The project has been structured in such a way that PhD and the postdoc candidates are expected to cooperate closely and intensively with one another and with the project leader. You must be willing to do some research travel and are also expected to participate in the organization of several international conferences and in the writing of occasional blogs for the project’s website.

For more information and application details see https://www.academictransfer.com/employer/UU/vacancy/26166/lang/en/