Fellowships for the Oxford Seminar in Advanced Jewish Studies, ‘Between Sacred and Profane – Jewish Musical  Cultures in Early Modern Europe’

OXFORD SEMINAR IN ADVANCED JEWISH STUDIES

 Between Sacred and Profane – Jewish Musical  Cultures in Early Modern Europe

 October 2019 to March 2020

 Project leader: Diana Matut (Heidelberg/Halle-Wittenberg)

 CALL FOR APPLICATIONS FOR FELLOWSHIPS

 CLOSING DATE: 12 OCTOBER 2018

 The Oxford Seminar in Advanced Jewish Studies for 2019-2020 will focus on Ashkenazic, Italian-Jewish and Western Sephardic musical expressions in Europe during the early modern period (excluding European Jewish communities under Ottoman rule).  Special emphasis will be given to the connection of liturgical, semi-liturgical and secular spheres within both composition and performance practice—hence the title “Between Sacred and Profane”.  A group of up to eight Visiting Fellows in each Oxford term will examine the connections between these three major Jewish cultural entities (especially in urban spaces where they were all part of a complex Jewish soundscape) and external connections with the European musical cultures in which this Jewish music developed.

The study of Jewish Music 1500-1750 has been fuelled in the course of the last decades by the discovery of the early modern period as one of the formative periods in Jewish history; by a shift of focus from a ‘high culture’ perspective to the history of everyday life and gender studies, including the vernaculars and their musical expressions; by the rediscovery of important materials relating to the music of the Sephardic and Italian Jewish communities in the West; by reconstructions of Jewish song culture and performance practice in Italy and Ashkenaz; by the discovery of secondary sources on Jewish Music in this period in the writings of Christian Hebraists and fragments in Christian compositions; and by analysis of concepts expressed by Jewish religious authorities with regard to music.  The group will build on this earlier work, examining in particular the manifestations of Jewish music which elude the categories found in Western musical traditions, such as synagogue music, prayer chants, various semi-liturgical songs and hymns and the traditions that would eventually evolve into klezmer, as well as the interdependence and processes of demarcation between sacred and profane in various European Jewish musical cultures throughout this period.

The group will be led by Diana Matut (Heidelberg/Halle-Wittenberg) and will include Ruth HaCohen (Hebrew University), Edwin Seroussi (Hebrew University) and Deborah Rooke (Oxford).

Applications for Visiting Fellowships are invited from scholars working in any of these fields related to Jewish music from 1500-1750.

Each week, one member of the group will present an aspect of his or her research. In addition, weekly reading sessions will be held.  Weekly seminars will be convened through the duration of two Oxford terms:  10 October to
8 December 2019 and 16 January to 18 March 2020.  These will offer a forum for the Fellows to address central research topics related to the overall theme of the Seminar.  The concluding conference will be held from 16 to 18 March 2020.

 Visiting Fellows will receive an allowance of £2,515 (pro rata) per calendar month for the period of their tenure.  Travelling expenses up to £550 pounds sterling will also be provided, and Fellows will be provided with a college association during their time at Oxford.  Fellows will be expected to be in Oxford for at least one Oxford term.  Applicants should indicate the specific research they would undertake in the course of Fellowship and how this research would contribute to the broader work of the project.  Applications both by senior scholars and by scholars at postdoctoral and advanced doctoral level are welcome.

 Closing date for applications:  12 October 2018

 For more detailed information see:
http://www.ochjs.ac.uk/academics/visiting-academics/visiting-fellows/

For any other queries contact:

Martine Smith-Huvers (registrar@ochjs.ac.uk)

or contact:

Dr Diana Matut (diana.matut@judaistik.uni-halle.de)

 

 

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Montague Burton PhD Fee Bursary in Jewish Studies, University of Leeds

Montague Burton PhD Fee Bursary in Jewish Studies

One Montague Burton PhD Bursary in Jewish Studies is available in the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies for session 2018/19.

The bursary will cover fees at the Home/EU rate.

The aim of this bursary is particularly to encourage engagement with Judaica held in Special Collections at Leeds University Library, first and foremost the renowned Cecil Roth Collection, which includes illuminated Hebrew manuscripts from the medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods. The Joseph Porton collection of Judaic books is a rare testimony of the collecting patterns and scholarship of the English rabbinate of the late 19th and early 20th century.

A rich archive of works by Jewish artists, and objects and documents relating mainly to the history of Jews in Leeds and Yorkshire can be found at Leeds Museums and Galleries. The West Yorkshire Archive Service also keeps a collection of documents relating to Jewish history in the region.

The bursary is intended for a doctoral project that focusses on one of the following areas:

  • Jewish visualities and/or materialities (between the medieval and the contemporary period, and including fine art, book art, architecture, photography and the moving image);
  • Jewish studies resources held in Leeds and/or Yorkshire;
  • the study of Jewish museums and collections (nationally or internationally).

Applicants can also propose a practice-led research project, provided it ties in with the above research areas. Respective protocols for the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Cultures can be found here.

We furthermore invite practitioners based in Jewish museums to contact us with research proposals that would benefit from a collaboration with the Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Leeds.

The bursary is especially suited to candidates with an interest/background in Jewish studies and visual cultures.

The PhD studentship will be based at the University of Leeds in the Centre for Jewish Studies. The Centre fosters an active research programme in several aspects of Jewish culture, foremost relating to Jewish visualities, musicalities, performativities; memory culture; the Holocaust in cultural memory.

Supervisors: Dr Eva Frojmovic / other staff associated with the Centre for Jewish Studies.

The Cecil Roth Collection

The holdings comprise medieval and early modern manuscripts in Hebrew and other Jewish languages; pre-1850 Hebrew printed books going back to the 16th century, among which a significant collection of books authored or printed by Menasseh ben Israel; Anglo-Judaica, many of which in English and relating to both Anglo-Jewish history and anti-Judaism.

Funding and Support

The bursary will pay for Home/EU fees over 3 years full-time or 5 years part-time. NB: The bursary will not cover accommodation and living costs.

The project start date will be 1 October 2018, and the successful applicant will be able to undertake study on a full- or part-time basis.

How to Apply

See here for full details including how to apply. The closing date for applications has been extended to 15 June 2018.

For more information, or to informally discuss the bursary, contact lead supervisor Dr Eva Frojmovic at clsef@leeds.ac.uk

The Parkes East and Central European MA Scholarship in Jewish History and Culture

The Parkes Institute for the Study of Jewish/non-Jewish Relations

 The Parkes East and Central European MA Scholarship in Jewish History and Culture

One Scholarship is available for citizens of selected East and East-Central European countries to study for an MA in Jewish History and Culture at the Faculty of Humanities, University of Southampton, UK in 2018/19.
The University of Southampton is home to the Parkes Institute, one of the foremost centres for the study of Jewish history, culture, and literature in the UK, with specialists in ancient and modern Jewish history, literature, and culture, and the histories of British, German, South African, and East European Jewries.  The Parkes Library and Archive is an outstanding resource for the study of Jewish history and culture.

The University seeks candidates who intend to use the degree to start an academic career or further an existing career in cultural, educational, archaeological, or communal work (e.g. Museum, Holocaust education, archive).

Eligibility:

  • You must be a national of and currently residing within one of the following countries: Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Lithuania, Latvia, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, or Slovakia.Please note that we are not accepting applications from non-European Union countries.
  • You must be expecting to return to the country concerned at the end of the period of study.
  • You should hold a degree of an equivalent standard to at least a good UK second class Honours degree.
  • You should have a standard of English that meets University of Southampton admission requirements (IELTS 7.0 overall)
  • You should not have already been awarded a university doctorate from another academic institution
  • You should not have already spent a substantial period of time (more than a year) studying in a university outside your home country.

Deadline: Friday 22ndJune 2018.
How to apply:
See our website http://www.southampton.ac.uk/parkes/postgraduate/ma.page for information about the programme and details on how to apply.

In addition to your online application for the MA programme, please send a CV and a personal statement regarding this studentship to Dr Claire Le Foll at c.le-foll@soton.ac.uk.

Montague Burton PhD Bursary in Jewish Studies (University of Leeds)

Montague Burton PhD Bursary in Jewish Studies (University of Leeds)

PhD Fee Bursary for UK/EU applicants

Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Leeds

Supervisors: Dr Eva Frojmovic / other staff associated with the Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Leeds

The bursary is intended for a doctoral project that focusses on one of the following areas:

  • Jewish visualities and/or materialities (between the medieval and the contemporary period, and including fine art, book art, architecture, photography and the moving image),
  • Jewish studies resources held in Leeds and/or Yorkshire,
  • the study of Jewish museums and collections (nationally or internationally).

The aim of this bursary is particularly to encourage engagement with Judaica held in Special Collections at Leeds University Library, first and foremost the renowned Cecil Roth Collection, which includes illuminated Hebrew manuscripts from the medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods. For more information, see https://library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections/subject-theme/610 and https://explore.library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections-explore/114260. The Joseph Porton collection of Judaic books is a rare testimony of the collecting patterns and scholarship of the English rabbinate of the late 19th and early 20th century:https://explore.library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections-explore/500299

A rich archive of works by Jewish artists, and objects and documents relating mainly to the history of Jews in Leeds and Yorkshre can be found at Leeds Museums and Galleries. The West Yorkshire archive service also keeps a collection of documents relating to Jewish history in the region.

Applicants can also propose a practice-led research project, provided it ties in with the above research areas. Respective protocols for the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Cultures can be found at: http://ses.leeds.ac.uk/info/22149/a-z_of_policies_and_key_documents/674/research_degree_candidatures_code_of_practice

We furthermore invite practitioners based in Jewish museums to contact us with research proposals that would benefit from a collaboration with the Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Leeds.

The bursary is especially suited to candidates with an interest/background in Jewish studies and visual cultures.

Where you’ll be based

The PhD studentship will be based at the University of Leeds in the Centre for Jewish Studies. The Leeds CJS fosters an active research programme in several aspects of Jewish culture, foremost relating to Jewish visualities, musicalities, performativities; memory culture; the Holocaust in cultural memory.

Funding and Support

The bursary will pay for Home/EU fees over 3 years full-time or 5 years part-time. NB: The bursary will not cover accommodation and living costs.

The project start date will be 1 October 2018, and the successful applicant will be able to undertake study on a full- or part-time basis.

How to Apply

To make an application, please submit the following documents to fineartpgr@leeds.ac.uk:

  • 800-1,000-word research proposal, which gives an indication of where the envisaged project is situated in existing research and how it will advance knowledge in the area of enquiry,
  • Curriculum vitae (no more than 2 sides of A4)
  • Sample of writing (3,000 words max.)
  • Names and contact details of two academic referees.
  • MA certificate and transcript of marks (or transcript of marks to date if currently studying for an MA)
  • IELTS certificate (if English is not your first language)

For further details, or to informally discuss the bursary, contact lead supervisor Dr Eva Frojmovic at clsef@leeds.ac.uk

 

ORT Marks PhD Fellowship

ORT Marks PhD Fellowship

World ORT and the University of Southampton are pleased to announce a PhD fellowship of £10,000 per annum for a student applying to study Jewish History and Culture at the University of Southampton beginning in October 2018.

Students may work on any area or period of Jewish history or culture, and be registered in any department where they can be supervised by a member of the Parkes Institute (http://www.southampton.ac.uk/parkes/index.page).

The fellowship will be granted for one year in the first instance, but requests for full 3-year funding will be considered sympathetically. Renewal will be subject to annual review.

While pursuing their degrees, fellows will devote 1 day per week to work on the ORT Music and the Holocaust website (http://holocaustmusic.ort.org/), a leading and widely-used educational resource that was featured at the United Nations in 2014. Fellows are expected to write short entries (c.1000 words) for the website, plan and deliver outreach events, and engage in social media. No prior knowledge or musical expertise is required.

Alongside an application to the University of Southampton for their chosen course of study, applicants should submit a short CV and 300-word statement to s.gilbert@soton.ac.uk by Friday 9 February 2018. The statement should briefly outline your research interests and your interest in working on the website.

World ORT is a non-profit organisation with past and present activities in more than 100 countries spanning 135 years. ORT educates people, trains people, and builds economic self-sufficiency for communities. World ORT is the world’s largest Jewish education and vocational training NGO (Non-Governmental Organization), benefitting 300,000 people each year.

The University of Southampton is one of the UK’s leading research universities. It is one of 24 universities in the Russell Group, committed to maintaining the very best research and teaching. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (December 2014), the University’s History Department was ranked 3rd in the country.

The Astaire Ernst Levin Collection PhD Scholarship

The Astaire Ernst Levin Collection PhD Scholarship

Applications are invited for a fully funded PhD (3 years, fees and living allowance) at the University of Edinburgh. Applicants must be UK/EU passport holders, and base their research on the Ernst Levin Collection:

The studentship is based on research inside an uncatalogued collection of personal papers created and collected by neurologist Ernst Levin (1887 – 1975), the equivalent of approximately 120 archive boxes. The collection is held in Lothian Health Services Archive (LHSA), Centre for Research Collections (CRC), University of Edinburgh. The studentship will be based partly in the CRC (office space and reading room) and partly in the School of Divinity, New College.

Born in Berlin, Ernst Levin studied medicine in Munich, specialising in neurology and neuro-rehabilitation, for which he was awarded a Chair from the University of Munich in 1933. The Nazi rise to power in the same year meant that, since he was Jewish by birth, Levin could no longer work in his native Germany, instead emigrating to Scotland, followed later by his wife Anicuţa and his daughter Annekathrin. Levin worked as a neurologist across hospitals in Edinburgh, beginning under pioneering neurosurgeon Norman Dott, a forerunner in aneurysm surgery and diagnosis.

Levin’s papers reflect an individual’s intersection with a turbulent decade in Europe’s political and cultural history. As well as tracing a significant medical career, his archive outlines time in the military as an Assistant Surgeon in the First World War, his close personal relationships and his family’s friendships with prominent individuals in German culture, including Max Unold, celebrated painter, graphic artist and writer in the ‘New Objectivity’ movement. Levin’s archive also shows a family uprooted, adjusting to their new life and status as refugees in Scotland before and after the Second World War. For more information on the collection (which is in both German and English scripts), please see: http://libraryblogs.is.ed.ac.uk/levin/

The Levin archive has not been the basis of any major scholarship, and is mostly uncatalogued. To this end, the studentship will involve a certain amount of scoping. In the first phase of the research, the successful candidate will determine the focus of their doctoral project, while also describing the collection to make it more accessible through archival cataloguing. During scoping, it is expected that the successful candidate will catalogue consulted items in the CRC, making the collection navigable for the general public as well as for their own research project. Full training and support in cataloguing will be given by LHSA staff, adding invaluable vocational experience in the cultural heritage sector to the academic research opportunities offered by the studentship. There will also be an outreach component to the studentship, with the successful candidate contributing to established publicity outlets, such as blogs, and delivering talks about the collection to academic and general public audiences.

Potential candidates are, at their own cost, welcome to visit the CRC reading room to view parts of the Levin archive before or during the application process. To arrange a visit, please contact: lhsa@ed.ac.uk / +44 131 6503392.

Further information on LHSA and CRC is available online:

http://www.lhsa.lib.ed.ac.uk/

https://www.ed.ac.uk/information-services/library-museum-gallery/crc

Applicants are welcome, at any stage of the application process, to discuss possible avenues for research with Dr Holtschneider (principal supervisor for the PhD project on the Ernst Levin Collection): h.holtschneider@ed.ac.uk

To apply please follow the normal on-line process for graduate applications to the School detailed here: https://www.ed.ac.uk/divinity/studying/graduate-school/information-for-applicants/how-to-apply. Please ensure that in Section 7 ‘Finance’ you state that you are applying for the Ernst Levin Scholarship. As the PhD project is related to a collection not yet catalogued, rather than submitting a fully formed PhD proposal, please submit a statement of intent, outlining your area of interest in relation to the collection. Please also include a full CV, giving evidence of specific research skills, including your fluency in German and your ability to read German handwriting in old German script (Sütterlin).

Criteria for the award of the Ernst Levin PhD Scholarship are those generally applying for the award of a scholarship from the School of Divinity and the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, AND evidence of meeting the language requirements necessary for working on the Ernst Levin Collection, as well as evidence of being used to handling archive primary source material as a researcher.

Applications need to be submitted by 31 March 2018, 5pm GMT.

Interviews (via video-conference / Skype) will take place in early May.

The successful applicant will be notified no later than one week after the interview.

 

Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme 2018/19 (PhD students)

Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme BMBF – Studienstiftung – Leo Baeck Institute London

Aim of the Programme

The international Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme awards fellowships to doctoral students who carry out research into the history and culture of Central European Jewry. We welcome projects on any period or field (including literature, philosophy, history, musicology), and any region (such as Europe, Israel, the Americas), as long as they relate to German-speaking Jewry. In addition to financial support for one year, the programme offers an opportunity to exchange ideas and to network. It is open to doctoral candidates of any nationality, studying at any university. All fellows remain at their home institution, but get together for two workshops which are jointly organised by the Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes and the Leo Baeck Institute London.

Requirements

  • University degree(s) with outstanding marks
  • Date of latest degree not before February 2015
  • Formal qualification for doctoral studies
  • Research project focussing on the history and culture of Central European Jewry

Programme schedule

Up to twelve fellows will be selected for the programme in the academic year 2017/18. The fellowships run from October 2018 to September 2019. Regular workshops and a common intranet will support scholarship holders in presenting their research and discussing methodologies and findings with other fellows. Working languages are German and English. After the first year, students enrolled at a university in Germany may apply for an extension, provided that the Studienstiftung has funding available.

Funding

Fellows receive a stipend of 1,350 EUR per month, generally supplemented by a monthly research allowance of 100 EUR. For research trips and conference participation monthly supplements and travel allowances are available on application. Tuition fees are not covered.

Application

Candidates are invited to submit the following documents in English or German:

– Application form (download from the website)

– Cover letter outlining the motivation for participation in the programme (1 page)

– Curriculum vitae with details on education, general interests and language skills

– Photocopy of university degree(s), including marks/grading

– Research proposal (5 pages)

– Research schedule for the academic year 2018/19, including planned research

trips

– Letter of recommendation by the supervisor of the PhD project

– Second letter of recommendation

The deadline for application is the 1st February 2018.

We accept applications by e-mail (as a single pdf document please, including the letters of recommendation) or conventional mail. Only complete application sets will be considered. Shortlisted candidates will be invited to an interview in Frankfurt in April 2018.

Contact

Dr Guy Tourlamain

Telephone +49 228 82096-282

leobaeck@studienstiftung.de

 

Secretary

Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes

Christine Schade

Ahrstraße 41

53175 Bonn

Germany

Telephone +49 228 82096-281

schade@studienstiftung.de