European Association for Jewish Studies Newsflash, November 2018

This month’s newsflash with details of european-wide activities (including forthcoming funding deadlines; positions available; scholarships, fellowships, grants, and prizes; conferences and calls for papers; new books and journals; and news and events) is available at: https://mailchi.mp/c96fcd2a64d9/u30vyc70dp-2762777

 

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‘Points of Arrival’ – 5 short films about Jewish migration to Scotland

Points of Arrival – 5 short films about Jewish migration to Scotland

Each three-minute film concentrates on a historical Jewish immigrant to Scotland – where they came from, when and how they arrived, and their subsequent life here. Their stories are told by contemporary narrators, whose own lives resonate strongly with their subject matter.

The films are intended for classroom use and offer many possibilities for engaging students with the history of migration to Britain, the impact of migration on individuals, the reception of refugees, the contribution of immigrants to their new surroundings and communities.

Introduction and links to the 5 films:

http://jewishmigrationtoscotland.is.ed.ac.uk/index.php/2018/10/23/points-of-arrival-a-series-of-short-films-from-the-jewish-lives-scottish-spaces-project/

Direct link to all the films, including 20min full compilation:

https://vimeo.com/user82357432/videos/page:1/sort:alphabetical/format:thumbnail

Conference, ‘The Use and Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Antiquity’ (5–7 November 2018)

Conference,The Use and Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Antiquity’

Department of History, Religions & Philosophies, SOAS, University of London

in collaboration with the Faculty of Theology, University of Oslo, Norway

5-7 November 2018

SALT lecture theatre (S110, Paul Webley Wing)

Everyone is welcome – entrance is free of charge

 

Monday 5 November

14:00-14:15h: Introduction (Catherine Hezser, SOAS)

Session 1: Popular Religious Knowledge in Ancient Mesopotamia

14:15-15:00h: Andrew George, SOAS, University of London:

“Access to Religious Knowledge in Ancient Babylonia”.

15:00-15:45h: Sam Mirelman, SOAS, University of London:

“Public Lamentation in Ancient Mesopotamia”.

15:45-16:15h: Coffee break

Session 2: Judean Communities of the Second Temple Period

16:15-17:00h: Diana Edelman, University of Oslo:

“How was Jewish Religious Knowledge Disseminated in Judean Communities ca. 350-30 BCE?”

17:00-17:45h: David Hamidovic, University of Lausanne:

“The Production and Dissemination of Knowledge in the Community of Qumran”.

 

Tuesday 6 November

Session 3: Rabbis and “Popular” Judaism

9:30-10:15h: Philip Alexander, University of Manchester:

“’If They Are Not Prophets, They Are Sons of Prophets’: Folk Religion (minhag) as a Source of Rabbinic Law”.

10:15-11:00h: Catherine Hezser, SOAS, University of London:

“Interaction between Rabbis and Non-Rabbinic Jews in Palestinian Rabbinic Literature of Late Antiquity”.

11:00-11:30h: Coffee Break

Session 4: Liturgy and the Synagogue

11:30-12:15h: Anders Runesson, University of Oslo:

“The Role of the Synagogue in the Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Late Antiquity”.

12:15-13:00h: Stefan Reif, University of Cambridge:

“Medieval Jewish Prayers and Rituals as Religious Education”.

13:00-14:00h: Lunch break

Session 5: Near Middle Eastern Christian Communities

14:00-14:45h: Hugo Lundhaug, University of Oslo:

“The Use and Dissemination of Apocrypha in Egyptian Monasteries”.

14:45-15:30h: Erica Hunter, SOAS, University of London:

“Public and Private Religious Practices Amongst the Christian Communities of Mesopotamia”.

 

Wednesday 7 November

Session 6: Material Culture and Women’s Religiosity

9:30-10:15h: Annette Weissenrieder, University of Halle:

“The Function of Material Culture in the Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Ancient Christianity”.

10:15-11:00h: Christine Amadou, University of Oslo:

“The Tecla Tradition and Women’s Religious Knowledge in Early Christianity”.

11:00-11:30h: Coffee break.

Session 7: Reading, Education, and Scholastic Transmission

11:30-12:15h: Hindy Najman, University of Oxford:

“Reading Practices and the Vitality of Scripture”.

12:15-13:00h: Jan Stenger, University of Glasgow:

“Religious Knowledge and Models of Authority in Sixth-Century Gaza”.

13:00-13:45h: Holger Zellentin, University of Cambridge:

“The Transmission of Legal and Literary Features of Late Antique Literature into the Qur’anic Milieu”.

14:00-15:00h: Final discussions over lunch.

 

 

 

 

 

For further information please contact Prof. Catherine Hezser (ch12@soas.ac.uk)

Online course applications open, ‘Bridging the Great Divide: the Jewish-Muslim Encounter’

APPLY NOW for online course, Bridging the Great Divide: the Jewish-Muslim Encounter

Despite their closeness in belief and practice, today, Jewish-Muslim interactions are often the source of intense religious conflict. With the current global crises and changes, there has never been a greater need for understanding of, and learning about, other faiths and relations between faiths.

The Woolf Institute (Cambridge), in partnership with the School of International Service at the American University in Washington DC, is delighted to announce that the online course, Bridging the Great Divide: the Jewish-Muslim Encounter, will be offered again in 2019.

Celebrating its 7thanniversary, this 15-week online course will explore the history, culture and theology of Muslims and Jews, reflecting both on similarities and differences as well as discussing the major challenges. Assisted by leading experts and early career scholars in Europe and the USA, the course will also offer strategies for building bridges between the communities.

Because this course is committed to the highest levels of scholarly integrity, it will provide a space for the discussion of the entire range, in the broadest sense, of the Jewish-Muslim encounter. This discussion does not preclude more controversial issues.

Applications are now being accepted for the course commencing on Monday 14 January 2019. (The deadline for applications is Sunday 16 December 2018.)

The course fee for Woolf Institute students is £465. Bursaries are available.

For further details, visit the course webpage: http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/study/online-courses/bridging-the-great-divide-the-jewish-muslim-encounter

 

 

 

 

Oxford Seminar in Advanced Jewish Studies, 2020-2021

Oxford Seminar in Advanced Jewish Studies, 2020-2021

Call for Proposals 

Closing Date:  14 January, 2019

 The Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies invites proposals from individuals or institutions wishing to direct an Oxford Seminar in Advanced Jewish Studies in 2020-2021.  The Seminar may be convened either from mid October to mid March or from mid January to mid June.

The Seminar will convene in weekly meetings through the duration of two Oxford terms, which in 2020-2021 will be from 11 October to 5 December 2020, 17 January to 13 March 2021, and 25 April to 19 June 2021.  These meetings will offer a forum for the group to address central research topics related to the overall theme of the project.  One or more publications will be expected as a product of the Seminar.

The Seminar will be based on a core of visiting fellows who will participate in the work of the research group for the full six months, in conjunction with a larger number of fellows who will attend for shorter periods. The Seminar can expect funding for up to the equivalent of seven fellows in residence for six months.

Visiting fellows will each receive an allowance, including a sum to cover accommodation and travelling expenses, and shared office space in the centre of Oxford in the Clarendon Institute, where the Leopold Muller Memorial Library is housed and where most of the Centre’s academic staff have their offices.

Proposals are invited for research groups in any area of Hebrew and Jewish Studies.  Preference will be given to a project with a clear research rationale which involves use of special resources available in Oxford.

Proposals, in not more than two pages, should include the following information:

  1. Title of Seminar
  2. Seminar leader or leaders
  3. Description of subject
  4. Methods to be used to take advantage of collaborative research
  5. Possibilities for innovation through the research project
  6. Reasons why Oxford is particularly appropriate as the venue for the seminar
  7. Value of the Seminar for the development of Jewish Studies as an academic subject
  8. Names of scholars who might be invited to participate in the project

Please attach a brief curriculum vitae of each Seminar leader.

The Centre will inform applicants in early February 2019 which proposals have been selected for further consideration and may request further information from proposers before the final decision in mid March 2019.

Please send your proposal to the Registrar, Martine Smith-Huvers, by email (registrar@ochjs.ac.uk) by 14 January 2019.

For information on previous Seminars held at the Centre see http://www.ochjs.ac.uk/academic-activities/previous-research-projects-osajs/

and on the Seminar to be held in 2019-20, see

http://www.ochjs.ac.uk/academic-activities/oxford-seminar-in-advanced-jewish-studies-current/

Woolf Institute Summer School, July 2019

Woolf Institute Summer School, July 2019

The Woolf Institute opens its new Summer School in July 2019 to graduate students. The Summer School offers programmes of study for those interested in religion and society.

Classes will be taught by Cambridge academics in a beautiful new building in the heart of the city. Cambridge is one of Europe’s most beautiful destinations and is just one hour from London.

Join us for an accredited Masters of Arts module or complete a Woolf Institute Certificate of Completion. Students will learn alongside Master’s students from the Cambridge Theological Federation who are studying for a degree accredited by Anglia Ruskin University.

The Woolf Institute Summer School offers two modules:

  • Religion and Society from the Medieval to the Modern (July 1st to July 12th 2019): Lectures and seminars on Jews, Muslims and Christians in the Middle East, southern Europe and the Balkans from the medieval era to modern times.
  • New Neighbours: Diverse Parishes (July 15th to July 26th 2019): Lectures and seminars on citizenship, integration and discrimination within religious and ethnic minority communities.

For further information contact:

Dr Emma Harris: eth22@cam.ac.uk

Or visit us here: https://bit.ly/2LnXOPv

Course fees start at £800

 

‘The Use and Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Antiquity’, Conference (5-7 November, 2018)

Conference: The Use and Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Antiquity

Department of History, Religions & Philosophies, SOAS, University of London

in collaboration with the Faculty of Theology, University of Oslo, Norway

5-7 November 2018, SALT lecture theatre (S110, Paul Webley Wing)

Everyone is welcome – entrance is free of charge

 

Monday 5 November

14:00-14:15h: Introduction (Catherine Hezser, SOAS)

Session 1: Popular Religious Knowledge in Ancient Mesopotamia

14:15-15:00h: Andrew George, SOAS, University of London:

“Access to Religious Knowledge in Ancient Babylonia”.

15:00-15:45h: Sam Mirelman, SOAS, University of London:

“Public Lamentation in Ancient Mesopotamia”.

 

15:45-16:15h: Coffee break

 

Session 2: Judean Communities of the Second Temple Period

16:15-17:00h: Diana Edelman, University of Oslo:

“How was Jewish Religious Knowledge Disseminated in Judean Communities ca. 350-30 BCE?”

17:00-17:45h: David Hamidovic, University of Lausanne:

“The Production and Dissemination of Knowledge in the Community of Qumran”.

 

Tuesday 6 November

Session 3: Rabbis and “Popular” Judaism

9:30-10:15h: Philip Alexander, University of Manchester:

“’If They Are Not Prophets, They Are Sons of Prophets’: Folk Religion (minhag) as a Source of Rabbinic Law”.

10:15-11:00h: Catherine Hezser, SOAS, University of London:

“Interaction between Rabbis and Non-Rabbinic Jews in Palestinian Rabbinic Literature of Late Antiquity”.

 

11:00-11:30h: Coffee Break

 

Session 4: Liturgy and the Synagogue

11:30-12:15h: Anders Runesson, University of Oslo:

“The Role of the Synagogue in the Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Late Antiquity”.

12:15-13:00h: Stefan Reif, University of Cambridge:

“Medieval Jewish Prayers and Rituals as Religious Education”.

 

13:00-14:00h: Lunch break

 

Session 5: Near Middle Eastern Christian Communities

14:00-14:45h: Hugo Lundhaug, University of Oslo:

“The Use and Dissemination of Apocrypha in Egyptian Monasteries”.

14:45-15:30h: Erica Hunter, SOAS, University of London:

“Public and Private Religious Practices Amongst the Christian Communities of Mesopotamia”.

 

Wednesday 7 November

Session 6: Material Culture and Women’s Religiosity

9:30-10:15h: Annette Weissenrieder, University of Halle:

“The Function of Material Culture in the Dissemination of Religious Knowledge in Ancient Christianity”.

10:15-11:00h: Christine Amadou, University of Oslo:

“The Tecla Tradition and Women’s Religious Knowledge in Early Christianity”.

 

11:00-11:30h: Coffee break.

 

Session 7: Reading, Education, and Scholastic Transmission

11:30-12:15h: Hindy Najman, University of Oxford:

“Reading Practices and the Vitality of Scripture”.

12:15-13:00h: Jan Stenger, University of Glasgow:

“Religious Knowledge and Models of Authority in Sixth-Century Gaza”.

13:00-13:45h: Holger Zellentin, University of Cambridge:

“The Transmission of Legal and Literary Features of Late Antique Literature into the Qur’anic Milieu”.

 

14:00-15:00h: Final discussions over lunch.

For further information please contact Prof. Catherine Hezser (ch12@soas.ac.uk)